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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Vitamins And Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.
Endocr Metab Immune Disord Drug Targets
PUBLISHED: 04-02-2014
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The present review evaluates the relationship between type 2 diabetes mellitus and individual or combined vitamins. Antioxidant vitamins A, C and E are found decreased in diabetic subjects, possibly due an increased need to control the excessive oxidative stress produced by abnormalities in glucose metabolism. On the other hand, retinol binding protein exerts a modulating effect, as it has adipokine functions. With respect to the B group vitamins, thiamin, pyridoxine and biotin have been found decreased but the mechanisms are not clear, however supplementation has shown some improvement of the metabolic control in diabetic patients. The absorption of folic acid and vitamin B12 is importantly decreased by the prolongued use of metformin, which is the first choice drug in uncomplicated diabetes, thus these two nutrients have been found deficient in the disease and most probably need to be supplemented regularly. On the other hand, vitamin D is considered a risk factor for the development of diabetes as well as its complications, particularly cardiovascular ones. Although some studies have found an association of vitamin K intake with glucose metabolism further research is needed. Studies on the use of multivitamin supplements have shown unconclusive results. After reviewing the evidence, no real recommendation on the use of vitamin supplements in type 2 diabetes mellitus can be issued, however patients using metformin during prolongued periods may need folic acid and vitamin B12.
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Type 2 diabetes, PUFAs, and vitamin D: their relation to inflammation.
J Immunol Res
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2014
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Chronic diseases have become one of the most important public health problems, due to their high costs for treatment and prevention. Until now, researchers have considered that the etiology of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is multifactorial. Recently, the study of the innate immune system has offered an explanation model of the pathogenesis of T2DM. On the other hand, there is evidence about the beneficial effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) n-3 and n-6 in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases including diabetes. Furthermore, high vitamin D plasmatic concentrations have been associated with the best performance of pancreatic ? cells and the improving of this disease. In conclusion, certain fatty acids in the adequate proportion as well as 25-hydroxivitamin D can modulate the inflammatory response in diabetic people, modifying the evolution of this disease.
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[The most prevalent environmental risk factors in respiratory suncytial virus bronchiolitis in infants from 0 to 24 months in a seasonal study performed in two hospitals].
Enferm Clin
PUBLISHED: 02-23-2013
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Our aim is to describe the environmental aspects of children between 0 and 24 months, who arrived in the Emergency Department of the Hospital General de Cataluña and Hospital Parc Tauli (both within Barcelona province), and were diagnosed with respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis from November 2010 to February 2011.
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Repeated restraint stress reduces the number of IgA-producing cells in Peyers patches.
Neuroimmunomodulation
PUBLISHED: 01-06-2011
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The few reports that have analyzed the effects of stress on the immune cells of the intestinal mucosa or the functions of these cells have tended to focus on S-IgA levels in saliva, and these studies have shown contradictory results. The principal objective of this study was to analyze the effects of repeated restraint stress on the number and distribution of immune cells in Peyers patches (PPs) as well as the effects of glucocorticoid and catecholamine administration on the same stress-related parameters. Upon analyzing the effect of repeated restraint stress on PPs, it was found that there was no modification in the morphological structure of the PPs but that restraint stress reduced the total number of lymphocytes and the number of CD8+ T cells, B cells, and plasma cells in PPs. Only at the site of PPs where IgA-producing plasma cells are most numerous (the dome) was a decrease found in this type of cell. These effects were due at least in part to the effect of glucocorticoids and catecholamines. Since IgA produced in PPs is a natural antibody that impedes bacterial infections, repeated stress may favor the entry of pathogens through the intestine.
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Diet, exercise and gut mucosal immunity.
Proc Nutr Soc
PUBLISHED: 09-22-2010
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Diet and exercise are primary strategies recommended for the control of the obesity epidemic. Considerable attention is being paid to the effect of both on the immune system. However, little research has been done on the effect of diet, nutrients or exercise on the mucosal immune system. The gastrointestinal tract (gut) is not only responsible for the entry of nutrients into the organism, but also for triggering the primary immune response to orally ingested antigens. The gut-associated lymphoid tissue contains a large amount of immune cells, disseminated all along the intestine in Peyers patches and lamina propria. Specific nutrients or their combinations, as well as the microflora, are capable of modulating the immune system through cell activation, production of signalling molecules or gene expression. We have observed an increase in T-cells as well as a decrease in B-cells from Peyers patches, induced by diets high in fats or carbohydrates in Balb/c mice. It has also been demonstrated that exercise modulates the immune system, where moderate levels may improve its function by increasing the proliferation of lymphocytes from various sites, including gut-associated lymphoid tissue, whereas exhaustive acute exercise may cause immunosuppression. High-fat diets combined with exercise are able to induce an increase in CD3+ lymphocytes due to increased CD8+ cells and a decrease in B-cells. Explanations and consequences of the effects of diet and exercise on the gut mucosal immunity are still being explored.
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The microstructure of white matter in male to female transsexuals before cross-sex hormonal treatment. A DTI study.
J Psychiatr Res
PUBLISHED: 09-03-2010
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Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been shown to be sensitive in detecting white matter differences between sexes. Before cross-sex hormone treatment female to male transsexuals (FtM) differ from females but not from males in several brain fibers. The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether white matter patterns in male to female (MtF) transsexuals before commencing cross-sex hormone treatment are also more similar to those of their biological sex or whether they are more similar to those of their gender identity.
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White matter microstructure in female to male transsexuals before cross-sex hormonal treatment. A diffusion tensor imaging study.
J Psychiatr Res
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2010
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Some gray and white matter regions of the brain are sexually dimorphic. The best MRI technique for identifying subtle differences in white matter is diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether white matter patterns in female to male (FtM) transsexuals before commencing cross-sex hormone treatment are more similar to that of their biological sex or to that of their gender identity.
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Cortical activation during mental rotation in male-to-female and female-to-male transsexuals under hormonal treatment.
Psychoneuroendocrinology
PUBLISHED: 02-08-2010
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There is strong evidence of sex differences in mental rotation tasks. Transsexualism is an extreme gender identity disorder in which individuals seek cross-gender treatment to change their sex. The aim of our study was to investigate if male-to-female (MF) and female-to-male (FM) transsexuals receiving cross-sex hormonal treatment have different patterns of cortical activation during a three-dimensional (3D) mental rotation task. An fMRI study was performed using a 3-T scan in a sample of 18 MF and 19 FM under chronic cross-sex hormonal treatment. Twenty-three males and 19 females served as controls. The general pattern of cerebral activation seen while visualizing the rotated and non-rotated figures was similar for all four groups showing strong occipito-parieto-frontal brain activation. However, compared to control males, the activation of MF transsexuals during the task was lower in the superior parietal lobe. Compared to control females, MF transsexuals showed higher activation in orbital and right dorsolateral prefrontal regions and lower activation in the left prefrontal gyrus. FM transsexuals did not differ from either the MF transsexual or control groups. Regression analyses between cerebral activation and the number of months of hormonal treatment showed a significant negative correlation in parietal, occipital and temporal regions in the MF transsexuals. No significant correlations with time were seen in the FM transsexuals. In conclusion, although we did not find a specific pattern of cerebral activation in the FM transsexuals, we have identified a specific pattern of cerebral activation during a mental 3D rotation task in MF transsexuals under cross-sex hormonal treatment that differed from control males in the parietal region and from control females in the orbital prefrontal region. The hypoactivation in MF transsexuals in the parietal region could be due to the hormonal treatment or could reflect a priori cerebral differences between MF transsexual and control subjects.
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Are immunoglobulin concentrations associated with the body composition of adolescents?
Hum. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 06-10-2009
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The aim of this study was to analyze the association between serum concentrations of immunoglobulins (Ig) A, G, and M and body composition of adolescents from Mexico. Informed consent was obtained from parents and assent was obtained from the adolescents for the evaluation of 125 adolescents from the Capital city of Toluca and the adjacent semiurban county of Lerma de Villada. Height, weight, waist, and hip circumference were measured by trained personnel. Body mass index and waist:hip ratio were calculated from these measurements, whereas body fat (BF) was calculated from tricipital and subscapular skinfolds and measured by bioelectrical impedance. Serum concentrations of Ig were determined by nephelometry. Data were analyzed by independent samples t test and Pearson correlations. Subjects were mainly females (71.2%), with a mean age of 16.8 years (+/-0.8). No differences were reported in all indicators by weight or BF between gender. Female participants had higher Ig concentrations than males (IgG t = 2.24, p = 0.027; IgA t = 2.05, p = 0.043; IgM t = 4.49, p < 0.001). Positive correlations were reported for IgA and IgM with tricipital skinfold (r = 0.192, p = 0.041; and r = 0.221, p = 0.018, respectively) and for total BF by bioimpedance (r = 0.243, p = 0.009). Ig concentrations do not seem to be affected by overweight, obesity, or excessive or central BF in adolescents.
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The effects of partial and complete masculinization on the sexual differentiation of nuclei that control lordotic behavior in the male rat.
Behav. Brain Res.
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2009
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Male rats, under certain experimental conditions, may show lordosis, the typical expression of female sexual receptivity. This work studies the sexual morphological pattern of facilitatory and inhibitory structures that control lordosis. Three groups of males were neonatally subjected to a gradient of androgen exposure (castrated plus injected oil (GxM+oil); castrated plus androstenedione treated (GxM+AND); and sham operated [CM]); a group of control females (CF) was also added. Lordotic response after these different hormonal and neonatal surgical treatments, as well as the volume or number of neurons in facilitatory (ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus [VMN]) and inhibitory (the intermediate region of the lateral septum [LSi] and accessory olfactory bulb [AOB]) nuclei involved in lordosis was studied in adults. The inhibition of lordosis in the males seems to be associated to the neonatal presence of testosterone and the consequent masculinization of the VMN, VMNvl, LSi and AOB. It is suggested that one of the functions of the sex differences consistently seen in these structures might be to inhibit the lordosis response in the male.
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Cortical thickness in untreated transsexuals.
Cereb. Cortex
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Sex differences in cortical thickness (CTh) have been extensively investigated but as yet there are no reports on CTh in transsexuals. Our aim was to determine whether the CTh pattern in transsexuals before hormonal treatment follows their biological sex or their gender identity. We performed brain magnetic resonance imaging on 94 subjects: 24 untreated female-to-male transsexuals (FtMs), 18 untreated male-to-female transsexuals (MtFs), and 29 male and 23 female controls in a 3-T TIM-TRIO Siemens scanner. T1-weighted images were analyzed to obtain CTh and volumetric subcortical measurements with FreeSurfer software. CTh maps showed control females have thicker cortex than control males in the frontal and parietal regions. In contrast, males have greater right putamen volume. FtMs had a similar CTh to control females and greater CTh than males in the parietal and temporal cortices. FtMs had larger right putamen than females but did not differ from males. MtFs did not differ in CTh from female controls but had greater CTh than control males in the orbitofrontal, insular, and medial occipital regions. In conclusion, FtMs showed evidence of subcortical gray matter masculinization, while MtFs showed evidence of CTh feminization. In both types of transsexuals, the differences with respect to their biological sex are located in the right hemisphere.
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Effects of androgenization on the white matter microstructure of female-to-male transsexuals. A diffusion tensor imaging study.
Psychoneuroendocrinology
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Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can sensitively detect white matter sex differences and the effects of pharmacological treatments. Before cross-sex hormone treatment, the white matter microstructure of several brain bundles in female-to-male transsexuals (FtMs) differs from those in females but not from that in males. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether cross-sex hormone treatment (androgenization) affects the brain white matter microstructure. Using a Siemens 3 T Trio Tim Magneton, DTI was performed twice, before and during cross-sex hormonal treatment with testosterone in 15 FtMs scanned. Fractional anisotropy (FA) was analyzed on white matter of the whole brain, and the latter was spatially analyzed using Tract-Based Spatial Statistics. Before each scan the subjects were assessed for serum testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin level (SHBG), and their free testosterone index. After at least seven months of cross-gender hormonal treatment, FA values increased in the right superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) and the right corticospinal tract (CST) in FtMs compared to their pre-treatment values. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that the increments in the FA values in the SLF and CST are predicted by the free testosterone index before hormonal treatment. All these observations suggest that testosterone treatment changes white matter microstructure in FtMs.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.