JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Proceedings of the first workshop on Peripheral Machine Interfaces: going beyond traditional surface electromyography.
Front Neurorobot
PUBLISHED: 08-15-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
One of the hottest topics in rehabilitation robotics is that of proper control of prosthetic devices. Despite decades of research, the state of the art is dramatically behind the expectations. To shed light on this issue, in June, 2013 the first international workshop on Present and future of non-invasive peripheral nervous system (PNS)-Machine Interfaces (MI; PMI) was convened, hosted by the International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics. The keyword PMI has been selected to denote human-machine interfaces targeted at the limb-deficient, mainly upper-limb amputees, dealing with signals gathered from the PNS in a non-invasive way, that is, from the surface of the residuum. The workshop was intended to provide an overview of the state of the art and future perspectives of such interfaces; this paper represents is a collection of opinions expressed by each and every researcher/group involved in it.
Related JoVE Video
Movement error rate for evaluation of machine learning methods for sEMG-based hand movement classification.
IEEE Trans Neural Syst Rehabil Eng
PUBLISHED: 01-29-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
There has been increasing interest in applying learning algorithms to improve the dexterity of myoelectric prostheses. In this work, we present a large-scale benchmark evaluation on the second iteration of the publicly released NinaPro database, which contains surface electromyography data for 6 DOF force activations as well as for 40 discrete hand movements. The evaluation involves a modern kernel method and compares performance of three feature representations and three kernel functions. Both the force regression and movement classification problems can be learned successfully when using a nonlinear kernel function, while the exp- ?(2) kernel outperforms the more popular radial basis function kernel in all cases. Furthermore, combining surface electromyography and accelerometry in a multimodal classifier results in significant increases in accuracy as compared to when either modality is used individually. Since window-based classification accuracy should not be considered in isolation to estimate prosthetic controllability, we also provide results in terms of classification mistakes and prediction delay. To this extent, we propose the movement error rate as an alternative to the standard window-based accuracy. This error rate is insensitive to prediction delays and it allows us therefore to quantify mistakes and delays as independent performance characteristics. This type of analysis confirms that the inclusion of accelerometry is superior, as it results in fewer mistakes while at the same time reducing prediction delay.
Related JoVE Video
Stable myoelectric control of a hand prosthesis using non-linear incremental learning.
Front Neurorobot
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Stable myoelectric control of hand prostheses remains an open problem. The only successful human-machine interface is surface electromyography, typically allowing control of a few degrees of freedom. Machine learning techniques may have the potential to remove these limitations, but their performance is thus far inadequate: myoelectric signals change over time under the influence of various factors, deteriorating control performance. It is therefore necessary, in the standard approach, to regularly retrain a new model from scratch. We hereby propose a non-linear incremental learning method in which occasional updates with a modest amount of novel training data allow continual adaptation to the changes in the signals. In particular, Incremental Ridge Regression and an approximation of the Gaussian Kernel known as Random Fourier Features are combined to predict finger forces from myoelectric signals, both finger-by-finger and grouped in grasping patterns. We show that the approach is effective and practically applicable to this problem by first analyzing its performance while predicting single-finger forces. Surface electromyography and finger forces were collected from 10 intact subjects during four sessions spread over two different days; the results of the analysis show that small incremental updates are indeed effective to maintain a stable level of performance. Subsequently, we employed the same method on-line to teleoperate a humanoid robotic arm equipped with a state-of-the-art commercial prosthetic hand. The subject could reliably grasp, carry and release everyday-life objects, enforcing stable grasping irrespective of the signal changes, hand/arm movements and wrist pronation and supination.
Related JoVE Video
Exploiting accelerometers to improve movement classification for prosthetics.
IEEE Int Conf Rehabil Robot
PUBLISHED: 11-05-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Recent studies have explored the integration of additional input modalities to improve myoelectric control of prostheses. Arm dynamics in particular are an interesting option, as these can be measured easily by means of accelerometers. In this work, the benefit of accelerometer signals is demonstrated on a large scale movement classification task, consisting of 40 hand and wrist movements obtained from 20 subjects. The results demonstrate that the accelerometer modality is indeed highly informative and even outperforms surface electromyography in terms of classification accuracy. The highest accuracy, however, is obtained when both modalities are integrated in a multi-modal classifier.
Related JoVE Video
Learning Categories from Few Examples with Multi Model Knowledge Transfer.
IEEE Trans Pattern Anal Mach Intell
PUBLISHED: 10-09-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Learning a visual object category from few samples is a compelling and challenging problem. In several real-world applications collecting many annotated data is costly and not always possible. However a small training set does not allow to cover the high intraclass variability typical of visual objects. In this condition, machine learning methods provide very few guarantees. This paper presents a discriminative model adaptation algorithm able to proficiently learn a target object with few examples by relying on other previously learned source categories. The proposed method autonomously chooses from where and how much to transfer information by solving a convex optimization problem which ensures to have the minimal leave-one-out error on the available training set. We analyze several properties of the described approach and perform an extensive experimental comparison with other existing transfer solutions, consistently showing the value of our algorithm.
Related JoVE Video
On the challenge of classifying 52 hand movements from surface electromyography.
Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The level of dexterity of myoelectric hand prostheses depends to large extent on the feature representation and subsequent classification of surface electromyography signals. This work presents a comparison of various feature extraction and classification methods on a large-scale surface electromyography database containing 52 different hand movements obtained from 27 subjects. Results indicate that simple feature representations as Mean Absolute Value and Waveform Length can achieve similar performance to the computationally more demanding marginal Discrete Wavelet Transform. With respect to classifiers, the Support Vector Machine was found to be the only method that consistently achieved top performance in combination with each feature extraction method.
Related JoVE Video
Experiences in the creation of an electromyography database to help hand amputated persons.
Stud Health Technol Inform
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Currently, trans-radial amputees can only perform a few simple movements with prosthetic hands. This is mainly due to low control capabilities and the long training time that is required to learn controlling them with surface electromyography (sEMG). This is in contrast with recent advances in mechatronics, thanks to which mechanical hands have multiple degrees of freedom and in some cases force control. To help improve the situation, we are building the NinaPro (Non-Invasive Adaptive Prosthetics) database, a database of about 50 hand and wrist movements recorded from several healthy and currently very few amputated persons that will help the community to test and improve sEMG-based natural control systems for prosthetic hands. In this paper we describe the experimental experiences and practical aspects related to the data acquisition.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.