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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Safety and Effectiveness of Combination Antiretroviral Therapy during the First Year of Treatment in HIV-1 Infected Rwandan Children: A Prospective Study.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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With increased availability of paediatric combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in resource limited settings, cART outcomes and factors associated with outcomes should be assessed.
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"Let's talk about sex": a qualitative study of Rwandan adolescents' views on sex and HIV.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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This qualitative study explored the views and experiences of adolescents with perinatally acquired HIV in Kigali, Rwanda, regarding sex, love, marriage, children and hope for the future.
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Feasibility and safety of ALVAC-HIV vCP1521 vaccine in HIV-exposed infants in Uganda: results from the first HIV vaccine trial in infants in Africa.
J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr.
PUBLISHED: 06-26-2013
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The development of a safe and effective vaccine against HIV type 1 for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV would significantly advance the goal of eliminating HIV infection in children. Safety and feasibility results from phase 1, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of ALVAC-HIV vCP1521 in infants born to HIV type 1-infected women in Uganda are reported.
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Antiretroviral therapy drug adherence in Rwanda: perspectives from patients and healthcare workers using a mixed-methods approach.
AIDS Care
PUBLISHED: 03-21-2013
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Rwanda has achieved high enrollment into antiretroviral therapy (ART) programs but data on adherence after enrollment are not routinely collected. We used a mixed-methods approach (standardized questionnaires, pill counts, focus group discussions, and in-depth interviews) to determine levels of and barriers to ART adherence from the perspective of both patients and healthcare workers (HCW). Data were available from 213 patients throughout the first year on ART; 58 of them and 23 HCW participated in a qualitative sub-study. Self-reported adherence was high (96% of patients reporting more than 95% adherence), but adherence by pill count was significantly lower, especially in the first 3 months. In the standardized interviews, patients mostly reported that they "simply forgot" or "were away from home" as reasons for nonadherence. The qualitative research identified three interrelated constructs that appeared to negatively influence adherence: stigma, difficulty coming to terms with illness, and concealment of illness. Both standardized questionnaires and the qualitative research identified poverty, disruption to daily routines, factors related to regimen complexity and side effects, and service-related factors as barriers to adherence. We conclude that regular triangulation of different sources of adherence data is desirable to arrive at more realistic estimates. We propose that program monitoring and evaluation cycles incorporate more in-depth research to better understand concerns underlying reasons for nonadherence reported in routine monitoring.
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Living situation affects adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected adolescents in Rwanda: a qualitative study.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-21-2013
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Adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) is vital for HIV-infected adolescents for survival and quality of life. However, this age group faces many challenges to remain adherent. We used multiple data sources (role-play, focus group discussions (FGD), and in-depth interviews (IDI)) to better understand adherence barriers for Rwandan adolescents. Forty-two HIV positive adolescents (ages 12-21) and a selection of their primary caregivers were interviewed. All were perinatally-infected and received (cART) for ? 12 months. Topics discussed during FGDs and IDIs included learning HIV status, disclosure and stigma, care and treatment issues, cART adherence barriers.
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Low primary and secondary HIV drug-resistance after 12 months of antiretroviral therapy in human immune-deficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals from Kigali, Rwanda.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Treatment outcomes of HIV patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Rwanda are scarcely documented. HIV viral load (VL) and HIV drug-resistance (HIVDR) outcomes at month 12 were determined in a prospective cohort study of antiretroviral-naïve HIV patients initiating first-line therapy in Kigali. Treatment response was monitored clinically and by regular CD4 counts and targeted HIV viral load (VL) to confirm drug failure. VL measurements and HIVDR genotyping were performed retrospectively on baseline and month 12 samples. One hundred and fifty-eight participants who completed their month 12 follow-up visit had VL data available at month 12. Most of them (88%) were virologically suppressed (VL?1000 copies/mL) but 18 had virological failure (11%), which is in the range of WHO-suggested targets for HIVDR prevention. If only CD4 criteria had been used to classify treatment response, 26% of the participants would have been misclassified as treatment failure. Pre-therapy HIVDR was documented in 4 of 109 participants (3.6%) with an HIVDR genotyping results at baseline. Eight of 12 participants (66.7%) with virological failure and HIVDR genotyping results at month 12 were found to harbor mutation(s), mostly NNRTI resistance mutations, whereas 4 patients had no HIVDR mutations. Almost half (44%) of the participants initiated ART at CD4 count ?200 cell/µl and severe CD4 depletion at baseline (<50 cells/µl) was associated with virological treatment failure (p?=?0.008). Although the findings may not be generalizable to all HIV patients in Rwanda, our data suggest that first-line ART regimen changes are currently not warranted. However, the accumulation of acquired HIVDR mutations in some participants underscores the need to reinforce HIVDR prevention strategies, such as increasing the availability and appropriate use of VL testing to monitor ART response, ensuring high quality adherence counseling, and promoting earlier identification of HIV patients and enrollment into HIV care and treatment programs.
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High seroprevalence of HBV and HCV infection in HIV-infected adults in Kigali, Rwanda.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Data on prevalence and incidence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in Rwanda are scarce.
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Early Weaning of HIV-Exposed Uninfected Infants and Risk of Serious Gastroenteritis: Findings from Two Perinatal HIV Prevention Trials in Kampala, Uganda.
J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr.
PUBLISHED: 09-26-2009
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OBJECTIVE:: To assess serious gastroenteritis risk and mortality associated with early cessation of breastfeeding in infants enrolled in 2 prevention of maternal-to-child HIV-transmission trials in Uganda. METHODS:: We used hazard rates to evaluate serious gastroenteritis events by month of age and mortality among HIV-exposed uninfected infants enrolled in the HIV Network for Prevention Trials (HIVNET 012) (1997-2001) and HIV hyperimmune globulin (HIVIGLOB)/nevirapine (NVP) (2004-2007) trials. HIV-infected mothers were counseled using local infant feeding guidelines current at the time. RESULTS:: Breastfeeding cessation occurred earlier in HIVIGLOB/NVP compared with HIVNET 012 (median 4.0 versus 9.3 months, P < 0.001). Rates of serious gastroenteritis were higher in HIVIGLOB/NVP (8.0/1000 child-months) than in HIVNET 012 (3.1/1000 child-months; P < 0.001). Serious gastroenteritis events also peaked earlier at 3-4 and 7-8 months (16.2/1000 and 15.0/1000 child-months, respectively) compared with HIVNET 012 at 9-10 months (20.8/1000 child-months). All cause infant mortality did not statistically differ between the HIVIGLOB/NVP and the HIVNET 012 trials [3.2/1000 versus 2.0/1000 child-months, respectively (P = 0.10)]. CONCLUSIONS:: Early breastfeeding cessation seen in the HIVIGLOB/NVP trial was associated with increased risk of serious gastroenteritis among HIV-exposed uninfected infants when compared with later breastfeeding cessation in the HIVNET 012 trial. Testing interventions, which could decrease HIV transmission through breastfeeding and allow safe breastfeeding into the second year of life, are urgently needed.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.