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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Sirtuin 1 retards hyperphosphatemia-induced calcification of vascular smooth muscle cells.
Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 06-30-2011
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Arterial calcification is associated with cardiovascular disease as a complication of advanced atherosclerosis. Aged vascular cells manifest some morphological features of a senescent phenotype. Recent studies have demonstrated that mammalian sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a histone deacetylase, is an exciting target for cardiovascular disease management. Here, we investigated the role of SIRT1 in a calcification model of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs).
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[Molecular mechanism of vascular aging: impact of vascular smooth muscle cell calcification via cellular senescence].
Clin Calcium
PUBLISHED: 11-02-2010
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Atherosclerotic vascular damage associated with aging manifest several features, namely atherosis, sclerosis and calcified change, finally leading to cardiovascular (CV) events. Accumulating recent reports show the importance of cellular senescence in atherosclerogenesis; however, few reports have addressed whether cellular senescence is associated with smooth muscle cells (SMC) calcification. Recent report has demonstrated the association of senescent phenotypic change with osteoblastic trans-differentiation in VSMC. In addition, our new findings show that the possibility of dynamic action of sirtuin, which is well known as a longevity gene, as a negative regulator in the cellular senescence-related vascular calcification. Strategies how to manage senescent phenotypic change in VSMC may provide novel therapeutic opportunities for the prevention of vascular calcification.
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[A case of limbic encephalitis with small cell lung carcinoma in which the cognitive function improved and redeteriorated during tumor therapy].
Nihon Ronen Igakkai Zasshi
PUBLISHED: 03-27-2010
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We report the findings regarding a 70-year-old man with paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis. He presented with a chief complaint of inability to recall any events. He had been well until one month before admission, and then he abruptly began to show progressive amnesia. At admission, the patients score on the Revised Hasegawa Dementia Scale (HDS-R) showed a decline to 13/30, thus indicating the existence of severe disorientation and an impaired memory. The brain CT and EEG showed no specific abnormalities and an analysis of cerebrospinal fluid showed only a mild increase in the total protein level. A chest X-ray film revealed a mass in the right hilum, while a histological analysis of the biopsied specimen finally established a diagnosis of small cell lung carcinoma. The FDG-PET and the enhanced brain MRI showed a single small metastatic lesion in the cerebellum. After the 1st course of chemotherapy and whole brain radiation, cognitive function, especially the short-term memory, remarkably improved and the HDS-R score increased to 21/30. However, the tumor again increased in size during the 3(rd) and 4(th) courses of chemotherapy. Interestingly, cognitive function also worsened again and the score of HDS-R declined to 15/30, 20 weeks after the start of chemotherapy. Limbic encephalitis can be associated with malignant tumors, such as small cell lung carcinoma, and some reported cases have shown a cognitive improvement after tumor therapy. In our case, we also observed a reworsening of the cognitive function in association with the acquired chemoresistence.
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Expression of a cryptic secondary sigma factor gene unveils natural competence for DNA transformation in Staphylococcus aureus.
PLoS Pathog.
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It has long been a question whether Staphylococcus aureus, a major human pathogen, is able to develop natural competence for transformation by DNA. We previously showed that a novel staphylococcal secondary sigma factor, SigH, was a likely key component for competence development, but the corresponding gene appeared to be cryptic as its expression could not be detected during growth under standard laboratory conditions. Here, we have uncovered two distinct mechanisms allowing activation of SigH production in a minor fraction of the bacterial cell population. The first is a chromosomal gene duplication rearrangement occurring spontaneously at a low frequency [?10(-5)], generating expression of a new chimeric sigH gene. The second involves post-transcriptional regulation through an upstream inverted repeat sequence, effectively suppressing expression of the sigH gene. Importantly, we have demonstrated for the first time that S. aureus cells producing active SigH become competent for transformation by plasmid or chromosomal DNA, which requires the expression of SigH-controlled competence genes. Additionally, using DNA from the N315 MRSA strain, we successfully transferred the full length SCCmecII element through natural transformation to a methicillin-sensitive strain, conferring methicillin resistance to the resulting S. aureus transformants. Taken together, we propose a unique model for staphylococcal competence regulation by SigH that could help explain the acquisition of antibiotic resistance genes through horizontal gene transfer in this important pathogen.
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Clinicopathological features of centronuclear myopathy in Japanese populations harboring mutations in dynamin 2.
Clin Neurol Neurosurg
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Missense mutations in dynamin 2 gene (DNM2) are associated with autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy (CNM) with characteristic histopathological findings of centrally located myonuclei in a large number of muscle fibers.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.