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In situ detection of autoreactive CD4 T cells in brain and heart using major histocompatibility complex class II dextramers.
J Vis Exp
PUBLISHED: 08-01-2014
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This report demonstrates the use of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II dextramers for detection of autoreactive CD4 T cells in situ in myelin proteolipid protein (PLP) 139-151-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in SJL mice and cardiac myosin heavy chain-? (Myhc) 334-352-induced experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) in A/J mice. Two sets of cocktails of dextramer reagents were used, where dextramers(+) cells were analyzed by laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM): EAE, IA(s)/PLP 139-151 dextramers (specific)/anti-CD4 and IA(s)/Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) 70-86 dextramers (control)/anti-CD4; and EAM, IA(k)/Myhc 334-352 dextramers/anti-CD4 and IA(k)/bovine ribonuclease (RNase) 43-56 dextramers (control)/anti-CD4. LSCM analysis of brain sections obtained from EAE mice showed the presence of cells positive for CD4 and PLP 139-151 dextramers, but not TMEV 70-86 dextramers suggesting that the staining obtained with PLP 139-151 dextramers was specific. Likewise, heart sections prepared from EAM mice also revealed the presence of Myhc 334-352, but not RNase 43-56-dextramer(+) cells as expected. Further, a comprehensive method has also been devised to quantitatively analyze the frequencies of antigen-specific CD4 T cells in the 'Z' serial images.
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The Origin and Biosynthesis of the Benzenoid Moiety of Ubiquinone (Coenzyme Q) in Arabidopsis.
Plant Cell
PUBLISHED: 05-16-2014
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It is not known how plants make the benzenoid ring of ubiquinone, a vital respiratory cofactor. Here, we demonstrate that Arabidopsis thaliana uses for that purpose two separate biosynthetic branches stemming from phenylalanine and tyrosine. Gene network modeling and characterization of T-DNA mutants indicated that acyl-activating enzyme encoded by At4g19010 contributes to the biosynthesis of ubiquinone specifically from phenylalanine. CoA ligase assays verified that At4g19010 prefers para-coumarate, ferulate, and caffeate as substrates. Feeding experiments demonstrated that the at4g19010 knockout cannot use para-coumarate for ubiquinone biosynthesis and that the supply of 4-hydroxybenzoate, the side-chain shortened version of para-coumarate, can bypass this blockage. Furthermore, a trans-cinnamate 4-hydroxylase mutant, which is impaired in the conversion of trans-cinnamate into para-coumarate, displayed similar defects in ubiquinone biosynthesis to that of the at4g19010 knockout. Green fluorescent protein fusion experiments demonstrated that At4g19010 occurs in peroxisomes, resulting in an elaborate biosynthetic architecture where phenylpropanoid intermediates have to be transported from the cytosol to peroxisomes and then to mitochondria where ubiquinone is assembled. Collectively, these results demonstrate that At4g19010 activates the propyl side chain of para-coumarate for its subsequent ?-oxidative shortening. Evidence is shown that the peroxisomal ABCD transporter (PXA1) plays a critical role in this branch.
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Direct staining with major histocompatibility complex class II dextramers permits detection of antigen-specific, autoreactive CD4 T cells in situ.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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We report here the utility of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II dextramers for in situ detection of self-reactive CD4 T cells in two target organs, the brain and heart. We optimized the conditions for in situ detection of antigen-specific CD4 T cells using brain sections obtained from SJL mice immunized with myelin proteolipid protein (PLP) 139-151; the sections were costained with IA(s)/PLP 139-151 (specific) or Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) 70-86 (control) dextramers and anti-CD4. Analysis of sections by laser scanning confocal microscope revealed detection of cells positive for PLP 139-151 but not for TMEV 70-86 dextramers to be colocalized with CD4-expressing T cells, indicating that the staining was specific to PLP 139-151 dextramers. Further, we devised a method to reliably enumerate the frequencies of antigen-specific T cells by counting the number of dextramer? CD4? T cells in the 'Z' serial images acquired sequentially. We next extended these observations to detect cardiac myosin-specific T cells in autoimmune myocarditis induced in A/J mice by immunizing with cardiac myosin heavy chain-? (Myhc) 334-352. Heart sections prepared from immunized mice were costained with Myhc 334-352 (specific) or bovine ribonuclease 43-56 (control) dextramers together with anti-CD4; the sections showed the infiltrations of Myhc-specific CD4 T cells. The data suggest that MHC class II dextramers are useful tools for enumerating the frequencies of antigen-specific CD4 T cells in situ by direct staining without having to amplify the fluorescent signals, an approach commonly employed with conventional MHC tetramers.
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The Pseudomonas syringae type III effector HopD1 suppresses effector-triggered immunity, localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum, and targets the Arabidopsis transcription factor NTL9.
New Phytol.
PUBLISHED: 08-24-2013
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Pseudomonas syringae type III effectors are known to suppress plant immunity to promote bacterial virulence. However, the activities and targets of these effectors are not well understood. We used genetic, molecular, and cell biology methods to characterize the activities, localization, and target of the HopD1 type III effector in Arabidopsis. HopD1 contributes to P. syringae virulence in Arabidopsis and reduces effector-triggered immunity (ETI) responses but not pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) responses. Plants expressing HopD1 supported increased growth of ETI-inducing P. syringae strains compared with wild-type Arabidopsis. We show that HopD1 interacts with the membrane-tethered Arabidopsis transcription factor NTL9 and demonstrate that this interaction occurs at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). A P. syringae hopD1 mutant and ETI-inducing P. syringae strains exhibited enhanced growth on Arabidopsis ntl9 mutant plants. Conversely, growth of P. syringae strains was reduced in plants expressing a constitutively active NTL9 derivative, indicating that NTL9 is a positive regulator of plant immunity. Furthermore, HopD1 inhibited the induction of NTL9-regulated genes during ETI but not PTI. HopD1 contributes to P. syringae virulence in part by targeting NTL9, resulting in the suppression of ETI responses but not PTI responses and the promotion of plant pathogenicity.
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Functional modeling identifies paralogous solanesyl-diphosphate synthases that assemble the side chain of plastoquinone-9 in plastids.
J. Biol. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 08-02-2013
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It is a little known fact that plastoquinone-9, a vital redox cofactor of photosynthesis, doubles as a precursor for the biosynthesis of a vitamin E analog called plastochromanol-8, the physiological significance of which has remained elusive. Gene network reconstruction, GFP fusion experiments, and targeted metabolite profiling of insertion mutants indicated that Arabidopsis possesses two paralogous solanesyl-diphosphate synthases, AtSPS1 (At1g78510) and AtSPS2 (At1g17050), that assemble the side chain of plastoquinone-9 in plastids. Similar paralogous pairs were detected throughout terrestrial plant lineages but were not distinguished in the literature and genomic databases from mitochondrial homologs involved in the biosynthesis of ubiquinone. The leaves of the atsps2 knock-out were devoid of plastochromanol-8 and displayed severe losses of both non-photoactive and photoactive plastoquinone-9, resulting in near complete photoinhibition at high light intensity. Such a photoinhibition was paralleled by significant damage to photosystem II but not to photosystem I. In contrast, in the atsps1 knock-out, a small loss of plastoquinone-9, restricted to the non-photoactive pool, was sufficient to eliminate half of the plastochromanol-8 content of the leaves. Taken together, these results demonstrate that plastochromanol-8 originates from a subfraction of the non-photoactive pool of plastoquinone-9. In contrast to other plastochromanol-8 biosynthetic mutants, neither the single atsps knock-outs nor the atsps1 atsps2 double knock-out displayed any defects in tocopherols accumulation or germination.
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Distinct Pseudomonas type-III effectors use a cleavable transit peptide to target chloroplasts.
Plant J.
PUBLISHED: 04-12-2013
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The pathogen Pseudomonas syringae requires a type-III protein secretion system and the effector proteins it injects into plant cells for pathogenesis. The primary role for P. syringae type-III effectors is the suppression of plant immunity. The P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 HopK1 type-III effector was known to suppress the hypersensitive response (HR), a programmed cell death response associated with effector-triggered immunity. Here we show that DC3000 hopK1 mutants are reduced in their ability to grow in Arabidopsis, and produce reduced disease symptoms. Arabidopsis transgenically expressing HopK1 are reduced in PAMP-triggered immune responses compared with wild-type plants. An N-terminal region of HopK1 shares similarity with the corresponding region in the well-studied type-III effector AvrRps4; however, their C-terminal regions are dissimilar, indicating that they have different effector activities. HopK1 is processed in planta at the same processing site found in AvrRps4. The processed forms of HopK1 and AvrRps4 are chloroplast localized, indicating that the shared N-terminal regions of these type-III effectors represent a chloroplast transit peptide. The HopK1 contribution to virulence and the ability of HopK1 and AvrRps4 to suppress immunity required their respective transit peptides, but the AvrRps4-induced HR did not. Our results suggest that a primary virulence target of these type-III effectors resides in chloroplasts, and that the recognition of AvrRps4 by the plant immune system occurs elsewhere. Moreover, our results reveal that distinct type-III effectors use a cleavable transit peptide to localize to chloroplasts, and that targets within this organelle are important for immunity.
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Gene network reconstruction identifies the authentic trans-prenyl diphosphate synthase that makes the solanesyl moiety of ubiquinone-9 in Arabidopsis.
Plant J.
PUBLISHED: 10-25-2011
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Ubiquinone (coenzyme Q) is the generic name of a class of lipid-soluble electron carriers formed of a redox active benzoquinone ring attached to a prenyl side chain. The length of the latter varies among species, and depends upon the product specificity of a trans-long-chain prenyl diphosphate synthase that elongates an allylic diphosphate precursor. In Arabidopsis, this enzyme is assumed to correspond to an endoplasmic reticulum-located solanesyl diphosphate synthase, although direct genetic evidence was lacking. In this study, the reconstruction of the functional network of Arabidopsis genes linked to ubiquinone biosynthesis singled out an unsuspected solanesyl diphosphate synthase candidate--product of gene At2g34630--that, extraordinarily, had been shown previously to be targeted to plastids and to contribute to the biosynthesis of gibberellins. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion experiments in tobacco and Arabidopsis, and complementation of a yeast coq1 knockout lacking mitochondrial hexaprenyl diphosphate synthase demonstrated that At2g34630 is also targeted to mitochondria. At2g34630 is the main--if not sole--contributor to solanesyl diphosphate synthase activity required for the biosynthesis of ubiquinone, as demonstrated by the dramatic (75-80%) reduction of the ubiquinone pool size in corresponding RNAi lines. Overexpression of At2g34630 gave up to a 40% increase in ubiquinone content compared to wild-type plants. None of the silenced or overexpressing lines, in contrast, displayed altered levels of plastoquinone. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that At2g34630 is the only Arabidopsis trans-long-chain prenyl diphosphate synthase that clusters with the Coq1 orthologs involved in the biosynthesis of ubiquinone in other eukaryotes.
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MutS HOMOLOG1 is a nucleoid protein that alters mitochondrial and plastid properties and plant response to high light.
Plant Cell
PUBLISHED: 09-20-2011
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Mitochondrial-plastid interdependence within the plant cell is presumed to be essential, but measurable demonstration of this intimate interaction is difficult. At the level of cellular metabolism, several biosynthetic pathways involve both mitochondrial- and plastid-localized steps. However, at an environmental response level, it is not clear how the two organelles intersect in programmed cellular responses. Here, we provide evidence, using genetic perturbation of the MutS Homolog1 (MSH1) nuclear gene in five plant species, that MSH1 functions within the mitochondrion and plastid to influence organellar genome behavior and plant growth patterns. The mitochondrial form of the protein participates in DNA recombination surveillance, with disruption of the gene resulting in enhanced mitochondrial genome recombination at numerous repeated sequences. The plastid-localized form of the protein interacts with the plastid genome and influences genome stability and plastid development, with its disruption leading to variegation of the plant. These developmental changes include altered patterns of nuclear gene expression. Consistency of plastid and mitochondrial response across both monocot and dicot species indicate that the dual-functioning nature of MSH1 is well conserved. Variegated tissues show changes in redox status together with enhanced plant survival and reproduction under photooxidative light conditions, evidence that the plastid changes triggered in this study comprise an adaptive response to naturally occurring light stress.
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Bacterial killing by dry metallic copper surfaces.
Appl. Environ. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 12-10-2010
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Metallic copper surfaces rapidly and efficiently kill bacteria. Cells exposed to copper surfaces accumulated large amounts of copper ions, and this copper uptake was faster from dry copper than from moist copper. Cells suffered extensive membrane damage within minutes of exposure to dry copper. Further, cells removed from copper showed loss of cell integrity. Acute contact with metallic copper surfaces did not result in increased mutation rates or DNA lesions. These findings are important first steps for revealing the molecular sensitive targets in cells lethally challenged by exposure to copper surfaces and provide a scientific explanation for the use of copper surfaces as antimicrobial agents for supporting public hygiene.
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Mechanisms of contact-mediated killing of yeast cells on dry metallic copper surfaces.
Appl. Environ. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 11-19-2010
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Surfaces made of copper or its alloys have strong antimicrobial properties against a wide variety of microorganisms. However, the molecular mode of action responsible for the antimicrobial efficacy of metallic copper is not known. Here, we show that dry copper surfaces inactivate Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae within minutes in a process called contact-mediated killing. Cellular copper ion homeostasis systems influenced the kinetics of contact-mediated killing in both organisms. Deregulated copper ion uptake through a hyperactive S. cerevisiae Ctr1p (ScCtr1p) copper uptake transporter in Saccharomyces resulted in faster inactivation of mutant cells than of wild-type cells. Similarly, lack of the C. albicans Crp1p (CaCrp1p) copper-efflux P-type ATPase or the metallothionein CaCup1p caused more-rapid killing of Candida mutant cells than of wild-type cells. Candida and Saccharomyces took up large quantities of copper ions as soon as they were in contact with copper surfaces, as indicated by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) analysis and by the intracellular copper ion-reporting dye coppersensor-1. Exposure to metallic copper did not cause lethality through genotoxicity, deleterious action on a cells genetic material, as indicated by a mutation assay with Saccharomyces. Instead, toxicity mediated by metallic copper surfaces targeted membranes in both yeast species. With the use of Live/Dead staining, onset of rapid and extensive cytoplasmic membrane damage was observed in cells from copper surfaces. Fluorescence microscopy using the indicator dye DiSBaC(2)(3) indicated that cell membranes were depolarized. Also, during contact-mediated killing, vacuoles first became enlarged and then disappeared from the cells. Lastly, in metallic copper-stressed yeasts, oxidative stress in the cytoplasm and in mitochondria was elevated.
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Variation in leaf stomatal traits of 28 tree species in relation to gas exchange along an edaphic gradient in a Bornean rain forest.
Am. J. Bot.
PUBLISHED: 06-03-2010
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• Premise of the study: Quantifying variation in functional traits associated with shifts in the species composition of plant communities along resource gradients helps identify environmental attributes important for community assembly. Stomates regulate the balance between carbon assimilation and water status in plants. If environmental attributes affecting photosynthetic water-use efficiency govern species distribution along an edaphic gradient, then adaptive variation in stomatal traits of plant species specializing on different soils should reflect belowground resource availability. • Methods: We tested this hypothesis by quantifying stomatal trait variation in understory saplings of 28 Bornean tree species in relation to gas exchange and water-use efficiency (WUE). • Key results: Comparisons between congeneric specialists of the more fertile, moister clay and the less fertile, well-drained sandy loam revealed little evidence of similar shifts in stomatal traits across genera, nor was stomatal pore index correlated with g(max), A(max), or WUE (A(max)/g(max) or ?(13)C), suggesting that stomates may be overbuilt in these shaded juveniles. A(max) was higher on sandy loam, likely due to higher understory irradiance there, but there were no other significant differences in gas exchange or WUE. • Conclusions: Despite substantial diversity in stomatal anatomy, there were few strong relationships between stomatal, photosynthetic, and WUE traits in relation to soil resources. Routine differences in water availability therefore may not exert a dominant control on the distributions of these Bornean tree species. Furthermore, the clades represented by these 12 genera may possess alternative functional designs enabling photosynthetic WUE that is sufficient to these humid, understory environments, due to whole plant-functional integration of stomatal traits with other, unmeasured traits influencing gas exchange.
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Shiga toxin is transported into the nucleoli of intestinal epithelial cells via a carrier-dependent process.
Toxins (Basel)
PUBLISHED: 04-22-2010
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Shiga toxin (Stx) produced by the invasive Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 (S. dysenteriae1) causes gastrointestinal and kidney complications. It has been assumed that Stx is released intracellularly after enterocyte invasion by S. dysenteriae1. However, there is little information about Stx distribution inside S. dysenteriae1-infected enterocytes. Here, we use intestinal epithelial T84 cells to characterize the trafficking of Stx delivered into the cytosol, in ways that mimic aspects of S. dysenteriae1 infection. We find that cytoplasmic Stx is transported into nucleoli. Stx nucleolar movement is carrier- and energy-dependent. Stx binding to the nucleoli of normal human enterocytes in vitro supports possible roles for nucleolar trafficking in toxin-induced intestinal pathology.
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The Pseudomonas syringae type III effector HopG1 targets mitochondria, alters plant development and suppresses plant innate immunity.
Cell. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 10-27-2009
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The bacterial plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae uses a type III protein secretion system to inject type III effectors into plant cells. Primary targets of these effectors appear to be effector-triggered immunity (ETI) and pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI). The type III effector HopG1 is a suppressor of ETI that is broadly conserved in bacterial plant pathogens. Here we show that HopG1 from P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 also suppresses PTI. Interestingly, HopG1 localizes to plant mitochondria, suggesting that its suppression of innate immunity may be linked to a perturbation of mitochondrial function. While HopG1 possesses no obvious mitochondrial signal peptide, its N-terminal two-thirds was sufficient for mitochondrial localization. A HopG1-GFP fusion lacking HopG1s N-terminal 13 amino acids was not localized to the mitochondria reflecting the importance of the N-terminus for targeting. Constitutive expression of HopG1 in Arabidopsis thaliana, Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) and Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) dramatically alters plant development resulting in dwarfism, increased branching and infertility. Constitutive expression of HopG1 in planta leads to reduced respiration rates and an increased basal level of reactive oxygen species. These findings suggest that HopG1s target is mitochondrial and that effector/target interaction promotes disease by disrupting mitochondrial functions.
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Spontaneous metastasis of prostate cancer is promoted by excess hyaluronan synthesis and processing.
Am. J. Pathol.
PUBLISHED: 02-13-2009
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Accumulation of extracellular hyaluronan (HA) and its processing enzyme, the hyaluronidase Hyal1, predicts invasive, metastatic progression of human prostate cancer. To dissect the roles of hyaluronan synthases (HAS) and Hyal1 in tumorigenesis and metastasis, we selected nonmetastatic 22Rv1 prostate tumor cells that overexpress HAS2, HAS3, or Hyal1 individually, and compared these cells with co-transfectants expressing Hyal1 + HAS2 or Hyal1 + HAS3. Cells expressing only HAS were less tumorigenic than vector control transfectants on orthotopic injection into mice. In contrast, cells co-expressing Hyal1 + HAS2 or Hyal1 + HAS3 showed greater than sixfold and twofold increases in tumorigenesis, respectively. Fluorescence and histological quantification revealed spontaneous lymph node metastasis in all Hyal1 transfectant-implanted mice, and node burden increased an additional twofold when Hyal1 and HAS were co-expressed. Cells only expressing HAS were not metastatic. Thus, excess HA synthesis and processing in concert accelerate the acquisition of a metastatic phenotype by prostate tumor cells. Intratumoral vascularity did not correlate with either tumor size or metastatic potential. Analysis of cell cycle progression revealed shortened doubling times of Hyal1-expressing cells. Both adhesion and motility on extracellular matrix were diminished in HA-overproducing cells; however, motility was increased twofold by Hyal1 expression and fourfold to sixfold by Hyal1/HAS co-expression, in close agreement with observed metastatic potential. This is the first comprehensive examination of these enzymes in a relevant prostate cancer microenvironment.
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Participation of leaky ribosome scanning in protein dual targeting by alternative translation initiation in higher plants.
Plant Cell
PUBLISHED: 01-30-2009
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Postendosymbiotic evolution has given rise to proteins that are multiply targeted within the cell. Various mechanisms have been identified to permit the expression of proteins encoding distinct N termini from a single gene. One mechanism involves alternative translation initiation (aTI). We previously showed evidence of aTI activity within the Arabidopsis thaliana organellar DNA polymerase gene POLgamma2. Translation initiates at four distinct sites within this gene, two non-AUG, to produce distinct plastid and mitochondrially targeted forms of the protein. To understand the regulation of aTI in higher plants, we used Polgamma2 as a model to investigate both cis- and trans-acting features of the process. Here, we show that aTI in Polgamma2 and other plant genes involves ribosome scanning dependent on sequence context at the multiple initiation sites to condition specific binding of at least one trans-acting factor essential for site recognition. Multiple active translation initiation sites appear to operate in several plant genes, often to expand protein targeting. In plants, where the mitochondrion and plastid must share a considerable portion of their proteomes and coordinate their functions, leaky ribosome scanning behavior provides adaptive advantage in the evolution of protein dual targeting and translational regulation.
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Phylloquinone (vitamin K(1) ) biosynthesis in plants: two peroxisomal thioesterases of lactobacillales origin hydrolyze 1,4-dihydroxy-2-naphthoyl-coa.
Plant J.
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It is not known how plants cleave the thioester bond of 1,4-dihydroxy-2-naphthoyl-CoA (DHNA-CoA), a necessary step to form the naphthoquinone ring of phylloquinone (vitamin K(1) ). In fact, only recently has the hydrolysis of DHNA-CoA been demonstrated to be enzyme driven in vivo, and the cognate thioesterase characterized in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis. With a few exceptions in certain prokaryotic (Sorangium and Opitutus) and eukaryotic (Cyanidium, Cyanidioschyzon and Paulinella) organisms, orthologs of DHNA-CoA thioesterase are missing outside of the cyanobacterial lineage. In this study, genomic approaches and functional complementation experiments identified two Arabidopsis genes encoding functional DHNA-CoA thioesterases. The deduced plant proteins display low percentages of identity with cyanobacterial DHNA-CoA thioesterases, and do not even share the same catalytic motif. GFP-fusion experiments demonstrated that the Arabidopsis proteins are targeted to peroxisomes, and subcellular fractionations of Arabidopsis leaves confirmed that DHNA-CoA thioesterase activity occurs in this organelle. In vitro assays with various aromatic and aliphatic acyl-CoA thioester substrates showed that the recombinant Arabidopsis enzymes preferentially hydrolyze DHNA-CoA. Cognate T-DNA knock-down lines display reduced DHNA-CoA thioesterase activity and phylloquinone content, establishing in vivo evidence that the Arabidopsis enzymes are involved in phylloquinone biosynthesis. Extraordinarily, structure-based phylogenies coupled to comparative genomics demonstrate that plant DHNA-CoA thioesterases originate from a horizontal gene transfer with a bacterial species of the Lactobacillales order.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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