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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Bio-electrospraying is a safe technology for delivering human adipose-derived stem cells.
Biotechnol. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 06-29-2014
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Bio-electrospraying (BES) is a technique for directly jetting living cells that has significant implications for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. However, the effect of BES on human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) remains unknown. Here, we show that an hASC suspension was successfully electrosprayed via a continuous, stable and linearly directed electrospray at 10 kV and at 3 ml/h. Morphological observations and Trypan Blue and CCK-8 assays revealed that the cells remained viable and proliferated at a rate similar to that of the controls (0 kV). However, at 20 kV, BES became unstable and cell viability was reduced. Moreover, hASCs electrosprayed at 10 kV retained their multilineage potential, successfully differentiating into chondrogenic, osteogenic and neurogenic lineages. Thus, BES does not significantly affect cell morphology, viability or multipotency.
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Characterization of nitrogen and water status in oat leaves using optical sensing approach.
J. Sci. Food Agric.
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2014
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Optical sensing is a potential tool to estimate plant N status, but soil water deficits may interefere with forming a clear relationship. A greenhouse study was conducted with oat plants treated with three water regimes and four N levels to determine whether optical sensing could be used to estimate leaf N and relative water content (RWC).
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Molecular characterizations of a novel putative DNA-binding protein LvDBP23 in marine shrimp L. vannamei tissues and molting stages.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-25-2011
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Litopenaeus Vannamei, well known as pacific white shrimp, is the most popular shrimp in the world shrimp market. Identification and characterization of shrimp muscle regulatory genes are not only important for shrimp genetic improvement, but also facilitate comparative genomic tools for understanding of muscle development and regeneration.
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Transgenic over-expression of growth differentiation factor 11 propeptide in skeleton results in transformation of the seventh cervical vertebra into a thoracic vertebra.
Mol. Reprod. Dev.
PUBLISHED: 11-05-2010
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Growth differentiation factor 11 (GDF11) is one of the significant genes that control skeletal formation. Knockout of GDF11 function causes abnormal patterning of the anterior/posterior axial skeleton. The mRNA of GDF11 is initially translated to a precursor protein that undergoes a proteolytic cleavage to generate the C-terminal peptide or mature GDF11, and the N-terminal peptide named GDF11 propeptide. The propeptide can antagonize GDF11 activity in vitro. To investigate the effects of GDF11 propeptide on GDF11 function in vivo, we generated transgenic mice that over-express the propeptide cDNA in skeletal tissue. The transgenic mice showed formation of extra ribs on the seventh cervical vertebra (C7) as a result of transformation of the C7 vertebra into a thoracic vertebra. The GDF11 propeptide transgene mRNA was detected in tail tissue in embryos and was highly expressed in tail and calvaria bones after birth. A high frequency of C7 rib formation was noticed in the transgenic mouse line with a high level of transgene expression. The anterior boundaries of Hoxa-4 and Hoxa-5 mRNA in situ expressions showed cranial shifts from their normal prevertebra locations in transgenic embryos. These results demonstrated significant effects of GDF11 propeptide transgene on vertebral formation, which are likely occurring through depressing GDF11 function and altered locations of Hoxa-4 and Hoxa-5 expression.
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Coordinated patterns of gene expressions for adult muscle build-up in transgenic mice expressing myostatin propeptide.
BMC Genomics
PUBLISHED: 07-08-2009
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Skeletal muscle growth and maintenance are essential for human health. One of the muscle regulatory genes, namely myostatin, a member of transforming growth factor-beta, plays a dominant role in the genetic control of muscle mass. Myostatin is synthesized as a precursor protein, which generates the N-terminal propeptide and the C-terminal mature myostatin peptide by a post-translational cleavage event. Previously, transgenic over-expression of myostatin propeptide in skeletal muscle results in significant muscle growth in early stages of development. The objectives of present study were to further characterize muscle growth in later stages of life and to identify genes and their expression patterns that are responsible for adult muscle build-up by myostatin propeptide.
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Identifications of SUMO-1 cDNA and its expression patterns in Pacific white shrimp Litopeanaeus vannamei.
Int. J. Biol. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 01-11-2009
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Small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMO) work in a similar way as ubiquitin to alter the biological properties of a target protein by conjugation. A shrimp SUMO cDNA named LvSUMO-1 was identified in Litopenaeus vannamei. LvSUMO-1 cDNA contains a coding sequence of 282 nucleotides with untranslated regions of 37 bp at 5-end and 347 bp at 3-end, respectively. The deduced 93 amino acids exhibit 83% identity with the Western Honeybee SUMO-1, and more than 65% homologies with human and mouse SUMO-1. LvSUMO-1 mRNA is expressed in most L. vannamei tissues with the highest level in hepatopancrease. The mRNA expression of LvSUMO-1 over development stages in L. Vammamei is distinguished by a low level in nauplius stage and relatively high level in postlarva stage with continuous expression until juvenile stage. The LvSUMO-1 protein and its conjugated proteins are detected in both cytoplasm and nucleus in several tissues. Interestingly, LvSUMO-1 mRNA levels are high in abdominal muscle during the premolt stage, wherein it has significant activities of protein degradation, suggesting its possible role in the regulation of shrimp muscle protein degradation.
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Decreased expression of calpain and calpastatin mRNA during development is highly correlated with muscle protein accumulation in neonatal pigs.
Comp. Biochem. Physiol., Part A Mol. Integr. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-10-2009
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It is well known that rapid gain of muscle mass in neonatal pigs is highly related to protein synthesis. However, the role of protein degradation in muscle gain of the neonatal period has not been well established. Calpains and their endogenous inhibitors, calpastatins, play a significant role in early-stage myofibrillar protein degradation. To investigate the role of calpain-calpastatin system in muscle protein accumulation, we studied the expressions of their mRNA in muscle tissue sampled at days 1, 4, 6, 12, 20 and 28 from a total of 36 neonatal pigs. The steady-state mRNA levels of calpains 1A, 2 and 3A, calpastatin types 1, 2 and 3, obtained by quantitative real-time PCR analysis, decreased by 2-4 folds at the age of 4 to 6 days compared to 1-day-old piglets. Then, the relatively low expression level was maintained through 28 days of age. Expressions of calpains 1A, 3A and calpastatin type 1 were significantly correlated with the measurements of muscle protein accumulations such as muscle protein content and RNA/protein ratio. Expressions of calpain 1A, calpastatin types 1 and 3 were negatively correlated with birth weight and fractional rate of growth. The levels of calpains 1A and 2 mRNA were correspondent to their protease activities. In conclusion, decreased levels of calpain and calpastatin expressions over development in neonatal pigs are associated with high protein accumulations, suggesting that dramatic muscle growth during the neonatal period may be partially controlled by down-regulated calpain-calpastatin system.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.