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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Gene therapy for Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome--long-term efficacy and genotoxicity.
Sci Transl Med
PUBLISHED: 03-14-2014
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Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is characterized by microthrombocytopenia, immunodeficiency, autoimmunity, and susceptibility to malignancies. In our hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy (GT) trial using a ?-retroviral vector, 9 of 10 patients showed sustained engraftment and correction of WAS protein (WASP) expression in lymphoid and myeloid cells and platelets. GT resulted in partial or complete resolution of immunodeficiency, autoimmunity, and bleeding diathesis. Analysis of retroviral insertion sites revealed >140,000 unambiguous integration sites and a polyclonal pattern of hematopoiesis in all patients early after GT. Seven patients developed acute leukemia [one acute myeloid leukemia (AML), four T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), and two primary T-ALL with secondary AML associated with a dominant clone with vector integration at the LMO2 (six T-ALL), MDS1 (two AML), or MN1 (one AML) locus]. Cytogenetic analysis revealed additional genetic alterations such as chromosomal translocations. This study shows that hematopoietic stem cell GT for WAS is feasible and effective, but the use of ?-retroviral vectors is associated with a substantial risk of leukemogenesis.
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Wnt secretion is required to maintain high levels of Wnt activity in colon cancer cells.
Nat Commun
PUBLISHED: 05-02-2013
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Aberrant regulation of the Wnt/?-catenin pathway has an important role during the onset and progression of colorectal cancer, with over 90% of cases of sporadic colon cancer featuring mutations in APC or ?-catenin. However, it has remained a point of controversy whether these mutations are sufficient to activate the pathway or require additional upstream signals. Here we show that colorectal tumours express elevated levels of Wnt3 and Evi/Wls/GPR177. We found that in colon cancer cells, even in the presence of mutations in APC or ?-catenin, downstream signalling remains responsive to Wnt ligands and receptor proximal signalling. Furthermore, we demonstrate that truncated APC proteins bind ?-catenin and key components of the destruction complex. These results indicate that cells with mutations in APC or ?-catenin depend on Wnt ligands and their secretion for a sufficient level of ?-catenin signalling, which potentially opens new avenues for therapeutic interventions by targeting Wnt secretion via Evi/Wls.
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Transforming growth factor beta receptor 2 (TGFBR2) changes sialylation in the microsatellite unstable (MSI) Colorectal cancer cell line HCT116.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-17-2013
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Aberrant glycosylation is a common feature of many malignancies including colorectal cancers (CRCs). About 15% of CRC show the microsatellite instability (MSI) phenotype that is associated with a high frequency of biallelic frameshift mutations in the A10 coding mononucleotide microsatellite of the transforming growth factor beta receptor 2 (TGFBR2) gene. If and how impaired TGFBR2 signaling in MSI CRC cells affects cell surface glycan pattern is largely unexplored. Here, we used the TGFBR2-deficient MSI colon carcinoma cell line HCT116 as a model system. Stable clones conferring doxycycline (dox)-inducible expression of a single copy wildtype TGFBR2 transgene were generated by recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE). In two independent clones, dox-inducible expression of wildtype TGFBR2 protein and reconstitution of its signaling function was shown. Metabolic labeling experiments using the tritiated sialic acid precursor N-acetyl-D-mannosamine (ManNAc) revealed a significant decline (?30%) of its incorporation into newly synthesized sialoglycoproteins in a TGFBR2-dependent manner. In particular, we detected a significant decrease of sialylated ß1-integrin upon reconstituted TGFBR2 signaling which did not influence ß1-integrin protein turnover. Notably, TGFBR2 reconstitution did not affect the transcript levels of any of the known human sialyltransferases when examined by real-time RT- PCR analysis. These results suggest that reconstituted TGFBR2 signaling in an isogenic MSI cell line model system can modulate sialylation of cell surface proteins like ß1-integrin. Moreover, our model system will be suitable to uncover the underlying molecular mechanisms of altered MSI tumor glycobiology.
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Specific elimination of CD133+ tumor cells with targeted oncolytic measles virus.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-04-2013
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Tumor-initiating cells (TIC) are critical yet evasive targets for the development of more effective antitumoral strategies. The cell surface marker CD133 is frequently used to identify TICs of various tumor entities, including hepatocellular cancer and glioblastoma. Here, we describe oncolytic measles viruses (MV) retargeted to CD133. The viruses, termed MV-141.7 and MV-AC133, infected and selectively lysed CD133(+) tumor cells. Both viruses exerted strong antitumoral effects on human hepatocellular carcinoma growing subcutaneously or multifocally in the peritoneal cavity of nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mice. Notably, the CD133-targeted viruses were more effective in prolonging survival than the parental MV-NSe, which is currently assessed as oncolytic agent in clinical trials. Interestingly, target receptor overexpression or increased spreading kinetics through tumor cells were excluded as being causative for the enhanced oncolytic activity of CD133-targeted viruses. MV-141.7 was also effective in mouse models of orthotopic glioma tumor spheres and primary colon cancer. Our results indicate that CD133-targeted measles viruses selectively eliminate CD133(+) cells from tumor tissue, offering a key tool for research in tumor biology and cancer therapy.
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You can count on this: barcoded hematopoietic stem cells.
Cell Stem Cell
PUBLISHED: 11-08-2011
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Understanding how individual hematopoietic stem cells contribute to blood formation requires analysis at the single-cell level. Recently in Nature Biotechnology, Lu et al. (2011) tagged HSCs with unique molecular barcodes and used high-throughput sequencing to track their progeny after transplantation.
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Distinct types of tumor-initiating cells form human colon cancer tumors and metastases.
Cell Stem Cell
PUBLISHED: 07-07-2011
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Human colon cancer harbors a small subfraction of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) that is assumed to be a functionally homogeneous stem-cell-like population driving tumor maintenance and metastasis formation. We found unexpected cellular heterogeneity within the TIC compartment, which contains three types of TICs. Extensively self-renewing long-term TICs (LT-TICs) maintained tumor formation in serial xenotransplants. Tumor transient amplifying cells (T-TACs) with limited or no self-renewal capacity contributed to tumor formation only in primary mice. Rare delayed contributing TICs (DC-TICs) were exclusively active in secondary or tertiary mice. Bone marrow was identified as an important reservoir of LT-TICs. Metastasis formation was almost exclusively driven by self-renewing LT-TICs. Our results demonstrate that tumor initiation, self-renewal, and metastasis formation are limited to particular subpopulations of TICs in primary human colon cancer. We identify LT-TICs as a quantifiable target for therapies aimed toward eradication of self-renewing tumorigenic and metastatic colon cancer cells.
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Stem-cell gene therapy for the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome.
N. Engl. J. Med.
PUBLISHED: 11-12-2010
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The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is an X-linked recessive primary immunodeficiency disorder associated with thrombocytopenia, eczema, and autoimmunity. We treated two patients who had this disorder with a transfusion of autologous, genetically modified hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). We found sustained expression of WAS protein expression in HSC, lymphoid and myeloid cells, and platelets after gene therapy. T and B cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and monocytes were functionally corrected. After treatment, the patients clinical condition markedly improved, with resolution of hemorrhagic diathesis, eczema, autoimmunity, and predisposition to severe infection. Comprehensive insertion-site analysis showed vector integration that targeted multiple genes controlling growth and immunologic responses in a persistently polyclonal hematopoiesis. (Funded by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and others; German Clinical Trials Register number, DRKS00000330.).
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Hematopoietic activity of human short-term repopulating cells in mobilized peripheral blood cell transplants is restricted to the first 5 months after transplantation.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 04-09-2010
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Kinetics of hematopoietic recovery driven by different types of human stem and progenitor cells after transplantation are not fully understood. Short-term repopulating cells (STRCs) dominate early hematopoiesis after transplantation. STRCs are highly enriched in adult mobilized peripheral blood compared with cord blood, but the length of their contribution to hematopoiesis remains unclear. To understand posttransplantation durability and lineage contribution of STRCs, we compared repopulation kinetics of mobilized peripheral blood (high STRC content) with cord blood transplants (low STRC content) in long-lived NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid)Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ (IL2RG(-/-)) mice. This comparison demonstrates that quantitative contribution of human STRCs to hematopoiesis is restricted to the first 5 months after transplantation. The ratio of STRCs to long-term repopulating cells dramatically changes during ontogeny. This model enables to precisely determine early and late engraftment kinetics of defined human repopulating cell types and to preclinically assess the engraftment kinetics of engineered stem cell transplants.
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Genomic instability and myelodysplasia with monosomy 7 consequent to EVI1 activation after gene therapy for chronic granulomatous disease.
Nat. Med.
PUBLISHED: 01-24-2010
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Gene-modified autologous hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) can provide ample clinical benefits to subjects suffering from X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD), a rare inherited immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent, often life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections. Here we report on the molecular and cellular events observed in two young adults with X-CGD treated by gene therapy in 2004. After the initial resolution of bacterial and fungal infections, both subjects showed silencing of transgene expression due to methylation of the viral promoter, and myelodysplasia with monosomy 7 as a result of insertional activation of ecotropic viral integration site 1 (EVI1). One subject died from overwhelming sepsis 27 months after gene therapy, whereas a second subject underwent an allogeneic HSC transplantation. Our data show that forced overexpression of EVI1 in human cells disrupts normal centrosome duplication, linking EVI1 activation to the development of genomic instability, monosomy 7 and clonal progression toward myelodysplasia.
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Comprehensive genomic access to vector integration in clinical gene therapy.
Nat. Med.
PUBLISHED: 03-08-2009
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Retroviral vectors have induced subtle clonal skewing in many gene therapy patients and severe clonal proliferation and leukemia in some of them, emphasizing the need for comprehensive integration site analyses to assess the biosafety and genomic pharmacokinetics of vectors and clonal fate of gene-modified cells in vivo. Integration site analyses such as linear amplification-mediated PCR (LAM-PCR) require a restriction digest generating unevenly small fragments of the genome. Here we show that each restriction motif allows for identification of only a fraction of all genomic integrants, hampering the understanding and prediction of biological consequences after vector insertion. We developed a model to define genomic access to the viral integration site that provides optimal restriction motif combinations and minimizes the percentage of nonaccessible insertion loci. We introduce a new nonrestrictive LAM-PCR approach that has superior capabilities for comprehensive unbiased integration site retrieval in preclinical and clinical samples independent of restriction motifs and amplification inefficiency.
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Overexpression of EVI1 interferes with cytokinesis and leads to accumulation of cells with supernumerary centrosomes in G0/1 phase.
Cell Cycle
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Ectopic viral integration site 1 (EVI1), a transcription factor frequently overexpressed in myeloid neoplasias, has been implicated in the generation of malignancy-associated centrosomal aberrations and chromosomal instability. Here, we sought to investigate the underlying cause of centrosome amplification in EVI1-overexpressing cells. We found that overexpression of EVI1-HA in U2OS cells induced supernumerary centrosomes, which were consistently associated with enlarged nuclei or binuclear cells. Live cell imaging experiments identified cytokinesis failure as the underlying cause of this phenotype. In accordance with previous reports, EVI1 overexpression induced a partial cell cycle arrest in G0/1 phase, accompanied by elevated cyclin D1 and p21 levels, reduced Cdk2 activity and activation of the p53 pathway. Supernumerary centrosomes predominantly occurred in resting cells, as identified by low levels of the proliferation marker Ki-67, leading to the conclusion that they result from tetraploidization after cytokinesis failure and are confined to G0/1-arrested tetraploid cells. Depletion of p53 using siRNA revealed that further polyploidization of these cells was inhibited by the p53-dependent tetraploidy checkpoint.
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Stable long-term blood formation by stem cells in murine steady-state hematopoiesis.
Stem Cells
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Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) generate all mature blood cells during the whole lifespan of an individual. However, the clonal contribution of individual HSC and progenitor cells in steady-state hematopoiesis is poorly understood. To investigate the activity of HSCs under steady-state conditions, murine HSC and progenitor cells were genetically marked in vivo by integrating lentiviral vectors (LVs) encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP). Hematopoietic contribution of individual marked clones was monitored by determination of lentiviral integration sites using highly sensitive linear amplification-mediated-polymerase chain reaction. A remarkably stable small proportion of hematopoietic cells expressed GFP in LV-injected animals for up to 24 months, indicating stable marking of murine steady-state hematopoiesis. Analysis of the lentiviral integration sites revealed that multiple hematopoietic clones with both myeloid and lymphoid differentiation potential contributed to long-term hematopoiesis. In contrast to intrafemoral vector injection, intravenous administration of LV preferentially targeted short-lived progenitor cells. Myelosuppressive treatment of mice prior to LV-injection did not affect the marking efficiency. Our study represents the first continuous analysis of clonal behavior of genetically marked hematopoietic cells in an unmanipulated system, providing evidence that multiple clones are simultaneously active in murine steady-state hematopoiesis.
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Targeting of KRAS mutant tumors by HSP90 inhibitors involves degradation of STK33.
J. Exp. Med.
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Previous efforts to develop drugs that directly inhibit the activity of mutant KRAS, the most commonly mutated human oncogene, have not been successful. Cancer cells driven by mutant KRAS require expression of the serine/threonine kinase STK33 for their viability and proliferation, identifying STK33 as a context-dependent therapeutic target. However, specific strategies for interfering with the critical functions of STK33 are not yet available. Here, using a mass spectrometry-based screen for STK33 protein interaction partners, we report that the HSP90/CDC37 chaperone complex binds to and stabilizes STK33 in human cancer cells. Pharmacologic inhibition of HSP90, using structurally divergent small molecules currently in clinical development, induced proteasome-mediated degradation of STK33 in human cancer cells of various tissue origin in vitro and in vivo, and triggered apoptosis preferentially in KRAS mutant cells in an STK33-dependent manner. Furthermore, HSP90 inhibitor treatment impaired sphere formation and viability of primary human colon tumor-initiating cells harboring mutant KRAS. These findings provide mechanistic insight into the activity of HSP90 inhibitors in KRAS mutant cancer cells, indicate that the enhanced requirement for STK33 can be exploited to target mutant KRAS-driven tumors, and identify STK33 depletion through HSP90 inhibition as a biomarker-guided therapeutic strategy with immediate translational potential.
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Extensive methylation of promoter sequences silences lentiviral transgene expression during stem cell differentiation in vivo.
Mol. Ther.
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Lentiviral vectors (LV) are widely used to stably transfer genes into target cells investigating or treating gene functions. In addition, gene transfer into early murine embryos may be improved to efficiently generate transgenic mice. We applied lentiviral gene transfer to generate a mouse model transgenic for SET binding protein-1 (Setbp1) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP). Neither transgenic founders nor their vector-positive offspring transcribed or expressed the transgenes. Bisulfite sequencing of the internal spleen focus-forming virus (SFFV) promoter demonstrated extensive methylation of all analyzed CpGs in the transgenic mice. To analyze the impact of Setbp1 on epigenetic silencing, embryonic stem cells (ESC) were differentiated into cardiomyocytes (CM) in vitro. In contrast to human promoters in LV, virally derived promoter sequences were strongly methylated during differentiation, independent of the transgene. Moreover, the commonly used SFFV promoter (SFFVp) was highly methylated with remarkable strength and frequency during hematopoietic differentiation in vivo in LV but less in ?-retroviral (?-RV) backbones. In summary, we conclude that LV using an internal SFFVp are not suitable to generate transgenic mice or perform constitutive expression studies in differentiating cells. Choosing the appropriate promoter is also crucial to allow stable transgene expression in clinical gene therapy.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.