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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
A quantitative 14-3-3 interaction screen connects the nuclear exosome targeting complex to the DNA damage response.
Genes Dev.
PUBLISHED: 09-04-2014
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RNA metabolism is altered following DNA damage, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Through a 14-3-3 interaction screen for DNA damage-induced protein interactions in human cells, we identified protein complexes connected to RNA biology. These include the nuclear exosome targeting (NEXT) complex that regulates turnover of noncoding RNAs termed promoter upstream transcripts (PROMPTs). We show that the NEXT subunit RBM7 is phosphorylated upon DNA damage by the MAPKAPK2 kinase and establish that this mediates 14-3-3 binding and decreases PROMPT binding. These findings and our observation that cells lacking RBM7 display DNA damage hypersensitivity link PROMPT turnover to the DNA damage response.
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UBL5 is essential for pre-mRNA splicing and sister chromatid cohesion in human cells.
EMBO Rep.
PUBLISHED: 08-04-2014
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UBL5 is an atypical ubiquitin-like protein, whose function in metazoans remains largely unexplored. We show that UBL5 is required for sister chromatid cohesion maintenance in human cells. UBL5 primarily associates with spliceosomal proteins, and UBL5 depletion decreases pre-mRNA splicing efficiency, leading to globally enhanced intron retention. Defective sister chromatid cohesion is a general consequence of dysfunctional pre-mRNA splicing, resulting from the selective downregulation of the cohesion protection factor Sororin. As the UBL5 yeast orthologue, Hub1, also promotes spliceosome functions, our results show that UBL5 plays an evolutionary conserved role in pre-mRNA splicing, the integrity of which is essential for the fidelity of chromosome segregation.
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Time-resolved dissection of early phosphoproteome and ensuing proteome changes in response to TGF-?.
Sci Signal
PUBLISHED: 07-25-2014
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Transforming growth factor-? (TGF-?) signaling promotes cell motility by inducing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transitions (EMTs) in normal physiology and development, as well as in pathological conditions, such as cancer. We performed a time-resolved analysis of the proteomic and phosphoproteomic changes of cultured human keratinocytes undergoing EMT and cell cycle arrest in response to stimulation with TGF-?. We quantified significant changes in 2079 proteins and 2892 phosphorylation sites regulated by TGF-?. We identified several proteins known to be involved in TGF-?-induced cellular processes, such as the cytostatic response, extracellular matrix remodeling, and epithelial dedifferentiation. In addition, we identified proteins involved in other cellular functions, such as vesicle trafficking, that were not previously associated with TGF-? signaling. Although many TGF-? responses are mediated by phosphorylation of the transcriptional regulators of the SMAD family by the TGF-? receptor complex, we observed rapid kinetics of changes in protein phosphorylation, indicating that many responses were mediated through SMAD-independent TGF-? signaling. Combined analysis of changes in protein abundance and phosphorylation and knowledge of protein interactions and transcriptional regulation provided a comprehensive representation of the dynamic signaling events underlying TGF-?-induced changes in cell behavior. Our data suggest that in epithelial cells stimulated with TGF-?, early signaling is a mixture of both pro- and antiproliferative signals, whereas later signaling primarily inhibits proliferation.
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The growing landscape of lysine acetylation links metabolism and cell signalling.
Nat. Rev. Mol. Cell Biol.
PUBLISHED: 07-24-2014
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Lysine acetylation is a conserved protein post-translational modification that links acetyl-coenzyme A metabolism and cellular signalling. Recent advances in the identification and quantification of lysine acetylation by mass spectrometry have increased our understanding of lysine acetylation, implicating it in many biological processes through the regulation of protein interactions, activity and localization. In addition, proteins are frequently modified by other types of acylations, such as formylation, butyrylation, propionylation, succinylation, malonylation, myristoylation, glutarylation and crotonylation. The intricate link between lysine acylation and cellular metabolism has been clarified by the occurrence of several such metabolite-sensitive acylations and their selective removal by sirtuin deacylases. These emerging findings point to new functions for different lysine acylations and deacylating enzymes and also highlight the mechanisms by which acetylation regulates various cellular processes.
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Convergence of ubiquitylation and phosphorylation signaling in rapamycin-treated yeast cells.
Mol. Cell Proteomics
PUBLISHED: 06-24-2014
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The target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase senses the availability of nutrients and coordinates cellular growth and proliferation with nutrient abundance. Inhibition of TOR mimics nutrient starvation and leads to the reorganization of many cellular processes, including autophagy, protein translation, and vesicle trafficking. TOR regulates cellular physiology by modulating phosphorylation and ubiquitylation signaling networks; however, the global scope of such regulation is not fully known. Here, we used a mass-spectrometry-based proteomics approach for the parallel quantification of ubiquitylation, phosphorylation, and proteome changes in rapamycin-treated yeast cells. Our data constitute a detailed proteomic analysis of rapamycin-treated yeast with 3590 proteins, 8961 phosphorylation sites, and 2299 di-Gly modified lysines (putative ubiquitylation sites) quantified. The phosphoproteome was extensively modulated by rapamycin treatment, with more than 900 up-regulated sites one hour after rapamycin treatment. Dynamically regulated phosphoproteins were involved in diverse cellular processes, prominently including transcription, membrane organization, vesicle-mediated transport, and autophagy. Several hundred ubiquitylation sites were increased after rapamycin treatment, and about half as many decreased in abundance. We found that proteome, phosphorylation, and ubiquitylation changes converged on the Rsp5-ubiquitin ligase, Rsp5 adaptor proteins, and Rsp5 targets. Putative Rsp5 targets were biased for increased ubiquitylation, suggesting activation of Rsp5 by rapamycin. Rsp5 adaptor proteins, which recruit target proteins for Rsp5-dependent ubiquitylation, were biased for increased phosphorylation. Furthermore, we found that permeases and transporters, which are often ubiquitylated by Rsp5, were biased for reduced ubiquitylation and reduced protein abundance. The convergence of multiple proteome-level changes on the Rsp5 system indicates a key role of this pathway in the response to rapamycin treatment. Collectively, these data reveal new insights into the global proteome dynamics in response to rapamycin treatment and provide a first detailed view of the co-regulation of phosphorylation- and ubiquitylation-dependent signaling networks by this compound.
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Acetylation dynamics and stoichiometry in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.
Mol. Syst. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2014
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Lysine acetylation is a frequently occurring posttranslational modification; however, little is known about the origin and regulation of most sites. Here we used quantitative mass spectrometry to analyze acetylation dynamics and stoichiometry in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that acetylation accumulated in growth-arrested cells in a manner that depended on acetyl-CoA generation in distinct subcellular compartments. Mitochondrial acetylation levels correlated with acetyl-CoA concentration in vivo and acetyl-CoA acetylated lysine residues nonenzymatically in vitro. We developed a method to estimate acetylation stoichiometry and found that the vast majority of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic acetylation had a very low stoichiometry. However, mitochondrial acetylation occurred at a significantly higher basal level than cytoplasmic acetylation, consistent with the distinct acetylation dynamics and higher acetyl-CoA concentration in mitochondria. High stoichiometry acetylation occurred mostly on histones, proteins present in histone acetyltransferase and deacetylase complexes, and on transcription factors. These data show that a majority of acetylation occurs at very low levels in exponentially growing yeast and is uniformly affected by exposure to acetyl-CoA.
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Specificity and commonality of the phosphoinositide-binding proteome analyzed by quantitative mass spectrometry.
Cell Rep
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2014
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Phosphoinositides (PIPs) play key roles in signaling and disease. Using high-resolution quantitative mass spectrometry, we identified PIP-interacting proteins and profiled their binding specificities toward all seven PIP variants. This analysis revealed 405 PIP-binding proteins, which is greater than the total number of phospho- or ubiquitin-binding domains. Translocation and inhibitor assays of identified PIP-binding proteins confirmed that our methodology targets direct interactors. The PIP interactome encompasses proteins from diverse cellular compartments, prominently including the nucleus. Our data set revealed a consensus motif for PI(3,4,5)P3-interacting pleckstrin homology (PH) domains, which enabled in silico identification of phosphoinositide interactors. Members of the dedicator of cytokinesis family C exhibited specificity toward both PI(3,4,5)P3 and PI(4,5)P2. Structurally, this dual specificity is explained by a decreased number of positively charged residues in the L1 subdomain compared with DOCK1. The presented PIP-binding proteome and its specificity toward individual PIPs should be a valuable resource for the community.
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A new cellular stress response that triggers centriolar satellite reorganization and ciliogenesis.
EMBO J.
PUBLISHED: 07-24-2013
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Centriolar satellites are small, granular structures that cluster around centrosomes, but whose biological function and regulation are poorly understood. We show that centriolar satellites undergo striking reorganization in response to cellular stresses such as UV radiation, heat shock, and transcription blocks, invoking acute and selective displacement of the factors AZI1/CEP131, PCM1, and CEP290 from this compartment triggered by activation of the stress-responsive kinase p38/MAPK14. We demonstrate that the E3 ubiquitin ligase MIB1 is a new component of centriolar satellites, which interacts with and ubiquitylates AZI1 and PCM1 and suppresses primary cilium formation. In response to cell stress, MIB1 is abruptly inactivated in a p38-independent manner, leading to loss of AZI1, PCM1, and CEP290 ubiquitylation and concomitant stimulation of ciliogenesis, even in proliferating cells. Collectively, our findings uncover a new two-pronged signalling response, which by coupling p38-dependent phosphorylation with MIB1-catalysed ubiquitylation of ciliogenesis-promoting factors plays an important role in controlling centriolar satellite status and key centrosomal functions in a cell stress-regulated manner.
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RNF111/Arkadia is a SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase that facilitates the DNA damage response.
J. Cell Biol.
PUBLISHED: 06-12-2013
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Protein modifications by ubiquitin and small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) play key roles in cellular signaling pathways. SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligases (STUbLs) directly couple these modifications by selectively recognizing SUMOylated target proteins through SUMO-interacting motifs (SIMs), promoting their K48-linked ubiquitylation and degradation. Only a single mammalian STUbL, RNF4, has been identified. We show that human RNF111/Arkadia is a new STUbL, which used three adjacent SIMs for specific recognition of poly-SUMO2/3 chains, and used Ubc13-Mms2 as a cognate E2 enzyme to promote nonproteolytic, K63-linked ubiquitylation of SUMOylated target proteins. We demonstrate that RNF111 promoted ubiquitylation of SUMOylated XPC (xeroderma pigmentosum C) protein, a central DNA damage recognition factor in nucleotide excision repair (NER) extensively regulated by ultraviolet (UV)-induced SUMOylation and ubiquitylation. Moreover, we show that RNF111 facilitated NER by regulating the recruitment of XPC to UV-damaged DNA. Our findings establish RNF111 as a new STUbL that directly links nonproteolytic ubiquitylation and SUMOylation in the DNA damage response.
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Lysine succinylation is a frequently occurring modification in prokaryotes and eukaryotes and extensively overlaps with acetylation.
Cell Rep
PUBLISHED: 05-08-2013
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Recent studies have shown that lysines can be posttranslationally modified by various types of acylations. However, except for acetylation, very little is known about their scope and cellular distribution. We mapped thousands of succinylation sites in bacteria (E. coli), yeast (S. cerevisiae), human (HeLa) cells, and mouse liver tissue, demonstrating widespread succinylation in diverse organisms. A majority of succinylation sites in bacteria, yeast, and mouse liver were acetylated at the same position. Quantitative analysis of succinylation in yeast showed that succinylation was globally altered by growth conditions and mutations that affected succinyl-coenzyme A (succinyl-CoA) metabolism in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, indicating that succinylation levels are globally affected by succinyl-CoA concentration. We preferentially detected succinylation on abundant proteins, suggesting that succinylation occurs at a low level and that many succinylation sites remain unidentified. These data provide a systems-wide view of succinylation and its dynamic regulation and show its extensive overlap with acetylation.
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OTULIN restricts Met1-linked ubiquitination to control innate immune signaling.
Mol. Cell
PUBLISHED: 05-04-2013
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Conjugation of Met1-linked polyubiquitin (Met1-Ub) by the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) is an important regulatory modification in innate immune signaling. So far, only few Met1-Ub substrates have been described, and the regulatory mechanisms have remained elusive. We recently identified that the ovarian tumor (OTU) family deubiquitinase OTULIN specifically disassembles Met1-Ub. Here, we report that OTULIN is critical for limiting Met1-Ub accumulation after nucleotide-oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2) stimulation, and that OTULIN depletion augments signaling downstream of NOD2. Affinity purification of Met1-Ub followed by quantitative proteomics uncovered RIPK2 as the predominant NOD2-regulated substrate. Accordingly, Met1-Ub on RIPK2 was largely inhibited by overexpressing OTULIN and was increased by OTULIN depletion. Intriguingly, OTULIN-depleted cells spontaneously accumulated Met1-Ub on LUBAC components, and NOD2 or TNFR1 stimulation led to extensive Met1-Ub accumulation on receptor complex components. We propose that OTULIN restricts Met1-Ub formation after immune receptor stimulation to prevent unwarranted proinflammatory signaling.
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Acetyl-phosphate is a critical determinant of lysine acetylation in E. coli.
Mol. Cell
PUBLISHED: 04-05-2013
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Lysine acetylation is a frequently occurring posttranslational modification in bacteria; however, little is known about its origin and regulation. Using the model bacterium Escherichia coli (E. coli), we found that most acetylation occurred at a low level and accumulated in growth-arrested cells in a manner that depended on the formation of acetyl-phosphate (AcP) through glycolysis. Mutant cells unable to produce AcP had significantly reduced acetylation levels, while mutant cells unable to convert AcP to acetate had significantly elevated acetylation levels. We showed that AcP can chemically acetylate lysine residues in vitro and that AcP levels are correlated with acetylation levels in vivo, suggesting that AcP may acetylate proteins nonenzymatically in cells. These results uncover a critical role for AcP in bacterial acetylation and indicate that most acetylation in E. coli occurs at a low level and is dynamically affected by metabolism and cell proliferation in a global, uniform manner.
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A proteome-wide, quantitative survey of in vivo ubiquitylation sites reveals widespread regulatory roles.
Mol. Cell Proteomics
PUBLISHED: 09-01-2011
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Post-translational modification of proteins by ubiquitin is a fundamentally important regulatory mechanism. However, proteome-wide analysis of endogenous ubiquitylation remains a challenging task, and almost always has relied on cells expressing affinity tagged ubiquitin. Here we combine single-step immunoenrichment of ubiquitylated peptides with peptide fractionation and high-resolution mass spectrometry to investigate endogenous ubiquitylation sites. We precisely map 11,054 endogenous putative ubiquitylation sites (diglycine-modified lysines) on 4,273 human proteins. The presented data set covers 67% of the known ubiquitylation sites and contains 10,254 novel sites on proteins with diverse cellular functions including cell signaling, receptor endocytosis, DNA replication, DNA damage repair, and cell cycle progression. Our method enables site-specific quantification of ubiquitylation in response to cellular perturbations and is applicable to any cell type or tissue. Global quantification of ubiquitylation in cells treated with the proteasome inhibitor MG-132 discovers sites that are involved in proteasomal degradation, and suggests a nonproteasomal function for almost half of all sites. Surprisingly, ubiquitylation of about 15% of sites decreased more than twofold within four hours of MG-132 treatment, showing that inhibition of proteasomal function can dramatically reduce ubiquitylation on many sites with non-proteasomal functions. Comparison of ubiquitylation sites with acetylation sites reveals an extensive overlap between the lysine residues targeted by these two modifications. However, the crosstalk between these two post-translational modifications is significantly less frequent on sites that show increased ubiquitylation upon proteasome inhibition. Taken together, we report the largest site-specific ubiquitylation dataset in human cells, and for the first time demonstrate proteome-wide, site-specific quantification of endogenous putative ubiquitylation sites.
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Proteome-wide mapping of the Drosophila acetylome demonstrates a high degree of conservation of lysine acetylation.
Sci Signal
PUBLISHED: 07-28-2011
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Posttranslational modification of proteins by acetylation and phosphorylation regulates most cellular processes in living organisms. Surprisingly, the evolutionary conservation of phosphorylated serine and threonine residues is only marginally higher than that of unmodified serines and threonines. With high-resolution mass spectrometry, we identified 1981 lysine acetylation sites in the proteome of Drosophila melanogaster. We used data sets of experimentally identified acetylation and phosphorylation sites in Drosophila and humans to analyze the evolutionary conservation of these modification sites between flies and humans. Site-level conservation analysis revealed that acetylation sites are highly conserved, significantly more so than phosphorylation sites. Furthermore, comparison of lysine conservation in Drosophila and humans with that in nematodes and zebrafish revealed that acetylated lysines were significantly more conserved than were nonacetylated lysines. Bioinformatics analysis using Gene Ontology terms suggested that the proteins with conserved acetylation control cellular processes such as protein translation, protein folding, DNA packaging, and mitochondrial metabolism. We found that acetylation of ubiquitin-conjugating E2 enzymes was evolutionarily conserved, and mutation of a conserved acetylation site impaired the function of the human E2 enzyme UBE2D3. This systems-level analysis of comparative posttranslational modification showed that acetylation is an anciently conserved modification and suggests that phosphorylation sites may have evolved faster than acetylation sites.
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A phospho-proteomic screen identifies substrates of the checkpoint kinase Chk1.
Genome Biol.
PUBLISHED: 06-21-2011
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The cell-cycle checkpoint kinase Chk1 is essential in mammalian cells due to its roles in controlling processes such as DNA replication, mitosis and DNA-damage responses. Despite its paramount importance, how Chk1 controls these functions remains unclear, mainly because very few Chk1 substrates have hitherto been identified.
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Phosphorylation of the autophagy receptor optineurin restricts Salmonella growth.
Science
PUBLISHED: 05-26-2011
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Selective autophagy can be mediated via receptor molecules that link specific cargoes to the autophagosomal membranes decorated by ubiquitin-like microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) modifiers. Although several autophagy receptors have been identified, little is known about mechanisms controlling their functions in vivo. In this work, we found that phosphorylation of an autophagy receptor, optineurin, promoted selective autophagy of ubiquitin-coated cytosolic Salmonella enterica. The protein kinase TANK binding kinase 1 (TBK1) phosphorylated optineurin on serine-177, enhancing LC3 binding affinity and autophagic clearance of cytosolic Salmonella. Conversely, ubiquitin- or LC3-binding optineurin mutants and silencing of optineurin or TBK1 impaired Salmonella autophagy, resulting in increased intracellular bacterial proliferation. We propose that phosphorylation of autophagy receptors might be a general mechanism for regulation of cargo-selective autophagy.
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Human SIRT6 promotes DNA end resection through CtIP deacetylation.
Science
PUBLISHED: 09-11-2010
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SIRT6 belongs to the sirtuin family of protein lysine deacetylases, which regulate aging and genome stability. We found that human SIRT6 has a role in promoting DNA end resection, a crucial step in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination. SIRT6 depletion impaired the accumulation of replication protein A and single-stranded DNA at DNA damage sites, reduced rates of homologous recombination, and sensitized cells to DSB-inducing agents. We identified the DSB resection protein CtIP [C-terminal binding protein (CtBP) interacting protein] as a SIRT6 interaction partner and showed that SIRT6-dependent CtIP deacetylation promotes resection. A nonacetylatable CtIP mutant alleviated the effect of SIRT6 depletion on resection, thus identifying CtIP as a key substrate by which SIRT6 facilitates DSB processing and homologous recombination. These findings further clarify how SIRT6 promotes genome stability.
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Predicting post-translational lysine acetylation using support vector machines.
Bioinformatics
PUBLISHED: 05-26-2010
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Lysine acetylation is a post-translational protein modification and a primary regulatory mechanism that controls many cell signaling processes. Lysine acetylation sites are recognized by acetyltransferases and deacetylases through sequence patterns (motifs). Recently, we used high-resolution mass spectrometry to identify 3600 lysine acetylation sites on 1750 human proteins covering most of the previously annotated sites and providing the most comprehensive acetylome so far. This dataset should provide an excellent source to train support vector machines (SVMs) allowing the high accuracy in silico prediction of acetylated lysine residues.
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Decoding signalling networks by mass spectrometry-based proteomics.
Nat. Rev. Mol. Cell Biol.
PUBLISHED: 05-12-2010
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Signalling networks regulate essentially all of the biology of cells and organisms in normal and disease states. Signalling is often studied using antibody-based techniques such as western blots. Large-scale precision proteomics based on mass spectrometry now enables the system-wide characterization of signalling events at the levels of post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions and changes in protein expression. This technology delivers accurate and unbiased information about the quantitative changes of thousands of proteins and their modifications in response to any perturbation. Current studies focus on phosphorylation, but acetylation, methylation, glycosylation and ubiquitylation are also becoming amenable to investigation. Large-scale proteomics-based signalling research will fundamentally change our understanding of signalling networks.
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Lysine acetylation targets protein complexes and co-regulates major cellular functions.
Science
PUBLISHED: 07-16-2009
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Lysine acetylation is a reversible posttranslational modification of proteins and plays a key role in regulating gene expression. Technological limitations have so far prevented a global analysis of lysine acetylations cellular roles. We used high-resolution mass spectrometry to identify 3600 lysine acetylation sites on 1750 proteins and quantified acetylation changes in response to the deacetylase inhibitors suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and MS-275. Lysine acetylation preferentially targets large macromolecular complexes involved in diverse cellular processes, such as chromatin remodeling, cell cycle, splicing, nuclear transport, and actin nucleation. Acetylation impaired phosphorylation-dependent interactions of 14-3-3 and regulated the yeast cyclin-dependent kinase Cdc28. Our data demonstrate that the regulatory scope of lysine acetylation is broad and comparable with that of other major posttranslational modifications.
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Mislocalized activation of oncogenic RTKs switches downstream signaling outcomes.
Mol. Cell
PUBLISHED: 06-19-2009
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Inappropriate activation of oncogenic kinases at intracellular locations is frequently observed in human cancers, but its effects on global signaling are incompletely understood. Here, we show that the oncogenic mutant of Flt3 (Flt3-ITD), when localized at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), aberrantly activates STAT5 and upregulates its targets, Pim-1/2, but fails to activate PI3K and MAPK signaling. Conversely, membrane targeting of Flt3-ITD strongly activates the MAPK and PI3K pathways, with diminished phosphorylation of STAT5. Global phosphoproteomics quantified 12,186 phosphorylation sites, confirmed compartment-dependent activation of these pathways and discovered many additional components of Flt3-ITD signaling. The differential activation of Akt and Pim kinases by ER-retained Flt3-ITD helped to identify their putative targets. Surprisingly, we find spatial regulation of tyrosine phosphorylation patterns of the receptor itself. Thus, intracellular activation of RTKs by oncogenic mutations in the biosynthetic route may exploit cellular architecture to initiate aberrant signaling cascades, thus evading negative regulation.
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Proteomic investigations of lysine acetylation identify diverse substrates of mitochondrial deacetylase sirt3.
PLoS ONE
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Lysine acetylation is a posttranslational modification that is dynamically regulated by the activity of acetyltransferases and deacetylases. The human and mouse genomes encode 18 different lysine deacetylases (KDACs) which are key regulators of many cellular processes. Identifying substrates of KDACs and pinpointing the regulated acetylation sites on target proteins may provide important information about the molecular basis of their functions. Here we apply quantitative proteomics to identify endogenous substrates of the mitochondrial deacetylase Sirtuin 3 (Sirt3) by comparing site-specific acetylation in wild-type murine embryonic fibroblasts to Sirt3 knockout cells. We confirm Sirt3-regulated acetylation of several mitochondrial proteins in human cells by comparing acetylation in U2OS cells overexpressing Sirt3 to U2OS cells in which Sirt3 expression was reduced by shRNA. Our data demonstrate that ablation of Sirt3 significantly increases acetylation at dozens of sites on mitochondrial proteins. Substrates of Sirt3 are implicated in various metabolic pathways, including fatty acid metabolism and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. These results imply broader regulatory roles of Sirt3 in the mitochondria by modulating acetylation on diverse substrates. The experimental strategy described here is generic and can be applied to identify endogenous substrates of other lysine deacetylases.
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DVC1 (C1orf124) is a DNA damage-targeting p97 adaptor that promotes ubiquitin-dependent responses to replication blocks.
Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol.
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Ubiquitin-mediated processes orchestrate critical DNA-damage signaling and repair pathways. We identify human DVC1 (C1orf124; Spartan) as a cell cycle-regulated anaphase-promoting complex (APC) substrate that accumulates at stalled replication forks. DVC1 recruitment to sites of replication stress requires its ubiquitin-binding UBZ domain and PCNA-binding PIP box motif but is independent of RAD18-mediated PCNA monoubiquitylation. Via a conserved SHP box, DVC1 recruits the ubiquitin-selective chaperone p97 to blocked replication forks, which may facilitate p97-dependent removal of translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerase ? (Pol ?) from monoubiquitylated PCNA. DVC1 knockdown enhances UV light-induced mutagenesis, and depletion of human DVC1 or the Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog DVC-1 causes hypersensitivity to replication stress-inducing agents. Our findings establish DVC1 as a DNA damage-targeting p97 adaptor that protects cells from deleterious consequences of replication blocks and suggest an important role of p97 in ubiquitin-dependent regulation of TLS.
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Systems-wide analysis of ubiquitylation dynamics reveals a key role for PAF15 ubiquitylation in DNA-damage bypass.
Nat. Cell Biol.
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Protein ubiquitylation has emerged as a key regulatory mechanism in DNA-damage signalling and repair pathways. We report a proteome-wide, site-specific survey of ubiquitylation changes after ultraviolet irradiation, identifying numerous upregulated and downregulated ubiquitylation sites on known components of DNA-damage signalling, as well as on proteins not previously implicated in this process. Our results uncover a critical role for PCNA-associated factor PAF15 (p15(PAF)/KIAA0101) ubiquitylation during DNA replication. During unperturbed S phase, chromatin-associated PAF15 is modified by double mono-ubiquitylation of Lys 15 and 24 templated through PCNA binding. Replication blocks trigger rapid, proteasome-dependent removal of Lys 15/24-ubiquitylated PAF15 from PCNA, facilitating bypass of replication-fork-blocking lesions by allowing recruitment of translesion DNA synthesis polymerase pol? to mono-ubiquitylated PCNA at stalled replisomes. Our findings demonstrate widespread involvement of ubiquitin signalling in genotoxic-stress responses and identify a critical function for dynamic PAF15 ubiquitylation in safeguarding genome integrity when DNA replication is challenged.
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Proteomic analysis of lysine acetylation sites in rat tissues reveals organ specificity and subcellular patterns.
Cell Rep
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Lysine acetylation is a major posttranslational modification involved in a broad array of physiological functions. Here, we provide an organ-wide map of lysine acetylation sites from 16 rat tissues analyzed by high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry. We quantify 15,474 modification sites on 4,541 proteins and provide the data set as a web-based database. We demonstrate that lysine acetylation displays site-specific sequence motifs that diverge between cellular compartments, with a significant fraction of nuclear sites conforming to the consensus motifs G-AcK and AcK-P. Our data set reveals that the subcellular acetylation distribution is tissue-type dependent and that acetylation targets tissue-specific pathways involved in fundamental physiological processes. We compare lysine acetylation patterns for rat as well as human skeletal muscle biopsies and demonstrate its general involvement in muscle contraction. Furthermore, we illustrate that acetylation of fructose-bisphosphate aldolase and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase serves as a cellular mechanism to switch off enzymatic activity.
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Proteome-wide analysis of lysine acetylation suggests its broad regulatory scope in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.
Mol. Cell Proteomics
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Post-translational modification of proteins by lysine acetylation plays important regulatory roles in living cells. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely used unicellular eukaryotic model organism in biomedical research. S. cerevisiae contains several evolutionary conserved lysine acetyltransferases and deacetylases. However, only a few dozen acetylation sites in S. cerevisiae are known, presenting a major obstacle for further understanding the regulatory roles of acetylation in this organism. Here we use high resolution mass spectrometry to identify about 4000 lysine acetylation sites in S. cerevisiae. Acetylated proteins are implicated in the regulation of diverse cytoplasmic and nuclear processes including chromatin organization, mitochondrial metabolism, and protein synthesis. Bioinformatic analysis of yeast acetylation sites shows that acetylated lysines are significantly more conserved compared with nonacetylated lysines. A large fraction of the conserved acetylation sites are present on proteins involved in cellular metabolism, protein synthesis, and protein folding. Furthermore, quantification of the Rpd3-regulated acetylation sites identified several previously known, as well as new putative substrates of this deacetylase. Rpd3 deficiency increased acetylation of the SAGA (Spt-Ada-Gcn5-Acetyltransferase) complex subunit Sgf73 on K33. This acetylation site is located within a critical regulatory domain in Sgf73 that interacts with Ubp8 and is involved in the activation of the Ubp8-containing histone H2B deubiquitylase complex. Our data provides the first global survey of acetylation in budding yeast, and suggests a wide-ranging regulatory scope of this modification. The provided dataset may serve as an important resource for the functional analysis of lysine acetylation in eukaryotes.
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Proteomic analyses reveal divergent ubiquitylation site patterns in murine tissues.
Mol. Cell Proteomics
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Posttranslational modifications of proteins increase the complexity of the cellular proteome and enable rapid regulation of protein functions in response to environmental changes. Protein ubiquitylation is a central regulatory posttranslational modification that controls numerous biological processes including proteasomal degradation of proteins, DNA damage repair and innate immune responses. Here we combine high-resolution mass spectrometry with single-step immunoenrichment of di-glycine modified peptides for mapping of endogenous putative ubiquitylation sites in murine tissues. We identify more than 20,000 unique ubiquitylation sites on proteins involved in diverse biological processes. Our data reveals that ubiquitylation regulates core signaling pathways common for each of the studied tissues. In addition, we discover that ubiquitylation regulates tissue-specific signaling networks. Many tissue-specific ubiquitylation sites were obtained from brain highlighting the complexity and unique physiology of this organ. We further demonstrate that different di-glycine-lysine-specific monoclonal antibodies exhibit sequence preferences, and that their complementary use increases the depth of ubiquitylation site analysis, thereby providing a more unbiased view of protein ubiquitylation.
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SOCS1 cooperates with FLT3-ITD in the development of myeloproliferative disease by promoting the escape from external cytokine control.
Blood
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Activating mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinase FLT3 are frequently found in acute myelogenous leukemia patients and confer poor clinical prognosis. It is unclear how leukemic blasts escape cytokine control that regulates normal hematopoiesis. We have recently demonstrated that FLT3-internal tandem duplication (ITD), when localized to the biosynthetic compartment, aberrantly activates STAT5. Here, we show that one of the target genes induced by STAT5 is suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)1-a surprising finding for a known tumor suppressor. Although SOCS1 expression in murine bone marrow severely impaired cytokine-induced colony growth, it failed to inhibit FLT3-ITD-supported colony growth, indicating resistance of FLT3-ITD to SOCS1. In addition, SOCS1 coexpression did not affect FLT3-ITD-mediated signaling or proliferation. Importantly, SOCS1 coexpression inhibited interferon-? and interferon-? signaling and protected FLT3-ITD hematopoietic cells from interferon-mediated growth inhibitory effects. In a murine bone marrow transplantation model, the coexpression of SOCS1 and FLT3-ITD significantly shortened the latency of a myeloproliferative disease compared with FLT3-ITD alone (P < .01). Mechanistically, SOCS proteins shield FLT3-ITD from external cytokine control, thereby promoting leukemogenesis. The data demonstrate that SOCS1 acts as a conditional oncogene, providing novel molecular insights into cytokine resistance in oncogenic transformation. Restoring cytokine control may provide a new way of therapeutic intervention.
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Proteomic investigations reveal a role for RNA processing factor THRAP3 in the DNA damage response.
Mol. Cell
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The regulatory networks of the DNA damage response (DDR) encompass many proteins and posttranslational modifications. Here, we use mass spectrometry-based proteomics to analyze the systems-wide response to DNA damage by parallel quantification of the DDR-regulated phosphoproteome, acetylome, and proteome. We show that phosphorylation-dependent signaling networks are regulated more strongly compared to acetylation. Among the phosphorylated proteins identified are many putative substrates of DNA-PK, ATM, and ATR kinases, but a majority of phosphorylated proteins do not share the ATM/ATR/DNA-PK target consensus motif, suggesting an important role of downstream kinases in amplifying DDR signals. We show that the splicing-regulator phosphatase PPM1G is recruited to sites of DNA damage, while the splicing-associated protein THRAP3 is excluded from these regions. Moreover, THRAP3 depletion causes cellular hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Collectively, these data broaden our knowledge of DNA damage signaling networks and highlight an important link between RNA metabolism and DNA repair.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.