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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Internet Delivered Diabetes Self-Management Education: A Review.
Diabetes Technol. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 09-20-2014
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Abstract Background: Diabetes self-management education is a cornerstone of successful diabetes management. Various methods have been used to reach the increasing numbers of patients with diabetes, including Internet-based education. The purpose of this article is to review various delivery methods of Internet diabetes education that have been evaluated, as well as their effectiveness in improving diabetes-related outcomes. Materials and Methods: Literature was identified in the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PubMed, Medline, EBSCO, the Cochrane Library, and the Web of Science databases through searches using the following terms: "type 2 diabetes AND internet/web based AND education" and "type 2 diabetes AND diabetes self-management education (DSME) AND web-based/internet OR technology assisted education." The search was limited to English language articles published in the last 10 years. The search yielded 111 articles; of these, 14 met criteria for inclusion in this review. Nine studies were randomized controlled trials, and study lengths varied from 2 weeks to 24 months, for a total of 2,802 participants. Results: DSME delivered via the Internet is effective at improving measures of glycemic control and diabetes knowledge compared with usual care. In addition, results demonstrate that improved eating habits and increased attendance at clinic appointments occur after the online DSME, although engagement and usage of Internet materials waned over time. Interventions that included an element of interaction with healthcare providers were seen as attractive to participants. Conclusions: Internet-delivered diabetes education has the added benefit of easier access for many individuals, and patients can self-pace themselves through materials. More research on the cost-benefits of Internet diabetes education and best methods to maintain patient engagement are needed, along with more studies assessing the long-term impact of Internet-delivered DSME.
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Calling for collaboration: piloting smartphones to discover differences between users and devices.
Teach Learn Med
PUBLISHED: 07-11-2014
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Healthcare technologies and patient care have evolved rapidly. Healthcare communication techniques and technologies have lagged.
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mHealth interventions for weight loss: a guide for achieving treatment fidelity.
J Am Med Inform Assoc
PUBLISHED: 05-22-2014
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mHealth interventions have shown promise for helping people sustain healthy behaviors such as weight loss. However, few have assessed treatment fidelity, that is, the accurate delivery, receipt, and enactment of the intervention. Treatment fidelity is critical because the valid interpretation and translation of intervention studies depend on treatment fidelity assessments. We describe strategies used to assess treatment fidelity in mobile health (mHealth) interventions aimed at sustaining healthy behaviors in weight loss. We reviewed treatment fidelity recommendations for mHealth-based behavioral interventions and described how these recommendations were applied in three recent weight loss studies. We illustrate how treatment fidelity can be supported during study design, training of providers, treatment delivery, receipt of treatment, and enactment of treatment skills. Pre-planned strategies to ensure the treatment fidelity of mHealth interventions will help counter doubts concerning valid conclusions about their effectiveness and allow investigators and clinicians to implement robustly efficacious mobile health programs.
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Feasibility and preliminary effects of a virtual environment for adults with type 2 diabetes: pilot study.
JMIR Res Protoc
PUBLISHED: 03-13-2014
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Innovative interventions that empower patients in diabetes self-management (DSM) are needed to provide accessible, sustainable, cost-effective patient education and support that surpass current noninteractive interventions. Skills acquired in digital virtual environments (VEs) affect behaviors in the physical world. Some VEs are programmed as real-time three-dimensional representations of various settings via the Internet. For this research, a theoretically grounded VE that facilitates DSM was developed and pilot tested. It offered weekly synchronous DSM education classes, group meetings, and social networking in a community in which participants practiced real world skills such as grocery shopping, exercising, and dining out, allowing for interactive knowledge application. The VE was available 24/7 on the Internet, minimizing access barriers.
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A theoretical framework for a virtual diabetes self-management community intervention.
West J Nurs Res
PUBLISHED: 01-21-2014
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Due to its high prevalence, chronic nature, potential complications, and self-management challenges for patients, diabetes presents significant health education and support issues. We developed and pilot-tested a virtual community for adults with type 2 diabetes to promote self-management education and provide social support. Although digital-based programs such as virtual environments can address significant barriers to reaching patients (i.e., child care, transportation, location), they must be strongly grounded in a theoretical basis to be well-developed and effective. In this article, we discuss how we synthesized behavioral and virtual environment theoretical frameworks to guide the development of SLIDES (Second Life Impacts Diabetes Education and Support).
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Evaluation of the use of bar-code medication administration in nursing practice using an evidence-based checklist.
J Nurs Adm
PUBLISHED: 10-25-2013
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The goal of this project was to determine whether the use of bar-code medication administration complied with current evidence as to how it should be used. Using an evidence-based checklist, we performed a gap analysis on bar-code medication administration (BCMA) in an acute care setting. Compliance with current evidence was identified through observation and unstructured nurse interviews. Based on findings from the initial gap analysis, quality improvement initiatives were implemented followed by a reassessment to identify possible improvement of the identified gaps. Initially, there was 72% compliance with current evidence-based practices using BCMA. After implementation of initial quality improvement initiatives targeting 3 of 9 areas with deficits in compliance, compliance was found to be 81%. The evidence-based checklist was helpful in identifying gaps in current performance and opportunities for improvement with BCMA.
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Mobile health messages help sustain recent weight loss.
Am. J. Med.
PUBLISHED: 06-06-2013
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Using regulatory focus theory, an intervention of daily weight loss-sustaining messages was developed and tested for acceptability, feasibility, and efficacy on helping people sustain weight loss.
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Meta-analyses of colorectal cancer risk factors.
Cancer Causes Control
PUBLISHED: 03-26-2013
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Demographic, behavioral, and environmental factors have been associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). We reviewed the published evidence and explored associations between risk factors and CRC incidence.
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Virtual worlds in nursing education: a synthesis of the literature.
J Nurs Educ
PUBLISHED: 02-27-2013
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Although the literature has highlighted the use of virtual worlds in teaching-learning, little is known about the concepts associated with this technology in nursing education. Moreover, the application of virtual worlds to education has been underdeveloped theoretically, with much of the work being exploratory. Thus, the aim of this integrative review was to identify the current evidence on the use of virtual worlds in the education of nursing and other health professional students and to describe emerging themes surrounding this phenomenon. We searched seven electronic databases for relevant articles and used Whittemores and Knafls integrative review method to synthesize the literature. Twelve articles met the selection criteria for this review, from which three overarching themes emerged: (a) critical reasoning skills, (b) student-centered learning, and (c) instructional design considerations. This integrative review extends our understanding of virtual worlds in nursing education and the potential barriers and facilitators of their use.
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Health Information Seeking and Social Media Use on the Internet among People with Diabetes.
Online J Public Health Inform
PUBLISHED: 06-22-2011
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Patients who are active and involved in their self-management and care are more likely to manage chronic conditions effectively (6, 26). With a 5-fold increase in the incidence of chronic illness over the past 20 years, access to information can provide patients the tools and support to self-manage their chronic illness. New media technologies can serve as tools to engage and involve patients in their health care. Due to the increasing ubiquity of the Internet and the availability of health information, patients are more easily able to seek and find information about their health.. Thus, the Internet can serve as a mechanism of empowerment (4, 5). This is especially important for people with diabetes mellitus where intensive self-management is critical.
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Implementation of a user-centered framework in the development of a web-based health information database and call center.
J Biomed Inform
PUBLISHED: 03-02-2011
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As healthcare consumers increasingly turn to the World Wide Web (WWW) to obtain health information, it is imperative that health-related websites are user-centered. Websites are often developed without consideration of intended users characteristics, literacy levels, preferences, and information goals resulting in user dissatisfaction, abandonment of the website, and ultimately the need for costly redesign. This paper provides a methodological review of a user-centered framework that incorporates best practices in literacy, information quality, and human-computer interface design and evaluation to guide the design and redesign process of a consumer health website. Following the description of the methods, a case analysis is presented, demonstrating the successful application of the model in the redesign of a consumer health information website with call center. Comparisons between the iterative revisions of the website showed improvements in usability, readability, and user satisfaction.
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Safety issues related to the electronic medical record (EMR): synthesis of the literature from the last decade, 2000-2009.
J Healthc Manag
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2011
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Healthcare is a complex industry burdened by numerous and complicated clinical and administrative transactions that require many behavioral changes by patients, clinicians, and provider organizations. While healthcare information technology (HIT) is intended to relieve some of the burden by reducing errors, several aspects of systems such as the electronic medical record (EMR) may actually increase the incidence of certain types of errors or produce new safety risks that result in harm. Healthcare leaders must appreciate the complexity surrounding EMRs and understand the safety issues in order to mandate sound EMR design, development, implementation, and use. This article seeks to inform executives, clinicians, and technology professionals what has been learned through published research on the safety of HIT systems during the last decade, focusing on computerized physician order entry (CPOE), clinical decision support systems (CDSS), and bar-coded medication administration (BCMA).
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Can prospective usability evaluation predict data errors?
AMIA Annu Symp Proc
PUBLISHED: 11-13-2010
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Increasing amounts of clinical research data are collected by manual data entry into electronic source systems and directly from research subjects. For this manual entered source data, common methods of data cleaning such as post-entry identification and resolution of discrepancies and double data entry are not feasible. However data accuracy rates achieved without these mechanisms may be higher than desired for a particular research use. We evaluated a heuristic usability method for utility as a tool to independently and prospectively identify data collection form questions associated with data errors. The method evaluated had a promising sensitivity of 64% and a specificity of 67%. The method was used as described in the literature for usability with no further adaptations or specialization for predicting data errors. We conclude that usability evaluation methodology should be further investigated for use in data quality assurance.
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Extensive disease small cell lung cancer dose-response relationships: implications for resistance mechanisms.
J Thorac Oncol
PUBLISHED: 10-01-2010
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Some studies (but not others) suggested that high doses are beneficial in small cell lung cancer (SCLC). We hypothesized that dose-response curve (DRC) shape reflects resistance mechanisms.
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Using virtual environments to enhance nursing distance education.
Creat Nurs
PUBLISHED: 10-01-2010
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Distance education has traditionally been two-dimensional, with limited interaction. Virtual environments enhance distance education learning through real-time interaction and social collaboration that mimic the real world. Virtual environments offer the option to create social and professional relationships that have been a missing component of distance learning.
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A usability problem: conveying health risks to consumers on the Internet.
AMIA Annu Symp Proc
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Effectively designing risk information for the public is challenging and selecting the appropriate medium to deliver disease risk information is crucial. In a usability evaluation of a colon cancer risk website, we evaluated the publics understanding and interpretation of graphical displays of risk information (2 bar graphs). Results from this study suggest that many people do not understand risk and often misinterpret graphical displays of risk and associated terminology. This work shows the importance of not only including representational analysis within user-centered design of consumer health websites, but also evaluating the health and numerical literacy levels of these websites as an aspect of usability testing.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.