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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Sex differences in cardiovascular outcome during progression of aortic valve stenosis.
Heart
PUBLISHED: 10-09-2014
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Women with severe aortic valve stenosis (AS) have better LV systolic function and more concentric LV geometry than their male counterparts. However, sex differences in cardiovascular (CV) outcome during progression of AS have not been reported from a longitudinal prospective study.
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Usefulness of the electrocardiogram in predicting cardiovascular mortality in asymptomatic adults with aortic stenosis (from the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis Study).
Am. J. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 04-27-2014
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Hypertension and coronary heart disease are common in aortic stenosis (AS) and may impair prognosis for similar AS severity. Different changes in the electrocardiogram may be reflective of the separate impacts of AS, hypertension, and coronary heart disease, which could lead to enhanced risk stratification in AS. The aim of this study was therefore to examine if combining prognostically relevant electrocardiographic (ECG) findings improves prediction of cardiovascular mortality in asymptomatic AS. All patients with baseline electrocardiograms in the SEAS study were included. The primary end point was cardiovascular death. Backward elimination (p >0.01) identified heart rate, Q waves, and Cornell voltage-duration product as independently associated with cardiovascular death. Multivariate logistic and Cox regression models were used to evaluate if these 3 ECG variables improved prediction of cardiovascular death. In 1,473 patients followed for a mean of 4.3 years (6,362 patient-years of follow-up), 70 cardiovascular deaths (5%) occurred. In multivariate analysis, heart rate (hazard ratio [HR] 1.5 per 11.2 minute(-1) [1 SD], 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2 to 1.8), sum of Q-wave amplitude (HR 1.3 per 2.0 mm [1 SD], 95% CI 1.1 to 1.6), and Cornell voltage-duration product (HR 1.4 per 763 mm × ms [1 SD], 95% CI 1.2 to 1.7) remained independently associated with cardiovascular death. Combining the prognostic information contained in each of the 3 ECG variables improved integrated discrimination for prediction of cardiovascular death by 2.5%, net reclassification by 14.3%, and area under the curve by 0.06 (all p ?0.04) beyond other important risk factors. ECG findings add incremental predictive information for cardiovascular mortality in asymptomatic patients with AS.
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Impact of obesity and nonobesity on grading the severity of aortic valve stenosis.
Am. J. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-30-2014
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We tested the hypothesis that the disproportionate increase of body surface area in obesity may lead to the overestimation of aortic stenosis (AS) severity when the aortic valve area (AVA) is indexed (AVAI) for body surface area in 1,524 patients enrolled in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in AS study. Obesity was defined as a body mass index of ?30 kg/m(2). Peak aortic jet velocity, mean aortic gradient, AVA, and energy loss (EL) did not differ, although AVAI and EL indexed (ELI) for body surface area were significantly smaller in the obese group (n = 321) compared with the nonobese (n = 1,203) group (both p <0.05). Severe AS by AVAI (<0.6 cm(2)/m(2)) but nonsevere by AVA (>1.0 cm(2); AVAI/AVA discordance) was found in 15% of the patients, whereas severe AS by ELI (<0.6 cm(2)/m(2)) but nonsevere by EL (>1.0 cm(2); ELI/EL discordance) was found in 9% of the patients. Obesity was associated with a 2.4-fold higher prevalence of AVAI/AVA discordance and a 1.6-fold higher prevalence of ELI/EL discordance. Discordant grading was also associated with male gender, larger body size, higher mean aortic gradient, and stroke volume (all p <0.05). During a median follow-up of 4.3 years, 419 patients were referred for aortic valve replacement and 177 patients died or were hospitalized because of heart failure. In the Cox regression analyses, AVAI/AVA discordance was associated with a 28% higher rate of aortic valve replacement (p <0.05) but did not predict the rate of combined death and hospitalization for heart failure. In conclusion, using AVAI and ELI for the grading of stenosis in patients with obesity may lead to overestimation of true AS severity.
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Left atrial volume as predictor of valve replacement and cardiovascular events in patients with asymptomatic mild to moderate aortic stenosis.
Echocardiography
PUBLISHED: 04-01-2013
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Left atrial (LA) size is known to increase with chronically increased left ventricular (LV) filling pressure. We hypothesized that LA volume was predictive of aortic valve replacement (AVR) and cardiovascular events in a large cohort of patients with asymptomatic mild to moderate aortic valve stenosis.
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Effect of overweight and obesity on cardiovascular events in asymptomatic aortic stenosis: a SEAS substudy (Simvastatin Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis).
J. Am. Coll. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 03-26-2013
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This study investigated whether overweight and obesity impacted outcome in patients with aortic valve stenosis (AS).
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Prognostic value of energy loss index in asymptomatic aortic stenosis.
Circulation
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2013
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Aortic valve area index adjusted for pressure recovery (energy loss index [ELI]) has been suggested as a more accurate measure of aortic stenosis (AS) severity, but its prognostic value has not been determined in a prospective study.
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Left atrial systolic force in asymptomatic aortic stenosis.
Echocardiography
PUBLISHED: 08-19-2011
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There is a limited knowledge about left atrial (LA) systolic force (LASF) and its key determinants in patients with asymptomatic mild-moderate aortic stenosis (AS).
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Aortic root geometry in aortic stenosis patients (a SEAS substudy).
Eur J Echocardiogr
PUBLISHED: 04-19-2011
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To report aortic root geometry by echocardiography in a large population of healthy, asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) patients in relation to current vendor-specified requirements for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI).
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Prognostic effect of inappropriately high left ventricular mass in asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis.
Heart
PUBLISHED: 08-18-2010
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In patients with aortic stenosis (AS) left ventricular (LV) myocardial growth may exceed individual needs to compensate LV haemodynamic load leading to inappropriately high LV mass (iLVM), a condition at high risk of adverse cardiovascular events. The prognostic impact of iLVM was determined in 218 patients with asymptomatic severe AS.
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Impact of pressure recovery on echocardiographic assessment of asymptomatic aortic stenosis: a SEAS substudy.
JACC Cardiovasc Imaging
PUBLISHED: 06-15-2010
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The aim of this analysis was to assess the diagnostic importance of pressure recovery in evaluation of aortic stenosis (AS) severity.
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Asymmetric septal hypertrophy - a marker of hypertension in aortic stenosis (a SEAS substudy).
Blood Press.
PUBLISHED: 05-01-2010
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Some patients with aortic stenosis develop asymmetric septal hypertrophy (ASH) that may influence the surgical approach and is associated with higher perioperative morbidity. The aim of this analysis was to characterize further this subtype of aortic stenosis patients.
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Severe obstructive sleep apnea elicits concentric left ventricular geometry.
J. Hypertens.
PUBLISHED: 04-23-2010
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Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has several negative effects on the heart including increase in myocardial end-systolic stress, venous return and sympathetic activity, all potential stimuli of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy. The impact of the severity of OSA on LV geometry is unknown. We hypothesized that OSA is related to concentric LV geometry.
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Effect of obesity on left ventricular mass and systolic function in patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis (a Simvastatin Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis [SEAS] substudy).
Am. J. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 03-30-2010
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Obesity and hypertension are associated with left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy. Whether an increased body mass index (BMI) affects LV hypertrophy in patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis independent of hypertension is not known. We used the clinical blood pressure, BMI, and echocardiographic findings recorded at baseline of 1,703 patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) participating in the Simvastatin Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study. The patient population was divided into 3 BMI classes: normal BMI, 18.5 to 24.9 kg/m(2); overweight, BMI 25.0 to 29.9 kg/m(2); and obese, BMI > or =30.0 kg/m(2). For the total study population, the average blood pressure was 145/82 +/- 20/10 mm Hg, age 67 +/- 10 years, BMI 26.9 +/- 4.3 kg/m(2), and peak transaortic velocity 3.1 +/- 0.5 m/s. The prevalence of hypertension increased with increasing BMI class (43% vs 51% and 63%, p <0.01). The LV mass and prevalence of LV hypertrophy increased with an increasing BMI (22% in normal, 38% in overweight, and 54% in obese patients). The LV ejection fraction and stress-corrected mid-wall fractional shortening decreased (p <0.01 vs normal-weight group). On multiple logistic regression analysis, the presence of LV hypertrophy was associated with a greater BMI (odds ratio 1.15, 95% confidence interval 1.12 to 1.18), independent of a history of hypertension, the severity of AS, older age, systolic blood pressure, and lower LV ejection fraction (all p <0.05). Valve regurgitation and gender had no independent association with the presence of LV hypertrophy. In conclusion, a greater BMI was associated with the presence of LV hypertrophy in patients with asymptomatic AS, independent of AS severity and the presence of hypertension.
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Left atrial size and force in patients with systolic chronic heart failure: Comparison with healthy controls and different cardiac diseases.
Exp Clin Cardiol
PUBLISHED: 03-01-2010
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Left atrial (LA) systolic force (LASF) is significantly increased in chronic heart failure (CHF), arterial hypertension (HT) and aortic stenosis (AS). The increase is proportional to the degree of left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction.
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Myocardial deformation in aortic valve stenosis: relation to left ventricular geometry.
Heart
PUBLISHED: 08-25-2009
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To assess left ventricular (LV) strain and displacement and their relations to LV geometry in patients with aortic stenosis (AS).
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Low-flow aortic stenosis in asymptomatic patients: valvular-arterial impedance and systolic function from the SEAS Substudy.
JACC Cardiovasc Imaging
PUBLISHED: 07-08-2009
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This study sought to assess the impact of valvuloarterial impedance on left ventricular (LV) myocardial systolic function in asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis (AS).
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Global left ventricular load in asymptomatic aortic stenosis: covariates and prognostic implication (the SEAS trial).
Cardiovasc Ultrasound
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Valvuloarterial impedance (Zva) is a measure of global (combined valvular and arterial) load opposing left ventricular (LV) ejection in aortic stenosis (AS). The present study identified covariates and tested the prognostic significance of global LV load in patients with asymptomatic AS.
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Left atrial systolic force and outcome in asymptomatic mild to moderate aortic stenosis.
Echocardiography
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In patients with chronic pressure overload due to hypertension or aortic valve stenosis (AS), higher left atrial systolic force (LASF) is associated with a high-risk cardiovascular (CV) phenotype. We tested LASF as prognostic marker in patients with AS.
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Hypertension in aortic stenosis: implications for left ventricular structure and cardiovascular events.
Hypertension
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The impact of hypertension on left ventricular structure and outcome during progression of aortic valve stenosis has not been reported from a large prospective study. Data from 1616 patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis randomized to placebo-controlled treatment with combined simvastatin and ezetimibe in the Simvastatin Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis Study were used. The primary study end point included combined cardiovascular death, aortic valve events, and ischemic cardiovascular events. Hypertension was defined as history of hypertension or elevated baseline blood pressure. Left ventricular hypertrophy was defined as left ventricular mass/height(2.7) ? 46.7 g/m(2.7) in women and ? 49.2 g/m(2.7) in men and concentric geometry as relative wall thickness ? 0.43. Baseline peak aortic jet velocity and aortic stenosis progression rate did not differ between hypertensive (n = 1340) and normotensive (n = 276) patients. During 4.3 years of follow-up, the prevalence of concentric left ventricular hypertrophy increased 3 times in both groups. Hypertension predicted 51% higher incidence of abnormal LV geometry at final study visit independent of other confounders (P<0.01). In time-varying Cox regression, hypertension did not predict increased rate of the primary study end point. However, hypertension was associated with a 56% higher rate of ischemic cardiovascular events and a 2-fold increased mortality (both P<0.01), independent of aortic stenosis severity, abnormal left ventricular geometry, in-treatment systolic blood pressure, and randomized study treatment. No impact on aortic valve replacement was found. In conclusion, among patients with initial asymptomatic mild-to-moderate aortic stenosis, hypertension was associated with more abnormal left ventricular structure and increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.