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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Nipbl and mediator cooperatively regulate gene expression to control limb development.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 09-01-2014
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Haploinsufficiency for Nipbl, a cohesin loading protein, causes Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS), the most common "cohesinopathy". It has been proposed that the effects of Nipbl-haploinsufficiency result from disruption of long-range communication between DNA elements. Here we use zebrafish and mouse models of CdLS to examine how transcriptional changes caused by Nipbl deficiency give rise to limb defects, a common condition in individuals with CdLS. In the zebrafish pectoral fin (forelimb), knockdown of Nipbl expression led to size reductions and patterning defects that were preceded by dysregulated expression of key early limb development genes, including fgfs, shha, hand2 and multiple hox genes. In limb buds of Nipbl-haploinsufficient mice, transcriptome analysis revealed many similar gene expression changes, as well as altered expression of additional classes of genes that play roles in limb development. In both species, the pattern of dysregulation of hox-gene expression depended on genomic location within the Hox clusters. In view of studies suggesting that Nipbl colocalizes with the mediator complex, which facilitates enhancer-promoter communication, we also examined zebrafish deficient for the Med12 Mediator subunit, and found they resembled Nipbl-deficient fish in both morphology and gene expression. Moreover, combined partial reduction of both Nipbl and Med12 had a strongly synergistic effect, consistent with both molecules acting in a common pathway. In addition, three-dimensional fluorescent in situ hybridization revealed that Nipbl and Med12 are required to bring regions containing long-range enhancers into close proximity with the zebrafish hoxda cluster. These data demonstrate a crucial role for Nipbl in limb development, and support the view that its actions on multiple gene pathways result from its influence, together with Mediator, on regulation of long-range chromosomal interactions.
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The protective role of symmetric stem cell division on the accumulation of heritable damage.
PLoS Comput. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 08-14-2014
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Stem cell divisions are either asymmetric-in which one daughter cell remains a stem cell and one does not-or symmetric, in which both daughter cells adopt the same fate, either stem or non-stem. Recent studies show that in many tissues operating under homeostatic conditions stem cell division patterns are strongly biased toward the symmetric outcome, raising the question of whether symmetry confers some benefit. Here, we show that symmetry, via extinction of damaged stem-cell clones, reduces the lifetime risk of accumulating phenotypically silent heritable damage (mutations or aberrant epigenetic changes) in individual stem cells. This effect is greatest in rapidly cycling tissues subject to accelerating rates of damage accumulation over time, a scenario that describes the progression of many cancers. A decrease in the rate of cellular damage accumulation may be an important factor favoring symmetric patterns of stem cell division.
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Making sense in biology: an appreciation of Julian Lewis.
BMC Biol.
PUBLISHED: 08-02-2014
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A BMP-FGF morphogen toggle switch drives the ultrasensitive expression of multiple genes in the developing forebrain.
PLoS Comput. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2014
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Borders are important as they demarcate developing tissue into distinct functional units. A key challenge is the discovery of mechanisms that can convert morphogen gradients into tissue borders. While mechanisms that produce ultrasensitive cellular responses provide a solution, how extracellular morphogens drive such mechanisms remains poorly understood. Here, we show how Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) and Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) pathways interact to generate ultrasensitivity and borders in the dorsal telencephalon. BMP and FGF signaling manipulations in explants produced border defects suggestive of cross inhibition within single cells, which was confirmed in dissociated cultures. Using mathematical modeling, we designed experiments that ruled out alternative cross inhibition mechanisms and identified a cross-inhibitory positive feedback (CIPF) mechanism, or "toggle switch", which acts upstream of transcriptional targets in dorsal telencephalic cells. CIPF explained several cellular phenomena important for border formation such as threshold tuning, ultrasensitivity, and hysteresis. CIPF explicitly links graded morphogen signaling in the telencephalon to switch-like cellular responses and has the ability to form multiple borders and scale pattern to size. These benefits may apply to other developmental systems.
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Reduction of Nipbl impairs cohesin loading locally and affects transcription but not cohesion-dependent functions in a mouse model of Cornelia de Lange Syndrome.
Biochim. Biophys. Acta
PUBLISHED: 04-01-2013
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Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is a genetic disorder linked to mutations in cohesin and its regulators. To date, it is unclear which function of cohesin is more relevant to the pathology of the syndrome. A mouse heterozygous for the gene encoding the cohesin loader Nipbl recapitulates many features of CdLS. We have carefully examined Nipbl deficient cells and here report that they have robust cohesion all along the chromosome. DNA replication, DNA repair and chromosome segregation are carried out efficiently in these cells. While bulk cohesin loading is unperturbed, binding to certain promoters such as the Protocadherin genes in brain is notably affected and alters gene expression. These results provide further support for the idea that developmental defects in CdLS are caused by deregulated transcription and not by malfunction of cohesion-related processes.
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How cells know where they are.
Science
PUBLISHED: 02-23-2013
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Development, regeneration, and even day-to-day physiology require plant and animal cells to make decisions based on their locations. The principles by which cells may do this are deceptively straightforward. But when reliability needs to be high--as often occurs during development--successful strategies tend to be anything but simple. Increasingly, the challenge facing biologists is to relate the diverse diffusible molecules, control circuits, and gene regulatory networks that help cells know where they are to the varied, sometimes stringent, constraints imposed by the need for real-world precision and accuracy.
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Spatiotemporal mechanisms of morphogen gradient interpretation.
Curr. Opin. Genet. Dev.
PUBLISHED: 09-21-2011
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Few mechanistic ideas from the pre-molecular era of biology have had as enduring an impact as the morphogen concept. In the classical view, cells in developing embryos obtain positional information by measuring morphogen concentrations and comparing them with fixed concentration thresholds; as a result, graded morphogen distributions map into discrete spatial arrangements of gene expression. Recent studies on Hedgehog and other morphogens suggest that establishing patterns of gene expression may be less a function of absolute morphogen concentrations, than of the dynamics of signal transduction, gene expression, and gradient formation. The data point away from any universal model of morphogen interpretation and suggest that organisms use multiple mechanisms for reading out developmental signals in order to accomplish specific patterning goals.
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Multifactorial origins of heart and gut defects in nipbl-deficient zebrafish, a model of Cornelia de Lange Syndrome.
PLoS Biol.
PUBLISHED: 09-13-2011
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Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is the founding member of a class of multi-organ system birth defect syndromes termed cohesinopathies, named for the chromatin-associated protein complex cohesin, which mediates sister chromatid cohesion. Most cases of CdLS are caused by haploinsufficiency for Nipped-B-like (Nipbl), a highly conserved protein that facilitates cohesin loading. Consistent with recent evidence implicating cohesin and Nipbl in transcriptional regulation, both CdLS cell lines and tissues of Nipbl-deficient mice show changes in the expression of hundreds of genes. Nearly all such changes are modest, however--usually less than 1.5-fold--raising the intriguing possibility that, in CdLS, severe developmental defects result from the collective action of many otherwise innocuous perturbations. As a step toward testing this hypothesis, we developed a model of nipbl-deficiency in zebrafish, an organism in which we can quantitatively investigate the combinatorial effects of gene expression changes. After characterizing the structure and embryonic expression of the two zebrafish nipbl genes, we showed that morpholino knockdown of these genes produces a spectrum of specific heart and gut/visceral organ defects with similarities to those in CdLS. Analysis of nipbl morphants further revealed that, as early as gastrulation, expression of genes involved in endodermal differentiation (sox32, sox17, foxa2, and gata5) and left-right patterning (spaw, lefty2, and dnah9) is altered. Experimental manipulation of the levels of several such genes--using RNA injection or morpholino knockdown--implicated both additive and synergistic interactions in causing observed developmental defects. These findings support the view that birth defects in CdLS arise from collective effects of quantitative changes in gene expression. Interestingly, both the phenotypes and gene expression changes in nipbl morphants differed from those in mutants or morphants for genes encoding cohesin subunits, suggesting that the transcriptional functions of Nipbl cannot be ascribed simply to its role in cohesin loading.
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Activin and GDF11 collaborate in feedback control of neuroepithelial stem cell proliferation and fate.
Development
PUBLISHED: 08-18-2011
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Studies of the olfactory epithelium model system have demonstrated that production of neurons is regulated by negative feedback. Previously, we showed that a locally produced signal, the TGF? superfamily ligand GDF11, regulates the genesis of olfactory receptor neurons by inhibiting proliferation of the immediate neuronal precursors (INPs) that give rise to them. GDF11 is antagonized by follistatin (FST), which is also produced locally. Here, we show that Fst(-/-) mice exhibit dramatically decreased neurogenesis, a phenotype that can only be partially explained by increased GDF11 activity. Instead, a second FST-binding factor, activin ?B (ACT?B), inhibits neurogenesis by a distinct mechanism: whereas GDF11 inhibits expansion of INPs, ACT?B inhibits expansion of stem and early progenitor cells. We present data supporting the concept that these latter cells, previously considered two distinct types, constitute a dynamic stem/progenitor population in which individual cells alternate expression of Sox2 and/or Ascl1. In addition, we demonstrate that interplay between ACT?B and GDF11 determines whether stem/progenitor cells adopt a glial versus neuronal fate. Altogether, the data indicate that the transition between stem cells and committed progenitors is neither sharp nor irreversible and that GDF11, ACT?B and FST are crucial components of a circuit that controls both total cell number and the ratio of neuronal versus glial cells in this system. Thus, our findings demonstrate a close connection between the signals involved in the control of tissue size and those that regulate the proportions of different cell types.
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ROBUSTNESS OF SIGNALING GRADIENT IN DROSOPHILA WING IMAGINAL DISC.
Discrete Continuous Dyn Syst Ser B
PUBLISHED: 06-01-2011
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Quasi-stable gradients of signaling protein molecules (known as morphogens or ligands) bound to cell receptors are known to be responsible for differential cell signaling and gene expressions. From these follow different stable cell fates and visually patterned tissues in biological development. Recent studies have shown that the relevant basic biological processes yield gradients that are sensitive to small changes in system characteristics (such as expression level of morphogens or receptors) or environmental conditions (such as temperature changes). Additional biological activities must play an important role in the high level of robustness observed in embryonic patterning for example. It is natural to attribute observed robustness to various type of feedback control mechanisms. However, our own simulation studies have shown that feedback control is neither necessary nor sufficient for robustness of the morphogen decapentaplegic (Dpp) gradient in wing imaginal disc of Drosophilas. Furthermore, robustness can be achieved by substantial binding of the signaling morphogen Dpp with nonsignaling cell surface bound molecules (such as heparan sulfate proteoglygans) and degrading the resulting complexes at a sufficiently rapid rate. The present work provides a theoretical basis for the results of our numerical simulation studies.
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Cohesin mediates chromatin interactions that regulate mammalian ?-globin expression.
J. Biol. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 03-29-2011
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The ?-globin locus undergoes dynamic chromatin interaction changes in differentiating erythroid cells that are thought to be important for proper globin gene expression. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The CCCTC-binding factor, CTCF, binds to the insulator elements at the 5 and 3 boundaries of the locus, but these sites were shown to be dispensable for globin gene activation. We found that, upon induction of differentiation, cohesin and the cohesin loading factor Nipped-B-like (Nipbl) bind to the locus control region (LCR) at the CTCF insulator and distal enhancer regions as well as at the specific target globin gene that undergoes activation upon differentiation. Nipbl-dependent cohesin binding is critical for long-range chromatin interactions, both between the CTCF insulator elements and between the LCR distal enhancer and the target gene. We show that the latter interaction is important for globin gene expression in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, the results indicate that such cohesin-mediated chromatin interactions associated with gene regulation are sensitive to the partial reduction of Nipbl caused by heterozygous mutation. This provides the first direct evidence that Nipbl haploinsufficiency affects cohesin-mediated chromatin interactions and gene expression. Our results reveal that dynamic Nipbl/cohesin binding is critical for developmental chromatin organization and the gene activation function of the LCR in mammalian cells.
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Pattern, growth, and control.
Cell
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2011
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Systems biology seeks not only to discover the machinery of life but to understand how such machinery is used for control, i.e., for regulation that achieves or maintains a desired, useful end. This sort of goal-directed, engineering-centered approach also has deep historical roots in developmental biology. Not surprisingly, developmental biology is currently enjoying an influx of ideas and methods from systems biology. This Review highlights current efforts to elucidate design principles underlying the engineering objectives of robustness, precision, and scaling as they relate to the developmental control of growth and pattern formation. Examples from vertebrate and invertebrate development are used to illustrate general lessons, including the value of integral feedback in achieving set-point control; the usefulness of self-organizing behavior; the importance of recognizing and appropriately handling noise; and the absence of "free lunch." By illuminating such principles, systems biology is helping to create a functional framework within which to make sense of the mechanistic complexity of organismal development.
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Heparan sulfate acts as a bone morphogenetic protein coreceptor by facilitating ligand-induced receptor hetero-oligomerization.
Mol. Biol. Cell
PUBLISHED: 09-22-2010
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Cell surface heparan sulfate (HS) not only binds several major classes of growth factors but also sometimes potentiates their activities--an effect usually termed "coreception." A view that coreception is due to the stabilization of growth factor-receptor interactions has emerged primarily from studies of the fibroblast growth factors (FGFs). Recent in vivo studies have strongly suggested that HS also plays an important role in regulating signaling by the bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). Here, we provide evidence that the mechanism of coreception for BMPs is markedly different from that established for FGFs. First, we demonstrate a direct, stimulatory role for cell surface HS in the immediate signaling activities of BMP2 and BMP4, and we provide evidence that HS-BMP interactions are required for this effect. Next, using several independent assays of ligand binding and receptor assembly, including coimmunoprecipitation, cross-linking, and fluorescence fluctuation microscopy, we show that HS does not affect BMP binding to type I receptor subunits but instead enhances the subsequent recruitment of type II receptor subunits to BMP-type I receptor complexes. This suggests a view of HS as a catalyst of the formation of signaling complexes, rather than as a stabilizer of growth factor binding.
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Spatial dynamics of multistage cell lineages in tissue stratification.
Biophys. J.
PUBLISHED: 05-05-2010
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In developing and self-renewing tissues, terminally differentiated (TD) cell types are typically specified through the actions of multistage cell lineages. Such lineages commonly include a stem cell and multiple progenitor (transit-amplifying) cell stages, which ultimately give rise to TD cells. As the tissue reaches a tightly controlled steady-state size, cells at different lineage stages assume distinct spatial locations within the tissue. Although tissue stratification appears to be genetically specified, the underlying mechanisms that direct tissue lamination are not yet completely understood. Herein, we use modeling and simulations to explore several potential mechanisms that can be utilized to create stratification during developmental or regenerative growth in general systems and in the model system, the olfactory epithelium of mouse. Our results show that tissue stratification can be generated and maintained through controlling spatial distribution of diffusive signaling molecules that regulate the proliferation of each cell type within the lineage. The ability of feedback molecules to stratify a tissue is dependent on a low TD death rate: high death rates decrease tissue lamination. Regulation of the cell cycle lengths of stem cells by feedback signals can lead to transient accumulation of stem cells near the base and apex of tissue.
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The edges of understanding.
BMC Biol.
PUBLISHED: 04-08-2010
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A cultures icons are a window onto its soul. Few would disagree that, in the culture of molecular biology that dominated much of the life sciences for the last third of the 20th century, the dominant icon was the double helix. In the present, post-modern, systems biology era, however, it is, arguably, the hairball.
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Identifying gene regulatory networks in schizophrenia.
Neuroimage
PUBLISHED: 04-07-2010
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The imaging genetics approach to studying the genetic basis of disease leverages the individual strengths of both neuroimaging and genetic studies by visualizing and quantifying the brain activation patterns in the context of genetic background. Brain imaging as an intermediate phenotype can help clarify the functional link among genes, the molecular networks in which they participate, and brain circuitry and function. Integrating genetic data from a genome-wide association study (GWAS) with brain imaging as a quantitative trait (QT) phenotype can increase the statistical power to identify risk genes. A QT analysis using brain imaging (DLPFC activation during a working memory task) as a quantitative trait has identified unanticipated risk genes for schizophrenia. Several of these genes (RSRC1, ARHGAP18, ROBO1-ROBO2, GPC1, TNIK, and CTXN3-SLC12A2) have functions related to progenitor cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation, cytoskeleton reorganization, axonal connectivity, and development of forebrain structures. These genes, however, do not function in isolation but rather through gene regulatory networks. To obtain a deeper understanding how the GWAS-identified genes participate in larger gene regulatory networks, we measured correlations among transcript levels in the mouse and human postmortem tissue and performed a gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) that identified several microRNA associated with schizophrenia (448, 218, 137). The results of such computational approaches can be further validated in animal experiments in which the networks are experimentally studied and perturbed with specific compounds. Glypican 1 and FGF17 mouse models for example, can be used to study such gene regulatory networks. The model demonstrates epistatic interactions between FGF and glypican on brain development and may be a useful model of negative symptom schizophrenia.
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The measure of success: constraints, objectives, and tradeoffs in morphogen-mediated patterning.
Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol
PUBLISHED: 11-24-2009
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A large, diverse, and growing number of strategies have been proposed to explain how morphogen gradients achieve robustness and precision. We argue that, to be useful, the evaluation of such strategies must take into account the constraints imposed by competing objectives and performance tradeoffs. This point is illustrated through a mathematical and computational analysis of the strategy of self-enhanced morphogen clearance. The results suggest that the usefulness of this strategy comes less from its ability to increase robustness to morphogen source fluctuations per se, than from its ability to overcome specific kinds of noise, and to increase the fraction of a morphogen gradient within which robust threshold positions may be established. This work also provides new insights into the longstanding question of why morphogen gradients show a maximum range in vivo.
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The stem cell concept: is it holding us back?
J. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 09-21-2009
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Developmental biology, regenerative medicine and cancer biology are increasingly occupied with the molecular characterization of stem cells. Yet recent work adds to a growing body of literature suggesting that stemness cannot be reduced to the molecular features of cell types, and is instead an emergent property of cell lineages under feedback control.
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Follistatin modulates a BMP autoregulatory loop to control the size and patterning of sensory domains in the developing tongue.
Development
PUBLISHED: 05-27-2009
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The regenerative capacity of many placode-derived epithelial structures makes them of interest for understanding the molecular control of epithelial stem cells and their niches. Here, we investigate the interaction between the developing epithelium and its surrounding mesenchyme in one such system, the taste papillae and sensory taste buds of the mouse tongue. We identify follistatin (FST) as a mesenchymal factor that controls size, patterning and gustatory cell differentiation in developing taste papillae. FST limits expansion and differentiation of Sox2-expressing taste progenitor cells and negatively regulates the development of taste papillae in the lingual epithelium: in Fst(-/-) tongue, there is both ectopic development of Sox2-expressing taste progenitors and accelerated differentiation of gustatory cells. Loss of Fst leads to elevated activity and increased expression of epithelial Bmp7; the latter effect is consistent with BMP7 positive autoregulation, a phenomenon we demonstrate directly. We show that FST and BMP7 influence the activity and expression of other signaling systems that play important roles in the development of taste papillae and taste buds. In addition, using computational modeling, we show how aberrations in taste papillae patterning in Fst(-/-) mice could result from disruption of an FST-BMP7 regulatory circuit that normally suppresses noise in a process based on diffusion-driven instability. Because inactivation of Bmp7 rescues many of the defects observed in Fst(-/-) tongue, we conclude that interactions between mesenchyme-derived FST and epithelial BMP7 play a central role in the morphogenesis, innervation and maintenance of taste buds and their stem/progenitor cells.
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Multiple organ system defects and transcriptional dysregulation in the Nipbl(+/-) mouse, a model of Cornelia de Lange Syndrome.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 05-06-2009
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Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is a multi-organ system birth defects disorder linked, in at least half of cases, to heterozygous mutations in the NIPBL gene. In animals and fungi, orthologs of NIPBL regulate cohesin, a complex of proteins that is essential for chromosome cohesion and is also implicated in DNA repair and transcriptional regulation. Mice heterozygous for a gene-trap mutation in Nipbl were produced and exhibited defects characteristic of CdLS, including small size, craniofacial anomalies, microbrachycephaly, heart defects, hearing abnormalities, delayed bone maturation, reduced body fat, behavioral disturbances, and high mortality (75-80%) during the first weeks of life. These phenotypes arose despite a decrease in Nipbl transcript levels of only approximately 30%, implying extreme sensitivity of development to small changes in Nipbl activity. Gene expression profiling demonstrated that Nipbl deficiency leads to modest but significant transcriptional dysregulation of many genes. Expression changes at the protocadherin beta (Pcdhb) locus, as well as at other loci, support the view that NIPBL influences long-range chromosomal regulatory interactions. In addition, evidence is presented that reduced expression of genes involved in adipogenic differentiation may underlie the low amounts of body fat observed both in Nipbl+/- mice and in individuals with CdLS.
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Feedback regulation in multistage cell lineages.
Math Biosci Eng
PUBLISHED: 03-19-2009
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Studies of developing and self-renewing tissues have shown that differentiated cell types are typically specified through the actions of multistage cell lineages. Such lineages commonly include a stem cell and multiple progenitor (transit amplifying; TA) cell stages, which ultimately give rise to terminally differentiated (TD) cells. In several cases, self-renewal and differentiation of stem and progenitor cells within such lineages have been shown to be under feedback regulation. Together, the existence of multiple cell stages within a lineage and complex feedback regulation are thought to confer upon a tissue the ability to autoregulate development and regeneration, in terms of both cell number (total tissue volume) and cell identity (the proportions of different cell types, especially TD cells, within the tissue). In this paper, we model neurogenesis in the olfactory epithelium (OE) of the mouse, a system in which the lineage stages and mediators of feedback regulation that govern the generation of terminally differentiated olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) have been the subject of much experimental work. Here we report on the existence and uniqueness of steady states in this system, as well as local and global stability of these steady states. In particular, we identify parameter conditions for the stability of the system when negative feedback loops are represented either as Hill functions, or in more general terms. Our results suggest that two factors -- autoregulation of the proliferation of transit amplifying (TA) progenitor cells, and a low death rate of TD cells -- enhance the stability of this system.
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Foxg1 promotes olfactory neurogenesis by antagonizing Gdf11.
Development
PUBLISHED: 03-18-2009
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Foxg1, a winged-helix transcription factor, promotes the development of anterior neural structures; in mice lacking Foxg1, development of the cerebral hemispheres and olfactory epithelium (OE) is severely reduced. It has been suggested that Foxg1 acts by positively regulating the expression of growth factors, such as Fgf8, which support neurogenesis. However, Foxg1 also binds Smad transcriptional complexes, allowing it to negatively regulate the effects of TGFbeta family ligands. Here, we provide evidence that this latter effect explains much of the ability of Foxg1 to drive neurogenesis in the OE. We show that Foxg1 is expressed in developing OE at the same time as the gene encoding growth differentiation factor 11 (Gdf11), a TGFbeta family member that mediates negative-feedback control of OE neurogenesis. Mutations in Gdf11 rescue, to a considerable degree, the major defects in Foxg1(-/-) OE, including the early, severe loss of neural precursors and olfactory receptor neurons, and the subsequent collapse of both neurogenesis and nasal cavity formation. Rescue is gene-dosage dependent, with loss of even one allele of Gdf11 restoring substantial neurogenesis. Notably, we find no evidence for a disruption of Fgf8 expression in Foxg1(-/-) OE. However, we do observe both a failure of expression of follistatin (Fst), which encodes a secreted Gdf11 antagonist normally expressed in and around OE, and an increase in the expression of Gdf11 itself within the remaining OE in these mutants. Fst expression is rescued in Foxg1(-/-);Gdf11(-/-) and Foxg1(-/-);Gdf11(+/-) mice. These data suggest that the influence of Foxg1 on Gdf11-mediated negative feedback of neurogenesis may be both direct and indirect. In addition, defects in development of the cerebral hemispheres in Foxg1(-/-) mice are not rescued by mutations in Gdf11, nor is Gdf11 expressed at high levels within these structures. Thus, the pro-neurogenic effects of Foxg1 are likely to be mediated through different signaling pathways in different parts of the nervous system.
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Glypican-1 controls brain size through regulation of fibroblast growth factor signaling in early neurogenesis.
Neural Dev
PUBLISHED: 03-13-2009
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Cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) act as co-receptors for multiple families of growth factors that regulate animal cell proliferation, differentiation and patterning. Elimination of heparan sulfate during brain development is known to produce severe structural abnormalities. Here we investigate the developmental role played by one particular HSPG, glypican-1 (Gpc1), which is especially abundant on neuronal cell membranes, and is the major HSPG of the adult rodent brain.
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Cell lineages and the logic of proliferative control.
PLoS Biol.
PUBLISHED: 01-27-2009
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It is widely accepted that the growth and regeneration of tissues and organs is tightly controlled. Although experimental studies are beginning to reveal molecular mechanisms underlying such control, there is still very little known about the control strategies themselves. Here, we consider how secreted negative feedback factors ("chalones") may be used to control the output of multistage cell lineages, as exemplified by the actions of GDF11 and activin in a self-renewing neural tissue, the mammalian olfactory epithelium (OE). We begin by specifying performance objectives-what, precisely, is being controlled, and to what degree-and go on to calculate how well different types of feedback configurations, feedback sensitivities, and tissue architectures achieve control. Ultimately, we show that many features of the OE-the number of feedback loops, the cellular processes targeted by feedback, even the location of progenitor cells within the tissue-fit with expectations for the best possible control. In so doing, we also show that certain distinctions that are commonly drawn among cells and molecules-such as whether a cell is a stem cell or transit-amplifying cell, or whether a molecule is a growth inhibitor or stimulator-may be the consequences of control, and not a reflection of intrinsic differences in cellular or molecular character.
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Dynamics and precision in retinoic acid morphogen gradients.
Curr. Opin. Genet. Dev.
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Retinoic acid (RA) regulates many cellular behaviors during embryonic development and adult homeostasis. Like other morphogens, RA forms gradients through the use of localized sources and sinks, feedback, and interactions with other signals; this has been particularly well studied in the context of hindbrain segmentation in vertebrate embryos. Yet, as a small lipophilic molecule derived from a dietary source-vitamin A-RA differs markedly from better-studied polypeptide morphogens in its mechanisms of transport, signaling, and removal. Computational models suggest that the distinctive features of RA gradients make them particularly robust to large perturbations. Such features include combined positive and negative feedback effects via intracellular fatty acid binding proteins and RA-degrading enzymes. Here, we discuss how these features, together with feedback interactions among RA target genes, help enable RA to specify multiple, accurate pattern elements in the developing hindbrain, despite operating in an environment of high cellular and biochemical uncertainty and noise.
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A reaction-diffusion mechanism influences cell lineage progression as a basis for formation, regeneration, and stability of intestinal crypts.
BMC Syst Biol
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Colon crypts, a single sheet of epithelia cells, consist of a periodic pattern of stem cells, transit-amplifying cells, and terminally differentiated cells that constantly renew and turnover. Experimental evidence suggests that Wnt signaling promotes and regulates stem cell division, differentiation, and possible cell migrations while intestinal BMP signaling inhibits stem cell self-renewal and repression in crypt formation. As more molecular details on Wnt and BMP in crypts are being discovered, little is still known about how complex interactions among Wnt, BMP, and different types of cells, and surrounding environments may lead to de novo formation of multiple crypts or how such interactions affect regeneration and stability of crypts.
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Cellular retinoic acid-binding proteins are essential for hindbrain patterning and signal robustness in zebrafish.
Development
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The vitamin A derivative retinoic acid (RA) is a morphogen that patterns the anterior-posterior axis of the vertebrate hindbrain. Cellular retinoic acid-binding proteins (Crabps) transport RA within cells to both its nuclear receptors (RARs) and degrading enzymes (Cyp26s). However, mice lacking Crabps are viable, suggesting that Crabp functions are redundant with those of other fatty acid-binding proteins. Here we show that Crabps in zebrafish are essential for posterior patterning of the hindbrain and that they provide a key feedback mechanism that makes signaling robust as they are able to compensate for changes in RA production. Of the four zebrafish Crabps, Crabp2a is uniquely RA inducible and depletion or overexpression of Crabp2a makes embryos hypersensitive to exogenous RA. Computational models confirm that Crabp2a improves robustness within a narrow concentration range that optimizes a robustness index, integrating spatial information along the RA morphogen gradient. Exploration of signaling parameters in our models suggests that the ability of Crabp2a to transport RA to Cyp26 enzymes for degradation is a major factor in promoting robustness. These results demonstrate a previously unrecognized requirement for Crabps in RA signaling and hindbrain development, as well as a novel mechanism for stabilizing morphogen gradients despite genetic or environmental fluctuations in morphogen availability.
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Spatiotemporal network motif reveals the biological traits of developmental gene regulatory networks in Drosophila melanogaster.
BMC Syst Biol
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Network motifs provided a "conceptual tool" for understanding the functional principles of biological networks, but such motifs have primarily been used to consider static network structures. Static networks, however, cannot be used to reveal time- and region-specific traits of biological systems. To overcome this limitation, we proposed the concept of a "spatiotemporal network motif," a spatiotemporal sequence of network motifs of sub-networks which are active only at specific time points and body parts.
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Free extracellular diffusion creates the Dpp morphogen gradient of the Drosophila wing disc.
Curr. Biol.
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How morphogen gradients form has long been a subject of controversy. The strongest support for the view that morphogens do not simply spread by free diffusion has come from a variety of studies of the Decapentaplegic (Dpp) gradient of the Drosophila larval wing disc.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.