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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
The impact of a standardized consultation form for facial trauma on billing and evaluation and management levels.
Ann Plast Surg
PUBLISHED: 09-23-2014
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Facial trauma is among the most frequent consultations encountered by plastic surgeons. Unfortunately, the reimbursement from these consultations can be low, and qualified plastic surgeons may exclude facial trauma from their practice. An audit of our records found insufficient documentation to justify higher evaluation and management (EM) levels of service resulting in lower reimbursement. Utilizing a standardized consultation form can improve documentation resulting in higher billing and EM levels.
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Facelifting: anatomical considerations.
Facial Plast Surg
PUBLISHED: 07-30-2014
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Facelifting techniques continue to evolve as our understanding of facial aging improves. Improved technology to affect changes on skin for tightening and volume restoration with fat grafting or fillers have improved results and safety for our patients. Success with facelifting and facial rejuvenation requires an understanding of the underlying anatomy and allows restoration of the anatomy to the younger more youthful status while avoiding complications.
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Draft Genome Sequence of Pantoea ananatis Strain LMG 2665T, a Bacterial Pathogen of Pineapple Fruitlets.
Genome Announc
PUBLISHED: 05-24-2014
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We report the draft genome sequence of Pantoea ananatis LMG 2665(T), the bacterial causal agent of pineapple fruitlet rot.
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Draft genome sequences of three arcobacter strains of pig and dairy cattle manure origin.
Genome Announc
PUBLISHED: 05-17-2014
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The genus Arcobacter has been associated with human illness and fecal contamination by humans and animals. Here, we announce the draft genome sequences of three strains of Arcobacter species cultured from pig and dairy cattle manure tanks. This information will assist in the characterization of features related to host specificities and identify potential pathogenic health risks to humans and animals.
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Draft Genome Sequence of Pectobacterium wasabiae Strain CFIA1002.
Genome Announc
PUBLISHED: 05-17-2014
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Pectobacterium wasabiae, originally causing soft rot disease in horseradish in Japan, was recently found to cause blackleg-like symptoms on potato in the United States, Canada, and Europe. A draft genome sequence of a Canadian potato isolate of P. wasabiae CFIA1002 will enhance the characterization of its pathogenicity and host specificity features.
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Draft genome sequences of two arcobacter strains isolated from human feces.
Genome Announc
PUBLISHED: 04-05-2014
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Arcobacter species are members of the family Campylobacteraceae and are considered emerging enteropathogens and potential zoonotic agents. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of two Arcobacter strains isolated from human feces in an effort to provide further genetic resources for understanding the pathogenic dynamics and diversity of this important genus.
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The role of advocacy coalitions in a project implementation process: the example of the planning phase of the At Home/Chez Soi project dealing with homelessness in Montreal.
Eval Program Plann
PUBLISHED: 03-13-2014
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This study analyzed the planning process (summer 2008 to fall 2009) of a Montreal project that offers housing and community follow-up to homeless people with mental disorders, with or without substance abuse disorders. With the help of the Advocacy Coalition Framework (ACF), advocacy groups that were able to navigate a complex intervention implementation process were identified. In all, 25 people involved in the Montreal At Home/Chez Soi project were surveyed through interviews (n=18) and a discussion group (n=7). Participant observations and documentation (minutes and correspondence) were also used for the analysis. The start-up phase of the At Home/Chez may be broken down into three separate periods qualified respectively as "honeymoon;" "clash of cultures;" and "acceptance & commitment". In each of the planning phases of the At Home/Chez Soi project in Montreal, at least two advocacy coalitions were in confrontation about their specific belief systems concerning solutions to address the recurring homelessness social problem, while a third, more moderate one contributed in rallying most key actors under specified secondary aspects. The study confirms the importance of policy brokers in achieving compromises acceptable to all advocacy coalitions.
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Draft Genome Sequence of Arcobacter cibarius Strain LMG21996T, Isolated from Broiler Carcasses.
Genome Announc
PUBLISHED: 02-22-2014
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The draft genome sequence of Arcobacter cibarius strain LMG21996(T), isolated from chicken carcasses, is reported here. The draft genome consists of 2.2 Mbp, with a 27.12% G+C content. A total of 2,179 protein-coding genes, 46 tRNA genes, and 15 rRNAs have been identified and annotated.
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Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas sp. Strain 2-92, a Biological Control Strain Isolated from a Field Plot Under Long-Term Mineral Fertilization.
Genome Announc
PUBLISHED: 01-11-2014
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Pseudomonas sp. strain 2-92, isolated from a Canadian field plot under long-term mineral fertilization, strongly inhibits the growth of Fusarium graminearum, Rhizoctonia solani, and Gaeumannomyces graminis. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas sp. strain 2-92.
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Codon-based phylogenetics introduces novel flagellar gene markers to oomycete systematics.
Mol. Phylogenet. Evol.
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2014
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Oomycete systematics has traditionally been reliant on ribosomal RNA and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase sequences. Here we report the use of two single-copy protein-coding flagellar genes, PF16 and OCM1, in oomycete systematics, showing their utility in phylogenetic reconstruction and species identification. Applying a recently proposed mutation-selection model of codon substitution, the phylogenetic relationships inferred by flagellar genes are largely in agreement with the current views of oomycete evolution, whereas nucleotide- and amino acid-level models produce biologically implausible reconstructions. Interesting parallels exist between the phylogeny inferred from the flagellar genes and zoospore ontology, providing external support for the tree obtained using the codon model. The resolution achieved for species identification is ample using PF16, and quite robust using OCM1, and the described PCR primers are able to amplify both genes for a range of oomycete genera. Altogether, when analyzed with a rich codon substitution model, these flagellar genes provide useful markers for the oomycete molecular toolbox.
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Outpatient lipoabdominoplasty: review of the literature and practical considerations for safe practice.
Aesthet Surg J
PUBLISHED: 10-02-2013
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Lipoabdominoplasty, popularized by Saldanha et al in 2001, is a powerful technique to contour the abdomen and flanks. It has not gained widespread use as concerns exist about increased complications related to wound healing and thromboembolism.
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Membrane-based oligonucleotide array developed from multiple markers for the detection of many phytophthora species.
Phytopathology
PUBLISHED: 10-01-2013
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Most Phytophthora spp. are destructive plant pathogens; therefore, effective monitoring and accurate early detection are important means of preventing potential epidemics and outbreaks of diseases. In the current study, a membrane-based oligonucleotide array was developed that can detect Phytophthora spp. reliably using three DNA regions; namely, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS), the 5 end of cytochrome c oxidase 1 gene (cox1), and the intergenic region between cytochrome c oxidase 2 gene (cox2) and cox1 (cox2-1 spacer). Each sequence data set contained ?250 sequences representing 98 described and 15 undescribed species of Phytophthora. The array was validated with 143 pure cultures and 35 field samples. Together, nonrejected oligonucleotides from all three markers have the ability to reliably detect 82 described and 8 undescribed Phytophthora spp., including several quarantine or regulated pathogens such as Phytophthora ramorum. Our results showed that a DNA array containing signature oligonucleotides designed from multiple genomic regions provided robustness and redundancy for the detection and differentiation of closely related taxon groups. This array has the potential to be used as a routine diagnostic tool for Phytophthora spp. from complex environmental samples without the need for extensive growth of cultures.
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Comparative genomics reveals insight into virulence strategies of plant pathogenic oomycetes.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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The kingdom Stramenopile includes diatoms, brown algae, and oomycetes. Plant pathogenic oomycetes, including Phytophthora, Pythium and downy mildew species, cause devastating diseases on a wide range of host species and have a significant impact on agriculture. Here, we report comparative analyses on the genomes of thirteen straminipilous species, including eleven plant pathogenic oomycetes, to explore common features linked to their pathogenic lifestyle. We report the sequencing, assembly, and annotation of six Pythium genomes and comparison with other stramenopiles including photosynthetic diatoms, and other plant pathogenic oomycetes such as Phytophthora species, Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis, and Pythium ultimum var. ultimum. Novel features of the oomycete genomes include an expansion of genes encoding secreted effectors and plant cell wall degrading enzymes in Phytophthora species and an over-representation of genes involved in proteolytic degradation and signal transduction in Pythium species. A complete lack of classical RxLR effectors was observed in the seven surveyed Pythium genomes along with an overall reduction of pathogenesis-related gene families in H. arabidopsidis. Comparative analyses revealed fewer genes encoding enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism in Pythium species and H. arabidopsidis as compared to Phytophthora species, suggesting variation in virulence mechanisms within plant pathogenic oomycete species. Shared features between the oomycetes and diatoms revealed common mechanisms of intracellular signaling and transportation. Our analyses demonstrate the value of comparative genome analyses for exploring the evolution of pathogenesis and survival mechanisms in the oomycetes. The comparative analyses of seven Pythium species with the closely related oomycetes, Phytophthora species and H. arabidopsidis, and distantly related diatoms provide insight into genes that underlie virulence.
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Carbohydrate-active enzymes in pythium and their role in plant cell wall and storage polysaccharide degradation.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) are involved in the metabolism of glycoconjugates, oligosaccharides, and polysaccharides and, in the case of plant pathogens, in the degradation of the host cell wall and storage compounds. We performed an in silico analysis of CAZymes predicted from the genomes of seven Pythium species (Py. aphanidermatum, Py. arrhenomanes, Py. irregulare, Py. iwayamai, Py. ultimum var. ultimum, Py. ultimum var. sporangiiferum and Py. vexans) using the "CAZymes Analysis Toolkit" and "Database for Automated Carbohydrate-active Enzyme Annotation" and compared them to previously published oomycete genomes. Growth of Pythium spp. was assessed in a minimal medium containing selected carbon sources that are usually present in plants. The in silico analyses, coupled with our in vitro growth assays, suggest that most of the predicted CAZymes are involved in the metabolism of the oomycete cell wall with starch and sucrose serving as the main carbohydrate sources for growth of these plant pathogens. The genomes of Pythium spp. also encode pectinases and cellulases that facilitate degradation of the plant cell wall and are important in hyphal penetration; however, the species examined in this study lack the requisite genes for the complete saccharification of these carbohydrates for use as a carbon source. Genes encoding for xylan, xyloglucan, (galacto)(gluco)mannan and cutin degradation were absent or infrequent in Pythium spp.. Comparative analyses of predicted CAZymes in oomycetes indicated distinct evolutionary histories. Furthermore, CAZyme gene families among Pythium spp. were not uniformly distributed in the genomes, suggesting independent gene loss events, reflective of the polyphyletic relationships among some of the species.
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Molecular techniques for pathogen identification and fungus detection in the environment.
IMA Fungus
PUBLISHED: 10-17-2011
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Many species of fungi can cause disease in plants, animals and humans. Accurate and robust detection and quantification of fungi is essential for diagnosis, modeling and surveillance. Also direct detection of fungi enables a deeper understanding of natural microbial communities, particularly as a great many fungi are difficult or impossible to cultivate. In the last decade, effective amplification platforms, probe development and various quantitative PCR technologies have revolutionized research on fungal detection and identification. Examples of the latest technology in fungal detection and differentiation are discussed here.
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DNA barcoding of oomycetes with cytochrome c oxidase subunit I and internal transcribed spacer.
Mol Ecol Resour
PUBLISHED: 06-20-2011
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Oomycete species occupy many different environments and many ecological niches. The genera Phytophthora and Pythium for example, contain many plant pathogens which cause enormous damage to a wide range of plant species. Proper identification to the species level is a critical first step in any investigation of oomycetes, whether it is research driven or compelled by the need for rapid and accurate diagnostics during a pathogen outbreak. The use of DNA for oomycete species identification is well established, but DNA barcoding with cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) is a relatively new approach that has yet to be assessed over a significant sample of oomycete genera. In this study we have sequenced COI, from 1205 isolates representing 23 genera. A comparison to internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences from the same isolates showed that COI identification is a practical option; complementary because it uses the mitochondrial genome instead of nuclear DNA. In some cases COI was more discriminative than ITS at the species level. This is in contrast to the large ribosomal subunit, which showed poor species resolution when sequenced from a subset of the isolates used in this study. The results described in this paper indicate that COI sequencing and the dataset generated are a valuable addition to the currently available oomycete taxonomy resources, and that both COI, the default DNA barcode supported by GenBank, and ITS, the de facto barcode accepted by the oomycete and mycology community, are acceptable and complementary DNA barcodes to be used for identification of oomycetes.
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The amsterdam declaration on fungal nomenclature.
IMA Fungus
PUBLISHED: 05-17-2011
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The Amsterdam Declaration on Fungal Nomenclature was agreed at an international symposium convened in Amsterdam on 19-20 April 2011 under the auspices of the International Commission on the Taxonomy of Fungi (ICTF). The purpose of the symposium was to address the issue of whether or how the current system of naming pleomorphic fungi should be maintained or changed now that molecular data are routinely available. The issue is urgent as mycologists currently follow different practices, and no consensus was achieved by a Special Committee appointed in 2005 by the International Botanical Congress to advise on the problem. The Declaration recognizes the need for an orderly transitition to a single-name nomenclatural system for all fungi, and to provide mechanisms to protect names that otherwise then become endangered. That is, meaning that priority should be given to the first described name, except where that is a younger name in general use when the first author to select a name of a pleomorphic monophyletic genus is to be followed, and suggests controversial cases are referred to a body, such as the ICTF, which will report to the Committee for Fungi. If appropriate, the ICTF could be mandated to promote the implementation of the Declaration. In addition, but not forming part of the Declaration, are reports of discussions held during the symposium on the governance of the nomenclature of fungi, and the naming of fungi known only from an environmental nucleic acid sequence in particular. Possible amendments to the Draft BioCode (2011) to allow for the needs of mycologists are suggested for further consideration, and a possible example of how a fungus only known from the environment might be described is presented.
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The Comprehensive Phytopathogen Genomics Resource: a web-based resource for data-mining plant pathogen genomes.
Database (Oxford)
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2011
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The Comprehensive Phytopathogen Genomics Resource (CPGR) provides a web-based portal for plant pathologists and diagnosticians to view the genome and trancriptome sequence status of 806 bacterial, fungal, oomycete, nematode, viral and viroid plant pathogens. Tools are available to search and analyze annotated genome sequences of 74 bacterial, fungal and oomycete pathogens. Oomycete and fungal genomes are obtained directly from GenBank, whereas bacterial genome sequences are downloaded from the A Systematic Annotation Package (ASAP) database that provides curation of genomes using comparative approaches. Curated lists of bacterial genes relevant to pathogenicity and avirulence are also provided. The Plant Pathogen Transcript Assemblies Database provides annotated assemblies of the transcribed regions of 82 eukaryotic genomes from publicly available single pass Expressed Sequence Tags. Data-mining tools are provided along with tools to create candidate diagnostic markers, an emerging use for genomic sequence data in plant pathology. The Plant Pathogen Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) database is a resource for pathogens that lack genome or transcriptome data sets and contains 131?755 rDNA sequences from GenBank for 17?613 species identified as plant pathogens and related genera. Database URL: http://cpgr.plantbiology.msu.edu.
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Beard reconstruction using hair grafts in a free flap.
Can J Plast Surg
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2011
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Hair transplantation using micrografts or minigrafts is a standard procedure used for hair restoration in androgenic, burn scar and cicatricial alopecia. These grafts have also been used to reconstruct the eyebrow, eyelash, mustache, beard and pubic escutcheon. A patient who underwent successful micrograft and minigraft hair transplantation into a free osteocutaneous mandibular flap reconstruction is presented. The patient was very satisfied with his reconstruction, and the hair transplants provided excellent camouflage for the flap.
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Assessing macroinvertebrate biodiversity in freshwater ecosystems: advances and challenges in DNA-based approaches.
Q Rev Biol
PUBLISHED: 10-06-2010
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Assessing the biodiversity of macroinvertebrate fauna in freshwater ecosystems is an essential component of both basic ecological inquiry and applied ecological assessments. Aspects of taxonomic diversity and composition in freshwater communities are widely used to quantify water quality and measure the efficacy of remediation and restoration efforts. The accuracy and precision of biodiversity assessments based on standard morphological identifications are often limited by taxonomic resolution and sample size. Morphologically based identifications are laborious and costly, significantly constraining the sample sizes that can be processed. We suggest that the development of an assay platform based on DNA signatures will increase the precision and ease of quantifying biodiversity in freshwater ecosystems. Advances in this area will be particularly relevant for benthic and planktonic invertebrates, which are often monitored by regulatory agencies. Adopting a genetic assessment platform will alleviate some of the current limitations to biodiversity assessment strategies. We discuss the benefits and challenges associated with DNA-based assessments and the methods that are currently available. As recent advances in microarray and next-generation sequencing technologies will facilitate a transition to DNA-based assessment approaches, future research efforts should focus on methods for data collection, assay platform development, establishing linkages between DNA signatures and well-resolved taxonomies, and bioinformatics.
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The promise and pitfalls of sequence-based identification of plant-pathogenic fungi and oomycetes.
Phytopathology
PUBLISHED: 07-15-2010
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Sequences of selected marker loci have been widely used for the identification of specific pathogens and the development of sequence-based diagnostic methods. Although such approaches offer several advantages over traditional culture-based methods for pathogen diagnosis and identification, they have their own pitfalls. These include erroneous and incomplete data in reference databases, poor or oversimplified interpretation of search results, and problems associated with defining species boundaries. In this letter, we outline the potential benefits and drawbacks of using sequence data for identification and taxonomic deduction of plant-pathogenic fungi and oomycetes, using phytophthora as a primary example. We also discuss potential remedies for these pitfalls and address why coordinated community efforts are essential to make such remedies more efficient and robust.
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Development of a specific TaqMan real-time PCR assay for quantification of Fusarium graminearum clade 7 and comparison of fungal biomass determined by PCR with deoxynivalenol content in wheat and barley.
Int. J. Food Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 03-12-2010
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A Fusarium graminearum clade 7 specific real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay was developed in this study based on unique polymorphisms in sequences of the mating type protein (MAT) gene. PCR amplification was not observed in eight phylogenetic lineages of the F. graminearum complex and four other closely related Fusarium species. Accuracy of the quantification of the real-time PCR assay was verified with wheat DNA spiked with F. graminearum clade 7 DNA. Wheat samples representing two Canadian wheat classes, CWRS (Canadian Western Red Spring) and CWRW (Canadian Western Red Winter) were used to determine the relationships among F. graminearum DNA, deoxynivalenol (DON) and Fusarium damaged kernel (FDK). The amount of DON and F. graminearum DNA remaining after removal of FDK varied among samples, but was sometimes substantial. Positive correlations were observed between F. graminearum clade 7 DNA (in picograms) and DON as well as FDK. There was also a strong correlation between FDK and DON in CWRS and CWRW wheat composite samples, but the inherent variability in individual producer samples precluded a definitive correlation. For barley, a positive correlation was observed between Fusarium DNA and DON values. Real-time PCR assays can be a valuable tool for barley as there are no reliable symptoms to visually assess the level of Fusarium head blight in this crop.
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Two new species of Pythium, P. senticosum and P. takayamanum,isolated from cool-temperate forest soil in Japan.
Mycologia
PUBLISHED: 07-24-2009
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Pythium senticosum and P. takayamanum spp. nov. were isolated from cool-temperate forest soil in Japan. P. senticosum can grow at 5 C and is fast growing at 25 C with a radial growth of 22.2 mm 24 h(-1). The species is morphologically characterized by ovoid to ellipsoid sporangia with apical papilla, ornamented oogonia with acute conical spines, and antheridia with broad attachment to oogonia. P. takayamanum is very different and can grow at 35 C. This species is morphologically characterized by its wavy antheridial stalks and ellipsoidal oogonia with constricted areas. Phylogenetic analyses of the ITS rDNA region and the partial COX2 gene showed that the two species are genetically distinct from each other and from their closest relatives. P. senticosum is closely related to P. dimorphum and P. undulatum whereas P. takayamanum is closely related to P. rhizosaccharum and P. parvum.
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Influence of Pythium oligandrum biocontrol on fungal and oomycete population dynamics in the rhizosphere.
Appl. Environ. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 05-15-2009
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Fungal and oomycete populations and their dynamics were investigated following the introduction of the biocontrol agent Pythium oligandrum into the rhizosphere of tomato plants grown in soilless culture. Three strains of P. oligandrum were selected on the basis of their ability to form oospores (resting structures) and to produce tryptamine (an auxin-like compound) and oligandrin (a glycoprotein elicitor). Real-time PCR and plate counting demonstrated the persistence of large amounts of the antagonistic oomycete in the rhizosphere throughout the cropping season (April to September). Inter-simple-sequence-repeat analysis of the P. oligandrum strains collected from root samples at the end of the cropping season showed that among the three strains used for inoculation, the one producing the smallest amount of oospores was detected at 90%. Single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis revealed increases in the number of members and the complexity of the fungal community over time. There were no significant differences between the microbial ecosystems inoculated with P. oligandrum and those that were not treated, except for a reduction of Pythium dissotocum (ubiquitous tomato root minor pathogen) populations in inoculated systems during the last 3 months of culture. These findings raise interesting issues concerning the use of P. oligandrum strains producing elicitor and auxin molecules for plant protection and the development of biocontrol.
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Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region as a universal DNA barcode marker for Fungi.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
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Six DNA regions were evaluated as potential DNA barcodes for Fungi, the second largest kingdom of eukaryotic life, by a multinational, multilaboratory consortium. The region of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 used as the animal barcode was excluded as a potential marker, because it is difficult to amplify in fungi, often includes large introns, and can be insufficiently variable. Three subunits from the nuclear ribosomal RNA cistron were compared together with regions of three representative protein-coding genes (largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, and minichromosome maintenance protein). Although the protein-coding gene regions often had a higher percent of correct identification compared with ribosomal markers, low PCR amplification and sequencing success eliminated them as candidates for a universal fungal barcode. Among the regions of the ribosomal cistron, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region has the highest probability of successful identification for the broadest range of fungi, with the most clearly defined barcode gap between inter- and intraspecific variation. The nuclear ribosomal large subunit, a popular phylogenetic marker in certain groups, had superior species resolution in some taxonomic groups, such as the early diverging lineages and the ascomycete yeasts, but was otherwise slightly inferior to the ITS. The nuclear ribosomal small subunit has poor species-level resolution in fungi. ITS will be formally proposed for adoption as the primary fungal barcode marker to the Consortium for the Barcode of Life, with the possibility that supplementary barcodes may be developed for particular narrowly circumscribed taxonomic groups.
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Phylogeny of the genus Synchytrium and the development of a real-time TaqMan PCR assay for sensitive detection of Synchytrium endobioticum sporangia in the chloroform flotation fraction of sieved field soil.
Phytopathology
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Potato wart, caused by the fungal pathogen Synchytrium endobioticum (Schilbersky) Percival, is a serious, disease with the potential to cause significant economic damage. The small subunit (SSU) and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) ribosomal DNA were sequenced for several Synchytrium species, showing a high rate of variability for both of these markers among the different species and monophyly of the genus within phylum Chytridiomycota. The intergenic non transcribed spacer (IGS) of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) was sequenced for different pathotypes and showed no intraspecific variation within S. endobioticum, similar to the other rDNA markers from this study. To facilitate screening for the pathogen in soil, three TaqMan polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were developed from SSU, ITS and IGS rDNA sequences to detect S. endobioticum sporangia in the chloroform-flotation fraction of sieved soil extracts. In the screening portion of the method, a first TaqMan assay targeting the SSU rDNA was developed with positive results that were further confirmed with amplicon melt analysis. A synthetic reaction control cloned into a plasmid was incorporated into the procedure, facilitating the validation of negative results. The presence of the reaction control did not adversely affect the efficiency of the SSU-target amplification. A second TaqMan assay targeting the ITS-1 region was developed as a confirmatory test. There was 100% accordance between the SSU and ITS-1 TaqMan assays. Utilizing these two assays in tandem achieved good specificity for S. endobioticum, generating negative results with the cloned SSU and ITS-1 regions from all 14 other Synchytrium species considered. Spike recovery experiments indicated that these assays, targeting the SSU and ITS-1 rDNA regions, developed from a phylogeny dataset of the genus, could reliably detect a single sporangium in the chloroform flotation fraction of a soil extract. Good correlation between microscopic detection of sporangia and PCR results, in both positive and negative soil samples, was dually demonstrated for both the SSU and ITS-1 assays.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.