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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
DEPDC1/LET-99 participates in an evolutionarily conserved pathway for anti-tubulin drug-induced apoptosis.
Nat. Cell Biol.
PUBLISHED: 03-03-2014
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Microtubule-targeting chemotherapeutics induce apoptosis in cancer cells by promoting the phosphorylation and degradation of the anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family member MCL1. The signalling cascade linking microtubule disruption to MCL1 degradation remains however to be defined. Here, we establish an in vivo screening strategy in Caenorhabditis elegans to uncover genes involved in chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. Using an RNAi-based screen, we identify three genes required for vincristine-induced apoptosis. We show that the DEP domain protein LET-99 acts upstream of the heterotrimeric G protein alpha subunit GPA-11 to control activation of the stress kinase JNK-1. The human homologue of LET-99, DEPDC1, similarly regulates vincristine-induced cell death by promoting JNK-dependent degradation of the BCL-2 family protein MCL1. Collectively, these data uncover an evolutionarily conserved mediator of anti-tubulin drug-induced apoptosis and suggest that DEPDC1 levels could be an additional determinant for therapy response upstream of MCL1.
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Culturing muscle fibres in hanging drop: a novel approach to solve an old problem.
Biol. Cell
PUBLISHED: 01-10-2014
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The satellite cells (SCs) associated with muscle fibres play a key role in postnatal growth and regeneration of skeletal muscle. Commonly used methods of isolation and in vitro culture of SCs lead to the mixture of their subpopulations that exist within muscle. To solve this problem, we used the well established technique, the hanging drop system, to culture SCs in a three-dimensional environment and thus, to monitor them in their original niche.
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Loss of CB1 receptors leads to decreased cathepsin D levels and accelerated lipofuscin accumulation in the hippocampus.
Mech. Ageing Dev.
PUBLISHED: 05-08-2013
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Early onset of age-related changes in the brain of cannabinoid 1 receptor knockout (Cnr1(-/-)) mice suggests that cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor activity significantly influences the progression of brain aging. In the present study we show that lack of CB1 receptors leads to a significant increase in lipofuscin accumulation and a reduced expression and activity of cathepsin D, lysosomal protease implicated in the degradation of damaged macromolecules, in the hippocampus of 12-month-old mice. The impaired clearance of damaged macromolecules due to the low cathepsin D levels and not enhanced oxidative stress may be responsible for the lipofuscin accumulation because macromolecule oxidation levels were comparable between the genotypes within the same age group. The altered levels of autophagy markers p62 and LC3-II suggest that autophagy is upregulated in CB1 knockout mice. Increased autophagic flux in the absence of CB1 receptors is probably a compensatory mechanism to partially counteract decreased lysosomal degradation capacity. Together, these results suggest that CB1 receptor activity affects lysosomal activity, degradation of damaged macromolecules and thus it may influence the course and onset of brain aging.
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Cardiopulmonary response and body composition changes after prolonged high altitude exposure in women.
High Alt. Med. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 12-31-2011
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Weight loss in men is commonly observed during prolonged high altitude exposure as a result of a daily negative energy balance. Its amount depends mainly on duration of exposure, altitude reached, and level of physical activity. This reduction in body weight often comes with a loss of muscular mass, likely contributing to the decreased physical performance generally reported. Limited data is, however, available on body composition, functional capacity, and cardiopulmonary response to exercise after high altitude exposure in women. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of prolonged high altitude exposure on body composition and on cardiopulmonary response to maximal exercise in a group of young, moderately active women. Twelve female subjects, aged 21.5 ± 3.1 (mean ± SD), BMI 22.1 ± 1.9 kg · m(-2) and Vo(2max) 33.8 ± 3.5 mL · kg(-1) · min(-1), participated in this study, by residing for 21 days at high altitude (5050 m, Pyramid, EV-K(2)-CNR laboratory). Before and after high altitude exposure, all subjects underwent both a body composition evaluation using two methods (bioimpedance analysis and DEXA) and a functional evaluation based on a maximal exercise test on a cycle ergometer with breath-by-breath gas analysis. After high altitude exposure, data showed a slight, nonsignificant reduction in body weight, with an average 3:2 reduction ratio between fat and fat-free mass evaluated by DEXA, in addition to a significant decrease in Vo(2max) on the cycle ergometer test (p<0.01). Changes in Vo(2max) correlated to changes of leg muscle mass, evaluated by DEXA (r(2) = 0.72; p<0.0001). No changes were observed in the maximal heart rate, work capacity, and ventilatory thresholds, while the Vo(2)/W slope was significantly reduced (p<0.05). Finally, Ve/Vo(2) and VE/Vco(2max) slopes were increased (p<0.01), suggesting a possible long-term modulation of the exercise ventilatory response after prolonged high altitude exposure.
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In vivo tissue engineering of functional skeletal muscle by freshly isolated satellite cells embedded in a photopolymerizable hydrogel.
FASEB J.
PUBLISHED: 03-30-2011
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The success of skeletal muscle reconstruction depends on finding the most effective, clinically suitable strategy to engineer myogenic cells and biocompatible scaffolds. Satellite cells (SCs), freshly isolated or transplanted within their niche, are presently considered the best source for muscle regeneration. Here, we designed and developed the delivery of either SCs or muscle progenitor cells (MPCs) via an in situ photo-cross-linkable hyaluronan-based hydrogel, hyaluronic acid-photoinitiator (HA-PI) complex. Partially ablated tibialis anterior (TA) of C57BL/6J mice engrafted with freshly isolated satellite cells embedded in hydrogel showed a major improvement in muscle structure and number of new myofibers, compared to muscles receiving hydrogel + MPCs or hydrogel alone. Notably, SCs embedded in HA-PI also promoted functional recovery, as assessed by contractile force measurements. Tissue reconstruction was associated with the formation of both neural and vascular networks and the reconstitution of a functional SC niche. This innovative approach could overcome previous limitations in skeletal muscle tissue engineering.
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Advances in musculoskeletal tissue engineering: moving towards therapy.
Organogenesis
PUBLISHED: 03-10-2010
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Skeletal muscle can self-repair, but is unable to restore significant tissue loss, as consequence of trauma, congenital defects, tumor ablation or denervation. Intramuscular injection of autologous or allogenic derived myogenic cells (namely satellite cells and myoblasts) did not lead to efficient regeneration because of poor cell retention and survival, as well as immunorejection. In the last decade, tissue engineering looked at overcoming these problems by investigating alternative treatment options, i.e., the suspension of myogenic precursors in temporary matrix, formed by biodegradable and biocompatible materials. This approach allows to engineer custom architectured preconditioned implants, and locally deliver paracrine factors.This article reviews current and potential strategies for the repair of damaged muscle and suggests some innovative approaches for the translation to the clinical setting.
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Cobalt induces oxidative stress in isolated liver mitochondria responsible for permeability transition and intrinsic apoptosis in hepatocyte primary cultures.
Int. J. Biochem. Cell Biol.
PUBLISHED: 12-16-2009
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It is well established that cobalt mediates the occurrence of oxidative stress which contributes to cell toxicity and death. However, the mechanisms of these effects are not fully understood. This investigation aimed at establishing if cobalt acts as an inducer of mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis and at clarifying the mechanism of this process. Cobalt, in the ionized species Co(2+), is able to induce the phenomenon of mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) in rat liver mitochondria (RLM) with the opening of the transition pore. In fact, Co(2+) induces mitochondrial swelling, which is prevented by cyclosporin A and other typical MPT inhibitors such as Ca(2+) transport inhibitors and bongkrekic acid, as well as anti-oxidant agents. In parallel with mitochondrial swelling, Co(2+) also induces the collapse of electrical membrane potential. However in this case, cyclosporine A and the other MPT inhibitors (except ruthenium red and EGTA) only partially prevent DeltaPsi drop, suggesting that Co(2+) also has a proton leakage effect on the inner mitochondrial membrane. MPT induction is due to oxidative stress, as a result of generation by Co(2+) of the highly damaging hydroxyl radical, with the oxidation of sulfhydryl groups, glutathione and pyridine nucleotides. Co(2+) also induces the release of the pro-apoptotic factors, cytochrome c and AIF. Incubation of rat hepatocyte primary cultures with Co(2+) results in apoptosis induction with caspase activation and increased level of expression of HIF-1alpha. All these observations allow us to state that, in the presence of calcium, Co(2+) is an inducer of apoptosis triggered by mitochondrial oxidative stress.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.