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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Mpl traffics to the cell surface through conventional and unconventional routes.
Traffic
PUBLISHED: 06-10-2014
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Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are often characterized by JAK2 or calreticulin (CALR) mutations, indicating aberrant trafficking in pathogenesis. This study focuses on Mpl trafficking and Jak2 association using two model systems: human erythroleukemia cells (HEL; JAK2V617F) and K562 myeloid leukemia cells (JAK2WT). Consistent with a putative chaperone role for Jak2, Mpl and Jak2 associate on both intracellular and plasma membranes (shown by proximity ligation assay) and siRNA-mediated knockdown of Jak2 led to Mpl trapping in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Even in Jak2 sufficient cells, Mpl accumulates in punctate structures that partially colocalize with ER-tracker, the ER exit site marker (ERES) Sec31a, the autophagy marker LC3 and LAMP1. Mpl was fused to miniSOG, a genetically encoded tag for correlated light and electron microscopy. Results suggest that a fraction of Mpl is taken up into autophagic structures from the ER and routed to autolyososomes. Surface biotinylation shows that both immature and mature Mpl reach the cell surface; in K562 cells Mpl is also released in exosomes. Both forms rapidly internalize upon ligand addition, while recovery is primarily attributed to immature Mpl. Mpl appears to reach the plasma membrane via both conventional ER-Golgi and autolysosome secretory pathways, as well as recycling.
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The architectural relationship of components controlling mast cell endocytosis.
J. Cell. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 08-28-2013
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Eukaryotic cells use multiple routes for receptor internalization. Here, we examine the topographical relationships of clathrin-dependent and clathrin-independent endocytic structures on the plasma membranes of leukemia-derived mast cells. The high affinity IgE receptor (Fc?RI) utilizes both pathways, whereas transferrin receptor serves as a marker for the classical clathrin-mediated endocytosis pathway. Both receptors were tracked by live-cell imaging in the presence or absence of inhibitors that established their differential dependence on specific endocytic adaptor proteins. The topology of antigen-bound Fc?RI, clathrin, dynamin, Arf6 and Eps15-positive structures were analyzed by 2D and 3D immunoelectron microscopy techniques, revealing their remarkable spatial relationships and unique geometry. We conclude that the mast cell plasma membrane has multiple specialized domains for endocytosis. Their close proximity might reflect shared components, such as lipids and adaptor proteins, that facilitate inward membrane curvature. Intersections between these specialized domains might represent sorting stations that direct cargo to specific endocytic pathways.
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H2O2 localization in the green alga Micrasterias after salt and osmotic stress by TEM-coupled electron energy loss spectroscopy.
Protoplasma
PUBLISHED: 08-21-2009
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Reactive oxygen species (ROS), including hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), are constantly generated as by-products of normal metabolic cellular pathways and can be overproduced in response to stress. In this study, we investigated ROS production and localization of H(2)O(2) after salt (200 mM KCl) and osmotic (iso-osmotic sorbitol concentration) stress in the unicellular green alga Micrasterias. By means of the dye H(2)DCFDA and confocal laser scanning microscopy, most ROS production could be detected in KCl-treated cells when compared to sorbitol-exposed cells and controls. For ultrastructural detection of H(2)O(2), CeCl(3), which reacts with H(2)O(2) and produces cerium perhydroxide deposits, has been used. Cerium was identified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM)-coupled electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) in organelles of KCl- and sorbitol-treated cells and in controls. Statistical measurements of the presence of the cerium M(4,5) edge were performed in mitochondria, chloroplasts, cell walls, and cytoplasmic sites of five individual cells after each treatment. The most pronounced increase in H(2)O(2) production was found in chloroplasts of KCl- and sorbitol-treated cells. This shows that the chloroplast reveals the strongest response in H(2)O(2) production after stress induction in Micrasterias. Significant elevation of H(2)O(2) production also occurred in mitochondria and cytoplasm, whereas H(2)O(2) levels remained unchanged or even slightly decreased in cell walls of treated cells. Additionally, TEM micrographs and EELS analyses provided indirect evidence for an increased H(2)O(2) production at the plasma membrane of KCl-treated cells, indicating an involvement of the plasma membrane NADPH oxidase in H(2)O(2) generation.
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PCD and autophagy in the unicellular green alga Micrasterias denticulata.
Autophagy
PUBLISHED: 08-20-2009
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Programmed cell death (PCD) plays a central role in normal plant development and is also induced by various biotic and abiotic stress factors. In the unicellular freshwater green alga Micrasterias denticulata morphological and biochemical hallmarks such as the appearance of autophagosomes, increased production of ROS and degradation of genomic DNA into small fragments ("DNA laddering") indicate PCD. Our data not only demonstrate that Micrasterias is capable of performing PCD under salt stress, but also that it is triggered by the ionic and not osmotic component of salinity. Additionally, results from the present and previous studies suggest that different inducers may lead to different cell death pathways in one and the same organism.
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Salt stress-induced cell death in the unicellular green alga Micrasterias denticulata.
J. Exp. Bot.
PUBLISHED: 02-12-2009
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Programmed cell death (PCD) is a key element in normal plant growth and development which may also be induced by various abiotic and biotic stress factors including salt stress. In the present study, morphological, biochemical, and physiological responses of the theoretically immortal unicellular freshwater green alga Micrasterias denticulata were examined after salt (200 mM NaCl or 200 mM KCl) and osmotic stress induced by iso-osmotic sorbitol. KCl caused morphological changes such as cytoplasmic vacuolization, extreme deformation of mitochondria, and ultrastructural changes of Golgi and ER. However, prolonged salt stress (24 h) led to the degradation of organelles by autophagy, a special form of PCD, both in NaCl- and KCl-treated cells. This was indicated by the enclosure of organelles by ER-derived double membranes. DNA of NaCl- and KCl-stressed cells but not of sorbitol-treated cells showed a ladder-like pattern on agarose gel, which means that the ionic rather than the osmotic component of salt stress leads to the activation of the responsible endonuclease. DNA laddering during salt stress could be abrogated by addition of Zn(2+). Neither cytochrome c release from mitochondria nor increase in caspase-3-like activity occurred after salt stress. Reactive oxygen species could be detected within 5 min after the onset of salt and osmotic stress. Respiration, photosynthetic activity, and pigment composition indicated an active metabolism which supports programmed rather than necrotic cell death in Micrasterias after salt stress.
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Low temperature acclimation of photosynthetic capacity and leaf morphology in the context of phloem loading type.
Photosyn. Res.
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Carbon export from leaf mesophyll to sugar-transporting phloem occurs via either an apoplastic (across the cell membrane) or symplastic (through plasmodesmatal cell wall openings) pathway. Herbaceous apoplastic loaders generally exhibit an up-regulation of photosynthetic capacity in response to growth at lower temperature. However, acclimation of photosynthesis to temperature by symplastically loading species, whose geographic distribution is particularly strong in tropical and subtropical areas, has not been characterized. Photosynthetic and leaf anatomical acclimation to lower temperature was explored in two symplastic (Verbascum phoeniceum, Cucurbita pepo) and two apoplastic (Helianthus annuus, Spinacia oleracea) loaders, representing summer- and winter-active life histories for each loading type. Regardless of phloem loading type, the two summer-active species, C. pepo and H. annuus, exhibited neither foliar anatomical nor photosynthetic acclimation when grown under low temperature compared to moderate temperature. In contrast, and again irrespective of phloem loading type, the two winter-active mesophytes, V. phoeniceum and S. oleracea, exhibited both a greater number of palisade cell layers (and thus thicker leaves) and significantly higher maximal capacities of photosynthetic electron transport, as well as, in the case of V. phoeniceum, a greater foliar vein density in response to cool temperatures compared to growth at moderate temperature. It is therefore noteworthy that symplastic phloem loading per se does not prevent acclimation of intrinsic photosynthetic capacity to cooler growth temperatures. Given the vagaries of weather and climate, understanding the basis of plant acclimation to, and tolerance of, low temperature is critical to maintaining and increasing plant productivity for food, fuel, and fiber to meet the growing demands of a burgeoning human population.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.