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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Impact of chronic graft-versus-host disease on late relapse and survival on 7489 patients after myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for leukemia.
Clin. Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 10-29-2014
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Purpose: Malignancy relapse remains a major obstacle for successful allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is associated with fewer relapses. However, when studying effects of cGVHD on relapse it is difficult to separate from acute GVHD effects as most cases of cGVHD occur within the first year post-transplant at the time when acute GVHD is still active. Experimental design: The current study based on CIBMTR registry data investigated cGVHD and its association with the incidence of late relapse and survival in 7489 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) who were leukemia-free at12 months after myeloablative allogeneic HCT. Results: Forty-seven percent of the study population was diagnosed with cGVHD at 12 months after transplant. The protective effect of cGVHD on relapse was present only in patients with CML (RR: 0.47, 95% CI: 0.37-0.59, P <0.0001). cGVHD was significantly associated with higher risk of treatment related mortality, (RR: 2.43, 95% CI: 2.09-2.82, P <0.0001) and inferior overall survival (RR: 1.56, 95% CI: 1.41-1.73, P <0.0001) for all diseases. In patients with CML all organ sites and presentation types of cGVHD were equally associated with lower risk of late relapse. Conclusions: These results indicate that clinically relevant anti-leukemia effects of cGVHD on late relapses are present only in CML but not in AML, ALL or MDS. Chronic GVHD in patients who are one year survivors after myeloablative allogeneic HCT is primarily associated with higher TRM and inferior survival.
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An exploratory analysis of mitochondrial haplotypes and allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) outcomes.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 09-02-2014
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Certain mitochondrial haplotypes (mthaps) are associated with disease, possibly through differences in oxidative phosphorylation and/or immunosurveillance. We explored whether mthaps are associated with allogeneic HCT outcomes. Recipient (n=437) and donor (n=327) DNA was genotyped for common European mthaps (H, J, U, T, Z, K, V, X, I, W, K2). HCT outcomes for mthap matched siblings (n=198), all recipients, and all donors were modeled using relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals and compared to mthap H, the most common. Siblings with I and V were significantly more likely to die within 5 years (RR=3.0;1.2-7.9 and 4.6;1.8-12.3, respectively). W siblings experienced higher aGVHD II-IV events (RR=2.1;1.1-2.4) with no events for K or K2. Similar results were observed for all recipients combined, although J recipients experienced lower GVHD and higher relapse. Patients with I donors had a 2.7 fold (1.2-6.2) increased risk of death in five years, while few patients with K2 or W donors died. No patients with K2 donors and few patients with U donors relapsed. Mthap may be an important consideration in HCT outcomes, although validation and functional studies are needed. If confirmed, it may be feasible to select donors based on mthap to increase positive or decrease negative outcomes.
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Phase III clinical trial steroids/mycophenolate mofetil vs steroids/placebo as therapy for acute graft-versus-host disease: BMT CTN 0802.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 08-28-2014
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Corticosteroids are the accepted primary therapy for acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), but durable responses are seen in only about half the patients. BMT-CTN 0802, a phase III multi-center randomized double blinded trial, was designed to test whether mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) plus corticosteroids was superior to corticosteroids alone as initial therapy for acute GvHD. Patients with newly diagnosed acute GvHD were eligible if required systemic therapy. Patients were randomized to receive prednisone with either MMF or placebo. The primary endpoint was acute or chronic GvHD-free survival at day 56 after initiation of therapy. A futility rule for GvHD free survival at day 56 was met at a planned interim analysis after 235 eligible patients (out of 372) were enrolled: 116 to MMF, 119 to placebo. Baseline characteristics were well balanced between treatment groups including grade and organ distribution of GvHD. GvHD free survival at day 56, cumulative incidence of chronic GvHD at 12 months, overall survival, EBV reactivation, cumulative incidence of severe, life threatening infections, cumulative incidence of relapse at 12 months, quality of severe infections were similar. The addition of MMF to corticosteroids as initial therapy of acute GvHD does not improve GvHD-free survival compared with treatment with corticosteroids alone. The study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT01002742.
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Association of severity of organ involvement with mortality and recurrent malignancy in patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease.
Haematologica
PUBLISHED: 07-04-2014
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The National Institutes of Health global score for chronic graft-versus-host disease was devised by experts but was not based on empirical data. We hypothesized that analysis of prospectively collected data would enable derivation of a more accurate model for estimating mortality risk. We analyzed 574 adult patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease enrolled in a multicenter, observational study, using multivariate time-varying analysis accounting for serial changes in severity of involvement of eight individual organ sites over time. In the training set, severity of skin, mouth, gastrointestinal tract, liver and lung involvement were independently associated with the risk of non-relapse mortality. Weighted mortality points were assigned to individual organs based on the hazard ratios and were summed. The population was divided into three risk groups based on the total mortality points. The three new risk groups were validated in an independent validation set, but did not show better discriminative performance than the National Institutes of Health global score. As compared to a moderate or mild global score, a severe global score was associated with increased risks of non-relapse and overall mortality across time but not with a decreased risk of recurrent malignancy. The National Institutes of Health global score predicts patients' mortality risk throughout the course of their chronic graft-versus-host disease. Further research is required in order to improve outcomes in patients with severe chronic graft-versus-host disease, since their risk of mortality remains elevated.
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Core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia: Heterogeneity, monitoring, and therapy.
Am. J. Hematol.
PUBLISHED: 06-23-2014
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Core binding factor acute myelogenous leukemia (CBF AML) constitutes 15% of adult AML and carries an overall good prognosis. CBF AML encodes two recurrent cytogentic abnormalities referred to as t(8;21) and inv (16). The two CBF AML entities are usually grouped together but there is a considerable clinical, pathologic and molecular heterogeneity within this group of diseases. Recent and ongoing studies are addressing the molecular heterogeneity, minimal residual disease and targeted therapies to improve the outcome of CBF AML. In this article, we present a comprehensive review about CBF AML with emphasis on molecular heterogeneity and new therapeutic options. Am. J. Hematol. 89:1121-1131, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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Acute graft-versus-host disease: a bench-to-bedside update.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 06-09-2014
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Over the past 5 years, many novel approaches to early diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) have been translated from the bench to the bedside. In this review, we highlight recent discoveries in the context of current aGVHD care. The most significant innovations that have already reached the clinic are prophylaxis strategies based upon a refinement of our understanding of key sensors, effectors, suppressors of the immune alloreactive response, and the resultant tissue damage from the aGVHD inflammatory cascade. In the near future, aGVHD prevention and treatment will likely involve multiple modalities, including small molecules regulating immunologic checkpoints, enhancement of suppressor cytokines and cellular subsets, modulation of the microbiota, graft manipulation, and other donor-based prophylaxis strategies. Despite long-term efforts, major challenges in treatment of established aGVHD still remain. Resolution of inflammation and facilitation of rapid immune reconstitution in those with only a limited response to corticosteroids is a research arena that remains rife with opportunity and urgent clinical need.
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Assessment of joint and fascia manifestations in chronic graft-versus-host disease.
PUBLISHED: 04-24-2014
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To investigate the usefulness of various scales for evaluating joint and fascia manifestations in patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation, and to compare the scales in terms of simplicity of use and ability to yield reliable and clinically meaningful results.
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Donor killer cell Ig-like receptor B haplotypes, recipient HLA-C1, and HLA-C mismatch enhance the clinical benefit of unrelated transplantation for acute myelogenous leukemia.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 04-18-2014
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Killer cell Ig-like receptors (KIRs) interact with HLA class I ligands to regulate NK cell development and function. These interactions affect the outcome of unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We have shown previously that donors with KIR B versus KIR A haplotypes improve the clinical outcome for patients with acute myelogenous leukemia by reducing the incidence of leukemic relapse and improving leukemia-free survival (LFS). Both centromeric and telomeric KIR B genes contribute to the effect, but the centromeric genes are dominant. They include the genes encoding inhibitory KIRs that are specific for the C1 and C2 epitopes of HLA-C. We used an expanded cohort of 1532 T cell-replete transplants to examine the interaction between donor KIR B genes and recipient class I HLA KIR ligands. The relapse protection associated with donor KIR B is enhanced in recipients who have one or two C1-bearing HLA-C allotypes, compared with C2 homozygous recipients, with no effect due to donor HLA. The protective interaction between donors with two or more, versus none or one, KIR B motifs and recipient C1 was specific to transplants with class I mismatch at HLA-C (RR of leukemia-free survival, 0.57 [0.40-0.79]; p = 0.001) irrespective of the KIR ligand mismatch status of the transplant. The survival advantage and relapse protection in C1/x recipients compared with C2/C2 recipients was similar irrespective of the particular donor KIR B genes. Understanding the interactions between donor KIR and recipient HLA class I can be used to inform donor selection to improve outcome of unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation for acute myelogenous leukemia.
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Validation and refinement of the Disease Risk Index for allogeneic stem cell transplantation.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 04-17-2014
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Because the outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is predominantly influenced by disease type and status, it is essential to be able to stratify patients undergoing HCT by disease risk. The Disease Risk Index (DRI) was developed for this purpose. In this study, we analyzed 13,131 patients reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research who underwent HCT between 2008 and 2010. The DRI stratified patients into 4 groups with 2-year overall survival (OS) ranging from 64% to 24% and was the strongest prognostic factor, regardless of age, conditioning intensity, graft source, or donor type. A randomly selected training subgroup of 9849 patients was used to refine the DRI, using a multivariable regression model for OS. This refined DRI had improved prediction ability for the remaining 3282 patients compared with the original DRI or other existing schemes. This validated and refined DRI can be used as a 4- or 3-group index, depending on the size of the cohort under study, for prognostication; to facilitate the interpretation of single-center, multicenter, or registry studies; to adjust center outcome data; and to stratify patients entering clinical trials that enroll patients across disease categories.
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Clearance of acute myeloid leukemia by haploidentical natural killer cells is improved using IL-2 diphtheria toxin fusion protein.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 04-09-2014
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Haploidentical natural killer (NK) cell infusions can induce remissions in some patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) but regulatory T-cell (Treg) suppression may reduce efficacy. We treated 57 refractory AML patients with lymphodepleting cyclophosphamide and fludarabine followed by NK cell infusion and interleukin (IL)-2 administration. In 42 patients, donor NK cell expansion was detected in 10%, whereas in 15 patients receiving host Treg depletion with the IL-2-diphtheria fusion protein (IL2DT), the rate was 27%, with a median absolute count of 1000 NK cells/?L blood. IL2DT was associated with improved complete remission rates at day 28 (53% vs 21%; P = .02) and disease-free survival at 6 months (33% vs 5%; P < .01). In the IL2DT cohort, NK cell expansion correlated with higher postchemotherapy serum IL-15 levels (P = .002), effective peripheral blood Treg depletion (<5%) at day 7 (P < .01), and decreased IL-35 levels at day 14 (P = .02). In vitro assays demonstrated that Tregs cocultured with NK cells inhibit their proliferation by competition for IL-2 but not for IL-15. Together with our clinical observations, this supports the need to optimize the in vivo cytokine milieu where adoptively transferred NK cells compete with other lymphocytes to improve clinical efficacy in patients with refractory AML. This study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov, identifiers: NCT00274846 and NCT01106950.
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Autologous is superior to allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for acute promyelocytic leukemia in second complete remission.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 03-24-2014
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To identify favored choice of transplantation in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in second complete remission, we studied 294 patients with APL in second complete remission (CR2) receiving allogeneic (n = 232) or autologous (n = 62) hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplantation Research (CIBMTR) from 1995 to 2006, including 155 with pre-HCT PML/RAR? status (49% of allogeneic and 66% of autologous). Patient characteristics and transplantation characteristics, including treatment-related mortality, overall survival (OS), and disease-free survival, were collected and analyzed for both univariate and multivariate outcomes. With median follow-up of 115 (allogeneic) and 72 months (autologous), 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) favored autologous with 63% (49% to 75%), compared with allogeneic at 50% (44% to 57%) (P = .10). OS was 75% (63% to 85%) versus 54% (48% to 61%) (P = .002), for autologous and allogeneic transplantation, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed significantly worse DFS after allogeneic HCT (hazard ratio [HR], 1.88; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16 to 3.06; P = .011) and age > 40 years (HR, 2.30; 95% CI, 1.44 to 3.67; P = .0005). OS was significantly worse after allogeneic HCT (HR, 2.66; 95% CI, 1.52 to 4.65; P= .0006); age > 40 (HR, 3.29; 95% CI, 1.95 to 5.54; P < .001), and first complete remission < 12 months (HR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.07 to 2.26; P = .021). Positive pre-HCT PML-RAR? status in 17 of 114 allogeneic and 6 of 41 receiving autologous transplantation did not influence relapse, treatment failure, or survival in either group. The survival advantage for autografting was attributable to increased treatment-related mortality (TRM) in the allogeneic group of 30% compared to 2% in the autologous group, in addition to the added mortality associated with GVHD. We conclude that autologous HCT yields superior OS for APL in CR2. Long-term DFS in autologous recipients, even with minimal residual disease-positive grafts, remains an important subject for further study.
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CD16xCD33 bispecific killer cell engager (BiKE) activates NK cells against primary MDS and MDSC CD33+ targets.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 03-20-2014
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Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are stem cell disorders that can progress to acute myeloid leukemia. Although hematopoietic cell transplantation can be curative, additional therapies are needed for a disease that disproportionally afflicts the elderly. We tested the ability of a CD16xCD33 BiKE to induce natural killer (NK) cell function in 67 MDS patients. Compared with age-matched normal controls, CD7(+) lymphocytes, NK cells, and CD16 expression were markedly decreased in MDS patients. Despite this, reverse antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays showed potent degranulation and cytokine production when resting MDS-NK cells were triggered with an agonistic CD16 monoclonal antibody. Blood and marrow MDS-NK cells treated with bispecific killer cell engager (BiKE) significantly enhanced degranulation and tumor necrosis factor-? and interferon-? production against HL-60 and endogenous CD33(+) MDS targets. MDS patients had a significantly increased proportion of immunosuppressive CD33(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) that negatively correlated with MDS lymphocyte populations and CD16 loss on NK cells. Treatment with the CD16xCD33 BiKE successfully reversed MDSC immunosuppression of NK cells and induced MDSC target cell lysis. Lastly, the BiKE induced optimal MDS-NK cell function irrespective of disease stage. Our data suggest that the CD16xCD33 BiKE functions against both CD33(+) MDS and MDSC targets and may be therapeutically beneficial for MDS patients.
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Impact of age on quality of life, functional status, and survival in patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 02-17-2014
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Although older patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) may experience higher morbidity, the impact of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) on quality of life (QOL) and survival outcomes for older compared with younger patients is currently unknown. We utilized data of patients with moderate or severe chronic GVHD (N = 522, 1661 follow-up visits, a total of 2183 visits) from the Chronic GVHD Consortium, a prospective observational multicenter cohort. We examined the relationship between age group (adolescent and young adult, "AYA," 18 to 40 years; "middle-aged," 41 to 59 years; and "older," ? 60 years) and QOL (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Bone Marrow Transplantation [FACT-BMT]), physical functioning (Human Activity Profile [HAP]), functional status (2-minute walk test [2MWT]), nonrelapse mortality, and overall survival. Because of multiple testing, P values < .01 were considered significant. This study included 115 (22%) AYA, 279 (53%) middle-aged, and 128 (25%) older patients with moderate (58%) or severe (42%) chronic GVHD. Despite more physical limitations in older patients as measured by worse functional status (shorter 2MWT [P < .001] and lower HAP scores [P < .001]) relative to AYA and middle-aged patients, older patients reported better QOL (FACT-BMT, P = .004) compared with middle-aged patients and similar to AYA patients (P = .99). Nonrelapse mortality and overall survival were similar between the age groups. Therefore, despite higher physical and functional limitations, older patients who are selected to undergo HSCT and survive long enough to develop moderate or severe chronic GVHD have preserved QOL and similar overall survival and nonrelapse mortality when compared with younger patients. Therefore, we did not find evidence that older age is associated with worse outcomes in patients with moderate or severe chronic GVHD.
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Allotransplantation for patients age ?40 years with non-Hodgkin lymphoma: encouraging progression-free survival.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 01-30-2014
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Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) disproportionately affects older patients, who do not often undergo allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We analyzed Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research data on 1248 patients age ?40 years receiving reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) or nonmyeloablative (NMA) conditioning HCT for aggressive (n = 668) or indolent (n = 580) NHL. Aggressive lymphoma was more frequent in the oldest cohort 49% for age 40 to 54 versus 57% for age 55 to 64 versus 67% for age ?65; P = .0008). Fewer patients aged ?65 had previous autografting (26% versus 24% versus 9%; P = .002). Rates of relapse, acute and chronic GVHD, and nonrelapse mortality (NRM) at 1 year post-HCT were similar in the 3 age cohorts (22% [95% confidence interval (CI), 19% to 26%] for age 40 to 54, 27% [95% CI, 23% to 31%] for age 55 to 64, and 34% [95% CI, 24% to 44%] for age ?65. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) at 3 years was slightly lower in the older cohorts (OS: 54% [95% CI, 50% to 58%] for age 40 to 54; 40% [95% CI, 36% to 44%] for age 55 to 64, and 39% [95% CI, 28% to 50%] for age ?65; P < .0001). Multivariate analysis revealed no significant effect of age on the incidence of acute or chronic GVHD or relapse. Age ?55 years, Karnofsky Performance Status <80, and HLA mismatch adversely affected NRM, PFS, and OS. Disease status at HCT, but not histological subtype, was associated with worse NRM, relapse, PFS, and OS. Even for patients age ?55 years, OS still approached 40% at 3 years, suggesting that HCT affects long-term remission and remains underused in qualified older patients with NHL.
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Alternative donor transplantation for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission: a center for international blood and marrow transplant research-eurocord analysis.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2014
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We studied patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) over age 50 and in first complete remission (CR1) after adult unrelated donor (URD) (n = 441, 8/8 HLA matched; n = 94, 7/8 HLA matched) or umbilical cord blood (UCB; n = 205) transplantations. UCB recipients achieved CR1 within 8 weeks less often, and received reduced-intensity conditioning and cyclosporine-based graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis more often. Neutrophil recovery was slower in UCB (69% by day 28) compared with 8/8 HLA-matched URD (97%) and 7/8 HLA-matched (91%) (P < .001) recipients. Three-year transplantation-related mortality (TRM) was higher and leukemia-free survival (LFS) lower with UCB (35% and 28%, respectively) versus 8/8 HLA-matched URD (27% and 39%, respectively). TRM was higher in 7/8 HLA-matched URD (41%, P = .01), but LFS was similar at 34% (P = .39). Three-year chronic GVHD was the lowest in UCB (28%) versus 53% and 59% in 8/8 and 7/8 HLA-matched URD recipients, respectively. Three-year survival was 43% in 8/8 HLA-matched URD (95% confidence interval [CI], 38% to 48%), 30% in UCB (95% CI, 23% to 37%) (P = .002) and 37% in 7/8 URD (95% CI, 27 to 46). Allotransplantation for AML in CR1 with any of these grafts extends LFS for over one third of older patients. In the absence of an 8/8 HLA-matched URD or when transplantation is needed urgently, UCB can provide extended survival. Less frequent chronic GVHD with UCB transplantation may be of particular value for older patients.
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Lenalidomide maintenance for high-risk multiple myeloma after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2014
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Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) with reduced-intensity conditioning is an appealing option for patients with high-risk multiple myeloma (MM). However, progression after alloHCT remains a challenge. Maintenance therapy after alloHCT may offer additional disease control and allow time for a graft-versus-myeloma effect. The primary objective of this clinical trial was to determine the tolerability and safety profile of maintenance lenalidomide (LEN) given on days 1 to 21 of 28 days cycles, with intrapatient dose escalation during 12 months/cycles after alloHCT. Thirty alloHCT recipients (median age, 54 years) with high-risk MM were enrolled at 8 centers between 2009 and 2012. The median time from alloHCT to LEN initiation was 96 days (range, 66 to 171 days). Eleven patients (37%) completed maintenance and 10 mg daily was the most commonly delivered dose (44%). Most common reasons for discontinuation were acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) (37%) and disease progression (37%). Cumulative incidence of grades III to IV acute GVHD from time of initiation of LEN was 17%. Outcomes at 18 months after initiation of maintenance were MM progression, 28%; transplantation-related mortality, 11%; and progression-free and overall survival, 63% and 78%, respectively. The use of LEN after alloHCT is feasible at lower doses, although it is associated with a 38% incidence of acute GVHD. Survival outcomes observed in this high-risk MM population warrant further study of this approach.
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Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor: enbrel (etanercept) for the treatment of idiopathic pneumonia syndrome after allogeneic stem cell transplantation: blood and marrow transplant clinical trials network protocol.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 01-02-2014
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Idiopathic pneumonia syndrome (IPS) is a diffuse, noninfectious lung injury that occurs acutely after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). IPS-related mortality has been historically high (>50%) despite treatment with systemic corticosteroids and supportive care measures. We have now examined the role of tumor necrosis factor inhibition in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of corticosteroids with etanercept or placebo. Thirty-four subjects (?18 years) with IPS after HCT were randomized to receive methylprednisolone (2 mg/kg/day) plus etanercept (0.4 mg/kg twice weekly × 4 weeks; n = 16) or placebo (n = 18). No active infections and a pathogen-negative bronchoscopy were required at study entry. Response (alive, with complete discontinuation of supplemental oxygen support) and overall survival were examined. This study, originally planned to accrue 120 patients, was terminated prematurely due to slow accrual. In the limited number of patients examined, there were no differences in response rates at day 28 of study. Ten of 16 patients (62.5% [95% confidence interval {CI}, 35.4% to 84.8%]) receiving etanercept and 12 of 18 patients (66.7% [95% CI, 41.0% to 86.7%]) receiving placebo met the day 28 response definition (P = 1.00). The median survival was 170 days (95% CI, 11 to 362) with etanercept versus 64 days (95% CI, 26 to 209) with placebo (P = .51). Among responders, the median time to discontinuation of supplemental oxygen was 9 days (etanercept) versus 7 days (placebo). Therapy was well tolerated, with 1 toxicity-related death from infectious pneumonia in the placebo arm. The treatment of IPS with corticosteroids in adult HCT recipients was associated with high early response rates (>60%) compared with historical reports, with poor overall survival. The addition of etanercept did not lead to further increases in response, although the sample size of this truncated trial preclude a definitive conclusion.
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Which donor or graft source should you choose for the strongest GVL? Is there really any difference.
Best Pract Res Clin Haematol
PUBLISHED: 10-15-2013
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Patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) face relapse of their malignancy as the most frequent cause of treatment failure. It has been postulated that the allogeneic neoplastic potency of different donor or graft sources may differ and in some situations, a particular graft source might be preferred. Data on this supposition has been reviewed here to consider HLA-matched siblings, HLA-matched or partially matched unrelated donors (URD), unrelated umbilical cord blood (UCB), and haploidentical as well as blood or marrow grafts.
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Better leukemia-free and overall survival in AML in first remission following cyclophosphamide in combination with busulfan compared with TBI.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 09-24-2013
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Cyclophosphamide combined with total body irradiation (Cy/TBI) or busulfan (BuCy) are the most widely used myeloablative conditioning regimens for allotransplants. Recent data regarding their comparative effectiveness are lacking. We analyzed data from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research for 1230 subjects receiving a first hematopoietic cell transplant from a human leukocyte antigen-matched sibling or from an unrelated donor during the years 2000 to 2006 for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR) after conditioning with Cy/TBI or oral or intravenous (IV) BuCy. Multivariate analysis showed significantly less nonrelapse mortality (relative risk [RR] = 0.58; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.39-0.86; P = .007), and relapse after, but not before, 1 year posttransplant (RR = 0.23; 95% CI: 0.08-0.65; P = .006), and better leukemia-free survival (RR = 0.70; 95% CI: 0.55-0.88; P = .003) and survival (RR = 0.68; 95% CI: 0.52-0.88; P = .003) in persons receiving IV, but not oral, Bu compared with TBI. In combination with Cy, IV Bu is associated with superior outcomes compared with TBI in patients with AML in first CR.
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Pulmonary Symptoms Measured by the National Institutes of Health Lung Score Predict Overall Survival, Nonrelapse Mortality, and Patient-Reported Outcomes In Chronic Graft-Versus-Host Disease.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 09-07-2013
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The 2005 National Institutes of Health (NIH) Consensus Conference recommended assessment of lung function in patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) by both pulmonary function tests (PFTs) and assessment of pulmonary symptoms. We tested whether pulmonary measures were associated with nonrelapse mortality (NRM), overall survival (OS), and patient-reported outcomes (PRO). Clinician and patient-reported data were collected serially in a prospective, multicenter, observational study. Available PFT data were abstracted. Cox regression models were fit for outcomes using a time-varying covariate model for lung function measures and adjusting for patient and transplantation characteristics and nonlung chronic GVHD severity. A total of 1591 visits (496 patients) were used in this analysis. The NIH symptom-based lung score was associated with NRM (P = .02), OS (P = .02), patient-reported symptoms (P < .001) and functional status (P < .001). Worsening of NIH symptom-based lung score over time was associated with higher NRM and lower survival. All other measures were not associated with OS or NRM; although, some were associated with patient-reported lung symptoms. In conclusion, the NIH symptom-based lung symptom score of 0 to 3 is associated with NRM, OS, and PRO measures in patients with chronic GVHD. Worsening of the NIH symptom-based lung score was associated with increased mortality.
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Effect of Postremission Therapy before Reduced-Intensity Conditioning Allogeneic Transplantation for Acute Myeloid Leukemia in First Complete Remission.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 08-19-2013
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The impact of pretransplant (hematopoietic cell transplantation [HCT]) cytarabine consolidation therapy on post-HCT outcomes has yet to be evaluated after reduced-intensity or nonmyeloablative conditioning. We analyzed 604 adults with acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission (CR1) reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research who received a reduced-intensity or nonmyeloablative conditioning HCT from an HLA-identical sibling, HLA-matched unrelated donor, or umbilical cord blood donor from 2000 to 2010. We compared transplant outcomes based on exposure to cytarabine postremission consolidation. Three-year survival rates were 36% (95% confidence interval [CI], 29% to 43%) in the no consolidation arm and 42% (95% CI, 37% to 47%) in the cytarabine consolidation arm (P = .16). Disease-free survival was 34% (95% CI, 27% to 41%) and 41% (95% CI, 35% to 46%; P = .15), respectively. Three-year cumulative incidences of relapse were 37% (95% CI, 30% to 44%) and 38% (95% CI, 33% to 43%), respectively (P = .80). Multivariate regression confirmed no effect of consolidation on relapse, disease-free survival, and survival. Before reduced-intensity or nonmyeloablative conditioning HCT, these data suggest pre-HCT consolidation cytarabine does not significantly alter outcomes and support prompt transition to transplant as soon as morphologic CR1 is attained. If HCT is delayed while identifying a donor, our data suggest that consolidation does not increase transplant treatment-related mortality and is reasonable if required.
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Providing personalized prognostic information for adult leukemia survivors.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 06-28-2013
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Prediction of subsequent leukemia-free survival (LFS) and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in adults with acute leukemia who survived at least 1 year after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation is difficult. We analyzed 3339 patients with acute myeloid leukemia and 1434 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who received myeloablative conditioning and related or unrelated stem cells from 1990 to 2005. Most clinical factors predictive of LFS in 1-year survivors were no longer significant after 2 or more years. For acute myeloid leukemia, only disease status (beyond first complete remission) remained a significant adverse risk factor for LFS 2 or more years after transplantation. For lymphoblastic leukemia, only extensive chronic GVHD remained a significant adverse predictor of LFS in the second and subsequent years. For patients surviving for 1 year without disease relapse or extensive chronic GVHD, the risk of developing extensive chronic GVHD in the next year was 4% if no risk factors were present and higher if noncyclosporine-based GVHD prophylaxis, an HLA-mismatched donor, or peripheral blood stem cells were used. Estimates for subsequent LFS and extensive chronic GVHD can be derived for individual patients or populations using an online calculator (http://www.cibmtr.org/LeukemiaCalculators). This prognostic information is more relevant for survivors than estimates provided before transplantation.
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Role of reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation in older patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndromes: an international collaborative decision analysis.
J. Clin. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 06-24-2013
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Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal hematopoietic disorders that are more common in patients aged ? 60 years and are incurable with conventional therapies. Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation is potentially curative but has additional mortality risk. We evaluated RIC transplantation versus nontransplantation therapies in older patients with MDS stratified by International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) risk.
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Complement fragment 3a priming of umbilical cord blood progenitors: safety profile.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 06-19-2013
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Preclinical data showed that priming CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells with complement fragment 3a (C3a) improved homing and engraftment. Thus, we hypothesized that priming of umbilical cord blood (UCB) hematopoietic progenitors with C3a would facilitate homing and could potentially be used to address the need for improved engraftment after UCB transplantation. We primed 1 of 2 UCB units for double UCB transplantation after nonmyeloablative conditioning. This design provided adequate safety and the potential to observe skewed long-term chimerism in favor of the C3a-primed unit as a surrogate measure of efficacy. C3a priming of 1 UCB unit did not result in infusional toxicity. Increased grades 1 to 3 hypertension were the only infusional adverse events observed in 9 (30%) patients. We observed no activation of inflammatory or coagulation pathways downstream of C3a. As tested, C3a priming did not impair engraftment, but did not skew chimerism toward the treated unit. As compared with historical controls, mortality and survival were not adversely affected. Thus, before any additional clinical studies, C3a priming to promote engraftment will require further preclinical optimization.
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Importance of Donor Ethnicity/Race Matching in Unrelated Adult and Cord Blood Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.
Leuk. Lymphoma
PUBLISHED: 06-12-2013
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Donor race matching (both recipients and donors belonging to the same race) might be a factor in outcomes of donor allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT). A total of 858 patients who underwent umbilical cord blood (UCB) (475 patients: 202 double UCB and 273 single UCB) or unrelated donor (URD) (383 patients) alloHCT between January 1995 to December 2010 were studied. Most patients were Caucasian (87%), followed by Asians (4%), African Americans (3%), Hispanics (3%), mixed race (3%), and American Indians (<1%). Caucasians comprised 88% of the donor grafts; Caucasians are the most common race of the donor grafts for all races except for Asians. As a result, donor race matching was significantly higher in Caucasian recipients than ethnic minorities (95% vs. 47%, p<0.01). Donor race matching did not affect non-relapse mortality, relapse, acute or chronic graft-versus-host disease or overall survival. Acknowledging the limitations of this study (mainly, self-reported race information and small number of ethnic minorities), at present, there is no data supporting that donor race should be considered a factor in donor selection.
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Targeting natural killer cells to acute myeloid leukemia in vitro with a CD16 x 33 bispecific killer cell engager and ADAM17 inhibition.
Clin. Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 05-20-2013
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The graft versus leukemia effect by natural killer (NK) cells prevents relapse following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We determined whether a novel bispecific killer cell engager (BiKE) signaling through CD16 and targeting CD33 could activate NK cells at high potency against acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) targets.
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Peripheral dose heterogeneity due to the thread effect in total marrow irradiation with helical tomotherapy.
Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
PUBLISHED: 05-13-2013
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To report potential dose heterogeneity leading to underdosing at different skeletal sites in total marrow irradiation (TMI) with helical tomotherapy due to the thread effect and provide possible solutions to reduce this effect.
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Unrelated donor allogeneic transplantation after failure of autologous transplantation for acute myelogenous leukemia: a study from the center for international blood and marrow transplantation research.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 04-21-2013
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The survival of patients with relapsed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto-HCT) is very poor. We studied the outcomes of 302 patients who underwent secondary allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) from an unrelated donor (URD) using either myeloablative (n = 242) or reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC; n = 60) regimens reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplantation Research. After a median follow-up of 58 months (range, 2 to 160 months), the probability of treatment-related mortality was 44% (95% confidence interval [CI], 38%-50%) at 1-year. The 5-year incidence of relapse was 32% (95% CI, 27%-38%), and that of overall survival was 22% (95% CI, 18%-27%). Multivariate analysis revealed a significantly better overal survival with RIC regimens (hazard ratio [HR], 0.51; 95% CI, 0.35-0.75; P <.001), with Karnofsky Performance Status score ?90% (HR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.47-0.82: P = .001) and in cytomegalovirus-negative recipients (HR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.44-0.94; P = .022). A longer interval (>18 months) from auto-HCT to URD allo-HCT was associated with significantly lower riak of relapse (HR, 0.19; 95% CI, 0.09-0.38; P <.001) and improved leukemia-free survival (HR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.34-0.84; P = .006). URD allo-HCT after auto-HCT relapse resulted in 20% long-term leukemia-free survival, with the best results seen in patients with a longer interval to secondary URD transplantation, with a Karnofsky Performance Status score ?90%, in complete remission, and using an RIC regimen. Further efforts to reduce treatment-related mortaility and relapse are still needed.
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Similar overall survival using sibling, unrelated donor, and cord blood grafts after reduced-intensity conditioning for older patients with acute myelogenous leukemia.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 03-21-2013
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For older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) provides the best chance of long-term survival. A formal comparison between matched sibling (SIB), unrelated donor (URD), or umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation has not yet been reported in this setting. We compared reduced-intensity conditioning HCT in 197 consecutive patients 50 years and older with AML in complete remission from SIB (n = 82), URD (n = 35), or UCB (n = 80) transplantation. The 3-year cumulative incidences of transplantation-related mortality were 18%, 14%, and 24% with SIB, URD, and UCB transplantation, respectively (P = .22). The 3-year leukemia-free survival rates were 48%, 57%, and 33% with SIB, URD, and UCB transplantation, respectively (P = .009). In multivariate analysis, poor-risk cytogenetics was associated with relapse (hazard ratio, 1.7 [95% confidence interval, 1.0 to 3.0]; P = .04) and worse leukemia-free survival (hazard ratio, 1.6 [95% confidence interval, 1.0 to 2.5]; P = .03), whereas donor choice had no significant impact on overall survival (P = .73). Adjusted 3-year overall survival rates were 55% with SIB, 45% with URD, and 43% with UCB transplantation (P = .26). Until prospective studies are completed, this study supports the recommendation to consider SIB donor, URD, or UCB for HCT for older patients with AML in complete remission.
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Hand grip strength and 2-minute walk test in chronic graft-versus-host disease assessment: analysis from the Chronic GVHD Consortium.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 03-07-2013
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Hand grip strength (HGS) and the 2-minute walk test (2MWT) have been proposed as elements of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) assessment in clinical trials. Using all available data (n = 584 enrollment visits, 1689 follow-up visits, total of 2273 visits) from a prospective observational cohort study, we explored the relationship between HGS and 2MWT and patient-reported measures (Lee symptom scale, MOS 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey [SF-36], and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy [FACT]-Bone Marrow Transplantation quality of life instruments and Human Activity Profile [HAP]), chronic GVHD global severity (National Institutes of Health global score, clinician global score, and patient-reported global score), calculated and clinician-reported chronic GVHD response, and mortality (overall survival, nonrelapse mortality, and failure-free survival) in multivariable analyses adjusted for significant covariates. 2MWT was significantly associated with intuitive domains of the Lee Symptom Scale (overall, skin, lung, energy), SF-36 domain and summary scores, FACT summary and domain scores, and HAP scores (all P < .001). Fewer associations were detected with the HGS. The 2MWT and HGS both had significant association with global chronic GVHD severity. In multivariable analysis, 2MWT was significantly associated with overall survival, nonrelapse mortality, and failure-free survival, whereas no association was found for HGS. 2MWT and HGS were not sensitive to National Institutes of Health or clinician-reported response. Based on independent association with mortality, these data support the importance of the 2MWT for identification of high-risk chronic GVHD patients. However, change in 2MWT is not sensitive to chronic GVHD response, limiting its usefulness in clinical trials.
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Burden of morbidity in 10+ year survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation: report from the bone marrow transplantation survivor study.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 02-13-2013
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Long-term morbidity after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is unknown. The risk of physical and psychological health in 324 patients who had survived 10 or more years after HCT and a sibling comparison group (n = 309) was evaluated. Using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, the 15-year cumulative incidence of severe/life-threatening/fatal conditions was 41% (95% confidence interval, 34% to 48%). HCT survivors were 5.7 times as likely to develop a severe/life-threatening condition (P < .001) and 2.7 times as likely to report somatic distress (P < .001) compared with siblings. Compared with allogeneic HCT recipients with no chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), those with active chronic GVHD were at a 1.8-fold higher risk of severe/life-threatening health conditions (P = .006) and a 4.5-fold higher risk of somatic distress (P = .04); allogeneic HCT recipients with resolved chronic GVHD were not at increased risk of morbidity compared with those with no chronic GVHD. Only 27% of the HCT survivors returned to the transplantation center for their cancer-related care. The burden of long-term physical and emotional morbidity borne by survivors remains substantial, even beyond 10 years after HCT; however, specialized health care is underused. Patients, families, and healthcare providers need to be made aware of the high burden, so they can plan for post-HCT care, even many years after HCT.
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Cytomegalovirus reactivation after allogeneic transplantation promotes a lasting increase in educated NKG2C+ natural killer cells with potent function.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 12-16-2011
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During mouse cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, a population of Ly49H(+) natural killer (NK) cells expands and is responsible for disease clearance through the induction of a "memory NK-cell response." Whether similar events occur in human CMV infection is unknown. In the present study, we characterized the kinetics of the NK-cell response to CMV reactivation in human recipients after hematopoietic cell transplantation. During acute infection, NKG2C(+) NK cells expanded and were potent producers of IFN?. NKG2C(+) NK cells predominately expressed killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor, and self-killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors were required for robust IFN? production. During the first year after transplantation, CMV reactivation induced a more mature phenotype characterized by an increase in CD56(dim) NK cells. Strikingly, increased frequencies of NKG2C(+) NK cells persisted and continued to increase in recipients who reactivated CMV, whereas these cells remained at low frequency in recipients without CMV reactivation. Persisting NKG2C(+) NK cells lacked NKG2A, expressed CD158b, preferentially acquired CD57, and were potent producers of IFN? during the first year after transplantation. Recipients who reactivated CMV also expressed higher amounts of IFN?, T-bet, and IL-15R? mRNA transcripts. Our findings support the emerging concept that CMV-induced innate memory-cell populations may contribute to malignant disease relapse protection and infectious disease control long after transplantation.
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Transplants for leukemia in relapse: when is the best time?
Best Pract Res Clin Haematol
PUBLISHED: 11-04-2011
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Transplantation of hematopoietic cells to treat acute leukemia can offer disease control and extended survival for a sizeable fraction of patients, but because alternative approaches may also be effective, the decision about transplant timing remains uncertain. For those transplanted in first complete remission (CR1), outcomes are the best, but some fraction of those might have had extended leukemia-free survival in the absence of a transplant. In later remission, outcomes are variable but promising-and markedly better than any nontransplant approach. Risks of relapse may differ based on the depth of remission, measurable minimal residual disease (MRD), or patients performance status.
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Overlap subtype of chronic graft-versus-host disease is associated with an adverse prognosis, functional impairment, and inferior patient-reported outcomes: a Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease Consortium study.
Haematologica
PUBLISHED: 11-04-2011
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The National Institutes of Health Consensus Conference proposed the term "overlap" graft-versus-host disease to describe the situation when both acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease are present.
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Risk factors for acute GVHD and survival after hematopoietic cell transplantation.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 10-18-2011
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Risk factors for acute GVHD (AGVHD), overall survival, and transplant-related mortality were evaluated in adults receiving allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplants (1999-2005) from HLA-identical sibling donors (SDs; n = 3191) or unrelated donors (URDs; n = 2370) and reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research, Minneapolis, MN. To understand the impact of transplant regimen on AGVHD risk, 6 treatment categories were evaluated: (1) myeloablative conditioning (MA) with total body irradiation (TBI) + PBSCs, (2) MA + TBI + BM, (3) MA + nonTBI + PBSCs, (4) MA + nonTBI + BM, (5) reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) + PBSCs, and (6) RIC + BM. The cumulative incidences of grades B-D AGVHD were 39% (95% confidence interval [CI], 37%-41%) in the SD cohort and 59% (95% CI, 57%-61%) in the URD cohort. Patients receiving SD transplants with MA + nonTBI + BM and RIC + PBSCs had significantly lower risks of grades B-D AGVHD than patients in other treatment categories. Those receiving URD transplants with MA + TBI + BM, MA + nonTBI + BM, RIC + BM, or RIC + PBSCs had lower risks of grades B-D AGVHD than those in other treatment categories. The 5-year probabilities of survival were 46% (95% CI, 44%-49%) with SD transplants and 33% (95% CI, 31%-35%) with URD transplants. Conditioning intensity, TBI and graft source have a combined effect on risk of AGVHD that must be considered in deciding on a treatment strategy for individual patients.
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T cell-depleted partial matched unrelated donor transplant for advanced myeloid malignancy: KIR ligand mismatch and outcome.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 10-04-2011
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To evaluate the applicability of high-dose conditioning, CD34 selection, and enhanced natural killer (NK) cell alloreactivity reported as promising after haploidentical transplantation, we tested the same strategy for patients with advanced/high-risk myeloid leukemia lacking either related or well-matched unrelated donors (URD). In a prospective multicenter clinical trial using pretransplantation conditioning of thiotepa (5 mg/kg/day × 2), fludarabine (40 mg/mg/M(2)/day × 5), and total body radiation (800 cGy) plus thymoglobulin (2.5 mg/kg/day × 2), as well as a CD34 selected filgrastim stimulated peripheral blood graft from a partial matched URD, we treated 24 patients. The patients (median age 40 [range: 22-61]) were mismatched at 1-3 of 10 HLA loci with their donors; all were mismatched at HLA-C. Thirty-seven percent were ethnic or racial minorities. Twenty-one of 24 engrafted promptly with 1 primary graft failure and 2 early deaths. The cumulative incidence of grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) (34%, 95% confidence interval [CI], 14-54%), chronic GVHD (20%, 95% CI, 2%-38%), and relapse (26%, 95% CI, 8%-84%) were unaffected by KIR ligand donor:recipient mismatch (n = 5) versus KIR ligand match (n = 19). Only 3 (12%) had grade III-IV GVHD. Nonrelapse occurred in 17% (95% CI, 30%-31%) by 100 days and in 35% (95% CI, 15%-55%) by 1 year. Two-year survival and leukemia-free survival were each 40% (95% CI, 21%-59%) and was similar in KIR ligand matched or mismatched patients. Infections, mostly in the first 2 months, were frequent, and were the cause of death in 5 patients (35% of deaths). T cell recovery and NK cell proliferation and functional maturation were not altered by KIR ligand match or mismatch status. For these high-risk patients, this high intensity regimen and T depleted approach yielded satisfactory outcomes, but logistical difficulties in arranging URD grafts for patients with high-risk, unstable leukemia limited accrual. Improvements in peritransplantation disease control and additional measures to augment the allogeneic graft-versus-leukemia effect are still required.
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Autologous haemopoietic stem-cell transplantation followed by allogeneic or autologous haemopoietic stem-cell transplantation in patients with multiple myeloma (BMT CTN 0102): a phase 3 biological assignment trial.
Lancet Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 09-29-2011
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Autologous haemopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) improves survival in patients with multiple myeloma, but disease progression remains an issue. Allogeneic HSCT might reduce disease progression, but can be associated with high treatment-related mortality. Thus, we aimed to assess effectiveness of allogeneic HSCT with non-myeloablative conditioning after autologous HSCT compared with tandem autologous HSCT.
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Allogeneic stem cell transplantation in first complete remission.
Curr. Opin. Hematol.
PUBLISHED: 09-14-2011
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The optimal postremission therapy of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1) is uncertain. This review summarizes the recent developments in the clinical research and therapeutic applications defining the role of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT) in CR1.
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Regulatory T cells in acute myelogenous leukemia: is it time for immunomodulation?
Blood
PUBLISHED: 08-31-2011
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The microenviroment of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is suppressive for immune effector cells. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been recognized as a contributor factor and may be recruited and exploited by leukemic cells to evade immunesurveillance. Studies have shown that the frequencies of marrow and blood Tregs are greater in patients with AML than in control patients. Although increased Tregs have been associated with a decreased risk of GVHD after allogeneic HCT and hence may impede the graft-versus-tumor effect, recent findings indicate that that this may not be the case. Because there is a need to improve outcomes of standard treatment (chemotherapy with or without allogeneic HCT) in AML, targeting Tregs present an outstanding opportunity in AML because discoveries may apply throughout its treatment. Here, we review data on the roles of Tregs in mediating immune system-AML interactions. We focused on in vitro, animal, and observational human studies of Tregs in AML biology, development, prognosis, and therapy in different settings (eg, vaccination and HCT). Manipulation of Tregs or other types of immunomodulation may become a part of AML treatment in the future.
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Risk factors associated with increased nonrelapse mortality and with poor overall survival in children with chronic graft-versus-host disease.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 08-30-2011
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There is a paucity of information regarding the factors that affect nonrelapse mortality (NRM) and overall survival among children that develop chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD). We performed multivariate analyses using data from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research to identify risk factors for NRM and survival in 1117 pediatric subjects with leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome, transplanted from related donors, unrelated donors (URD), or unrelated cord blood between 1995 and 2004. We identified 4 variables associated with higher NRM: HLA partially matched or mismatched URD, peripheral blood cell graft, Karnofsky/Lansky score < 80 at cGVHD diagnosis, and platelets < 100 × 10(9)/L at cGVHD diagnosis. Factors associated with significantly worse survival were: age > 10 years, transplantation from HLA partially matched or mismatched URD, advanced disease at transplantation, Karnofsky/Lansky < 80; and platelets < 100 × 10(9)/L. Cumulative incidence of discontinuation of systemic immune suppression at 1, 3, and 5 years after diagnosis of cGVHD were 22% (20%-25%), 34% (31%-37%), and 37% (34%-40%), respectively. This is the largest study elucidating variables affecting outcome after diagnosis of cGVHD in pediatric allograft recipients. These variables may be useful for risk stratification, development of future clinical trials, and family counseling in children with cGVHD.
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Successful remission rates and survival after lymphodepleting chemotherapy and donor lymphocyte infusion for relapsed hematologic malignancies postallogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 08-23-2011
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Few therapeutic strategies exist for hematologic malignancies relapsing post allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. We present outcomes on 35 patients with nonchronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) hematologic malignancies, the majority having acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndromes/myeloproliferative disorders (MDS/MPD) (n = 22) receiving lymphodepleting chemotherapy followed by donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) at 2 T cell dose levels (0.5 and 1.0 × 10(8) CD3/kg). Forty-nine percent of patients achieved complete remission (CR), with a median duration of remission of 6 months (range: 2-71+). CR rates were similar between the 2 groups. The incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) of any grade was 49%. We saw a higher incidence of grade II-IV aGVHD, with a rate of 66% using the higher-dose DLI (grade III, 33% and grade 4, 20%) versus only 25% (10% grade III-IV) with the lower-dose DLI (P = .06). Overall survival at 1 and 2 years was 30% (95% confidence interval [CI], 16%-45%) and 19% (95% CI, 8%-34%); however, for those achieving CR, 1- and 2-year survival was improved at 44% (95% CI, 20%-66%) and 28% (95% CI, 8%-52%) (P = .03), respectively. These results demonstrate that DLI after lymphodepleting chemotherapy for relapsed hematologic malignancies results in frequent CRs. The lower DLI dose regimen improved the tolerability of this therapeutic approach, with modest rates of severe aGVHD.
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The National Marrow Donor Programs Symposium on Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in 2020: a health care resource and infrastructure assessment.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 08-19-2011
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Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the only known curative therapy for many patients with life-threatening hematologic and oncologic diseases. It is estimated that the National Marrow Donor Program(®) (NMDP) will facilitate 10,000 transplants by 2015, double the current number. To better understand the existing personnel and center infrastructure for HCT in the country and to address system capacity challenges to the future growth of HCT, the NMDP convened a diverse group of stakeholders and thought leaders representing HCT physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, pharmacists, other healthcare providers, HCT program directors, hospital administrators, payors, and professional organizations. Working groups were formed to identify: capacity issues because of shortages in human resources, structural constraints, and patient access barriers including diversity and healthcare disparity challenges; recommendations to address challenges; and stakeholders to engage. This report details the deliberations and recommendations of a national symposium, "Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in 2020: A Health Care Resource and Infrastructure Assessment," held in September 2010.
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Adverse psychological outcomes in long-term survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation: a report from the Bone Marrow Transplant Survivor Study (BMTSS).
Blood
PUBLISHED: 08-05-2011
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Little information exists regarding long-term psychological health of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) survivors. Using resources offered by the Bone Marrow Transplant Survivor Study (BMTSS), we evaluated adverse psychological outcomes in 1065 long-term HCT survivors and a healthy comparison group composed of siblings. Psychological health status was evaluated using the Brief Symptom Inventory-18. Twenty-two percent of the HCT survivors reported adverse psychological outcomes, compared with 8% of the siblings. Exposure to prednisone was associated with psychological distress across all domains (anxiety, depression, and somatic distress). Fifteen percent of the HCT survivors reported somatic distress, representing an almost 3-fold higher risk comparing to siblings. Among survivors, in addition to low annual household income and self-reported poor health, having severe/life-threatening conditions and presence of active chronic GVHD were associated with a 2-fold increased risk for somatic distress. Seven percent of the HCT survivors expressed suicidal ideation; patients with higher scores on depression subscale were most vulnerable. This study demonstrates that somatic distress is the biggest challenge faced by survivors long after HCT. These results identify vulnerable subpopulations and provide patients, families, and healthcare providers with necessary information to plan for post-HCT needs many years after HCT.
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Global and organ-specific chronic graft-versus-host disease severity according to the 2005 NIH Consensus Criteria.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 07-26-2011
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In 2005, the National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Project on Criteria for Clinical Trials in Chronic GVHD proposed a new scoring system for individual organs and an algorithm for calculating global severity (mild, moderate, severe). The Chronic GVHD Consortium was established to test these new criteria. This report includes the first 298 adult patients enrolled at 5 centers of the Consortium. Patients were assessed every 3-6 months using standardized forms recommended by the Consensus Conference. At the time of study enrollment, global chronic GVHD severity was mild in 10% (n = 32), moderate in 59% (n = 175), and severe in 31% (n = 91). Skin, lung, or eye scores determined the global severity score in the majority of cases, with the other 5 organs determining 16% of the global severity scores. Conventional risk factors predictive for onset of chronic GVHD and nonrelapse mortality in people with chronic GVHD were not associated with NIH global severity scores. Global severity scores at enrollment were associated with nonrelapse mortality (P < .0001) and survival (P < .0001); 2-year overall survival was 62% (severe), 86% (moderate), and 97% (mild). Patients with mild chronic GVHD have a good prognosis, while patients with severe chronic GVHD have a poor prognosis. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as no. NCT00637689.
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NK cell education after allogeneic transplantation: dissociation between recovery of cytokine-producing and cytotoxic functions.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 07-14-2011
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Natural killer (NK) cells mediate GVL effects after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) by the production of inflammatory cytokines and by direct target lysis. The acquisition of both functions was presumed to be developmentally linked, but this linkage remained unstudied after allo-HCT. We tested the cytokine production and degranulation of reconstituting NK cells after adult unrelated donor or umbilical cord blood grafting. Recipients of T cell-depleted transplants, receiving no immune suppression, showed diminished NK cell degranulation. In contrast, degranulation was normal or increased after T-cell replete transplants given with immune suppression. Strikingly, target cell-induced IFN? production was markedly diminished in all transplant settings, especially with T cell-depleted or naive T cell-containing umbilical cord blood grafts, suggesting a role for T cells in NK education. Although degranulation was similar in the KIR(+) and KIR(-) populations that coexpressed NKG2A, target cell-induced IFN? production was limited to the subset of NK cells expressing KIR inhibited by self-ligands. Thus, cytokine production and cytotoxic function do not consistently coexist in NK cells reconstituting after allo-HCT. Exposure to IL-15 rapidly increased target-inducible IFN? production, indicative of IL-15s potential as a therapeutic tool to enhance NK cell function to protect against infection and relapse after allo-HCT.
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Impact of bone marrow hematogones on umbilical cord blood transplantation outcomes in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 07-01-2011
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Early after umbilical cord blood transplantation, patients show marked differences in bone marrow (BM) hematogone percentages. Little is known about whether these differences are clinically relevant. We hypothesized that early recovery of hematogones may be associated with improved transplantation outcomes. BM aspirates were assessed from 88 patients with acute myeloid leukemia by two independent reviewers at day 21 and 100 after umbilical cord blood transplantation. Interobserver variability for BM hematogone percentages at these time points showed correlation coefficients of 0.83 and 0.98, respectively (P ? .01 for both). A high percentage of hematogones at day 21 was associated with less acute graft-versus-host disease grade 3 to 4 (P = .01). At day 100, a high percentage of BM hematogones was associated with improved overall survival (P = .02) and lower treatment-related mortality (P ? .01). This study shows that BM hematogone percentages may be useful prognostic indicators in patients with acute myeloid leukemia after umbilical cord blood transplantation and should be routinely reported in BM differential counts.
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Effects of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor on chromosome aneuploidy and replication asynchrony in healthy peripheral blood stem cell donors.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 06-30-2011
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As peripheral blood has surpassed bone marrow as a predominant source of stem cells for transplantation, use of the cytokine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to mobilize peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) is increasing. Issues regarding potential genotoxic effects of even short-term, low-dose G-CSF treatment for the healthy donors have been raised. To address the question of chromosomal instability, we used FISH to evaluate the peripheral blood lymphocytes of 22 PBSC donors and 22 matched controls at 5 time points over a 12-month period. The specimens obtained were a pre-G-CSF, followed by collections at the time of PBSC harvest (days 5-7) and at 2, 6, and 12 months after donation. Eight additional PBSC donors provided a single sample at 12 months. Nine loci (mapped to chromosomes 7, 8, 9, 17, 21, and 22) were evaluated for aneuploidy, including 3 mapped to chromosome 7 because of the specific relevance of monosomy 7. Replication timing was evaluated for chromosome 15 and 17 loci. No evidence was found of G-CSF-induced chromosomal instability. This work supports the epidemiologic data that have demonstrated no increased risk for hematologic malignancies in G-CSF-primed PBSC donors.
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Sensitivity of changes in chronic graft-versus-host disease activity to changes in patient-reported quality of life: results from the Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease Consortium.
Haematologica
PUBLISHED: 06-17-2011
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The 2005 National Institute of Health Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease Consensus Conference recommended collection of patient-reported outcomes in clinical trials on chronic graft-versus-host disease. We assessed whether changes in chronic graft-versus-host disease severity, determined using National Institute of Health criteria, clinicians assessment or patients self-evaluation, correlated with patient-reported quality of life as measured by the Short Form-36 and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Bone Marrow Transplant (FACT-BMT) instruments.
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Validation of measurement scales in ocular graft-versus-host disease.
Ophthalmology
PUBLISHED: 06-02-2011
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To validate measurement scales for rating ocular chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Candidate scales were recommended for use in clinical trials by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Chronic GVHD Consensus Conference or have been previously validated in dry eye syndromes.
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Classifying cytogenetics in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia in complete remission undergoing allogeneic transplantation: a Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research study.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 05-26-2011
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Cytogenetics play a major role in determining the prognosis of patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). However, existing cytogenetics classifications were developed in chemotherapy-treated patients and might not be optimal for patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We studied 821 adult patients reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) who underwent HCT for AML in first or second complete remission between 1999 and 2004. We compared the ability of the 6 existing classifications to stratify patients by overall survival. We then defined a new scheme specifically applicable to patients undergoing HCT using this patient cohort. Under this scheme, inv(16) is favorable, a complex karyotype (4 or more abnormalities) is adverse, and all other classified abnormalities are intermediate in predicting survival after HCT (5-year overall survival, 64%, 18%, and 50%, respectively; P = .0001). This scheme stratifies patients into 3 groups with similar nonrelapse mortality, but significantly different incidences of relapse, overall and leukemia-free survival. It applies to patients regardless of disease status (first or second complete remission), donor type (matched related or unrelated), or conditioning intensity (myeloablative or reduced intensity). This transplantation-specific classification could be adopted for prognostication purposes and to stratify patients with AML and karyotypic abnormalities entering HCT clinical trials.
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The role of cytotoxic therapy with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in the treatment of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia: update of the 2006 evidence-based review.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 05-17-2011
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Clinical research published since the first evidence-based review on the role of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT) in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in adults is presented and critically evaluated in this update. Treatment recommendations changed or modified based on new evidence include: (1) myeloablative allogeneic SCT is an appropriate treatment for adult (<35 years) ALL in first complete remission for all disease risk groups; and (2) reduced-intensity conditioning may produce similar outcomes to myeloablative regimens. Treatment recommendations unchanged or strengthened by new evidence include: (1) allogeneic SCT is recommended over chemotherapy for ALL in second complete remission or greater; (2) allogeneic is superior to autologous SCT; and (3) there are similar survival outcomes after related and unrelated allogeneic SCT. New treatment recommendations based on new evidence include: (1) in the absence of a suitable allogeneic donor, autologous SCT may be an appropriate therapy, but results in a high relapse rate; (2) it is appropriate to consider cord blood transplantation for patients with no HLA well-matched donor; and (3) imatinib therapy before and/or after SCT (for Ph+ ALL) yields significantly superior survival outcomes. Areas of needed research in the treatment of adult ALL with SCT were identified and presented in the review.
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Chronic GVHD risk score: a Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research analysis.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 04-14-2011
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Several risk factors are associated with increased mortality in patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD), but there is considerable variability in the reported factors. Therefore, we evaluated patient, transplantation, and cGVHD characteristics to develop a risk score in 5343 patients with cGVHD. Ten variables were identified as being significant in multivariate analysis of overall survival and nonrelapse mortality (NRM): age, prior acute GVHD, time from transplantation to cGVHD, donor type, disease status at transplantation, GVHD prophylaxis, gender mismatch, serum bilirubin, Karnofsky score, and platelet count. These 10 variables were used to build a cGVHD risk score, and 6 risk groups (RGs) were identified. The 5-year NRM was 5% (1%-9%) in RG1, 20% (19%-23%) in RG2, 33% (29%-37%) in RG3, 43% (40%-46%) in RG4, 63% (53%-74%) in RG5, and 72% (59%-85%) in RG6. The 5-year overall survival was highest at 91% (95% confidence interval [CI]:85%-97%) in RG1, followed by 67% (65%-69%) in RG2, 51% (46%-55%) in RG3, 40% (37%-43%) in RG4, 21% (12%-30%) in RG5, and 4% (0%-9%) in RG6 (all P < .01). This analysis demonstrates the usefulness of data from a large registry to develop risk-score categories for major transplantation outcomes. Validation of this cGVHD risk score is needed in a different population to ensure its broad applicability.
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Extramedullary relapse of acute myelogenous leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: better prognosis than systemic relapse.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 04-12-2011
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Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HSCT) is considered a curative treatment for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Extramedullary relapse after HSCT for AML is a rare event and is less well defined than systemic, hematologic relapse. We retrospectively studied all patients with AML (n = 436) who underwent HSCT at the University of Minnesota between 1996 and 2008 who developed either a bone marrow (BM) or extramedullary (EM) relapse, and examined the incidence and risk factors for BM and EM relapse. Of 128 patients who relapsed post-HSCT, 25 had relapse in EM sites, either isolated (n = 13) or with concurrent BM relapse (n = 12). Relapse sites included bone (n = 1), central nervous system (n = 6), gastrointestinal (n = 4), lymphatic (n = 4), skin (n = 5), genitourinary (n = 1), pulmonary (n = 1), and soft tissue (n = 3). The time to relapse was longer in the EM sites (median, 328 days vs 168 days). Patients with EM relapse were more likely to have had preceding acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) (77% vs 49%; P = .03) or chronic GVHD (46% vs 15%; P = .02) compared with those with BM relapse. The 6-month survival postrelapse was significantly better in patients with isolated EM relapse (69%) compared with those with combined EM and BM relapse (8%) or those with BM relapse alone (27%) (P < .01). Compared with local therapy alone, systemic therapy yielded better 6-month survival in patients with EM relapse. This study suggests differing pathogenesis of BM relapse versus EM relapse of AML after allogeneic HSCT. GVHD and its accompanying graft-versus-leukemia effect may better protect BM sites, but patients with EM relapse have better responses to combined therapy and improved survival compared with those with BM relapse.
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Human herpesvirus 6 infection after hematopoietic cell transplantation: is routine surveillance necessary?
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 04-11-2011
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Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV6) may be an important pathogen following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We prospectively evaluated weekly HHV6 viremia testing after allogeneic HCT using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay. HHV-6 viremia was detected in 46 of 82 (56%) patients at a median of 23 days post-HCT (range: day +10 to +168). More males (65% vs females 39%, P = .03) and recipients of umbilical cord blood (UCB 69% vs unrelated donor [URD], 46% vs sibling donor [20%] grafts, P = 0.01) reactivated HHV-6. Patients with HHV6 viremia had more cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation (26% vs 5.5%, P = .01) and unexplained fever and rash (23.9% vs 2.7%, P = .01) compared with patients without HHV6 viremia. High-level HHV6 (? 25,000 copies/mL) versus lower levels were associated with more culture-negative pneumonitis (72.7% vs 22.8%, P = .01). Twenty HHV6-positive patients were treated with foscarnet, ganciclovir, or cidofovir for HHV6 or other coexistent viruses. Within 2 weeks, HHV6 viremia resolved more commonly in treated (65%) than untreated patients (31%), P = .02. Survival at 3 months was similar in treated and untreated patients (90% vs 81%, P = .4). Survival at 3 and 6 months post-HCT were not affected by HHV6 positivity (3 months HHV6+ 85% vs 78%, P = .46; 6 months HHV6+ 70% vs 72%, P = .89) or by HHV6 level (3-month high level 73% vs 89%, P = .23; 6-month high level 64% vs 71%, P = .54). Neither the occurrence of HHV6, degree of viremia, nor use of antiviral drugs influenced short-term survival after HCT.
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Late-onset noninfectious pulmonary complications in adult allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant recipients.
Transplantation
PUBLISHED: 03-16-2011
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Late-onset noninfectious pulmonary complications (LONIPCs) after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) contribute to posttransplant mortality, morbidity, and decreased quality of life. The effect of newer HCT approaches including reduced intensity and umbilical cord on the incidence and outcome of LONIPC has not been studied. We hereby present a study evaluating the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of LONIPC in a recent cohort of allogeneic HCT recipients.
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Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation overcomes the adverse prognostic impact of CD20 expression in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 03-14-2011
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CD20 expression is associated with early recurrence and inferior survival in precursor-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients treated with chemotherapy. Whether CD20 influences outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is unknown. We analyzed CD20 expression on blasts at diagnosis in 157 patients who underwent allo-HSCT in the first complete remission (57%) or the second complete remission (43%). Of 125 evaluable patients, 71 were ? 20 years of age. CD20 expression was observed in 58 patients (46%; 52% of children, 39% of adults). There was no association between age, Ph(+) status, white blood cell count at diagnosis, and CD20 positivity. After allo-HSCT, disease-free survival at 5 years was 48% for all patients, 55% (95% confidence interval 40%-67%) for CD20(+) patients, and 43% (95% confidence interval 30%-54%) for CD20(-) patients (P = .15). Relapse did not differ between the groups. These results can serve as a reference to evaluate incorporation of anti-CD20 therapeutics to HSCT for the CD20(+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia subset. Clinical trial numbers for www.clinicaltrials.gov are NCT00365287, NCT00305682, and NCT00303719.
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Comparison of reduced-intensity hematopoietic cell transplantation with chemotherapy in patients age 60-70 years with acute myelogenous leukemia in first remission.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 03-11-2011
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We compared the outcomes of patients age 60-70 years with acute myelogenous leukemia receiving reduced-intensity allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in first remission (CR1) reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Research (n = 94) with the outcomes in patients treated with induction and postremission chemotherapy on Cancer and Leukemia Group B protocols (n = 96). All patients included had been in CR1 for at least 4 months. The HCT recipients were slightly younger than the chemotherapy patients (median age, 63 years vs 65 years; P < .001), but there were no significant between-group differences in the proportion with therapy-related leukemia or in different cytogenetic risk groups. Time from diagnosis to CR1 was longer for the HCT recipients (median, 44 days vs 38 days; P = .031). Allogeneic HCT was associated with significantly lower risk of relapse (32% vs 81% at 3 years; P < .001), higher nonrelapse mortality (36% vs 4% at 3 years; P < .001), and longer leukemia-free survival (32% vs 15% at 3 years; P = .001). Although overall survival was longer for HCT recipients, the difference was not statistically significant (37% vs 25% at 3 years; P = .08). Our findings suggest that reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic HCT in patients age 60-70 with acute myelogenous leukemia in CR1 reduces relapse and improves leukemia-free survival. Strategies that reduce nonrelapse mortality may yield significant improvements in overall survival.
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Radiation injury treatment network (RITN): healthcare professionals preparing for a mass casualty radiological or nuclear incident.
Int. J. Radiat. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 02-28-2011
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To describe the history, composition, and activities of the Radiation Injury Treatment Network (RITN). The Radiation Injury Treatment Network® is a cooperative effort of the National Marrow Donor Program and the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. The goals of RITN are to educate hematologists, oncologists, and stem cell transplant practitioners about their potential involvement in the response to a radiation incident and provide treatment expertise. Injuries to the marrow system readily occur when a victim is exposed to ionising radiation. This focus therefore leverages the expertise of these specialists who are accustomed to providing the intensive supportive care required by patients with a suppressed marrow function. Following a radiological incident, RITN centres may be asked to: Accept patient transfers to their institutions; provide treatment expertise to practitioners caring for victims at other centres; travel to other centres to provide medical expertise; or provide data on victims treated at their centres. Moving forward, it is crucial that we develop a coordinated interdisciplinary approach in planning for and responding to radiological and nuclear incidents. The ongoing efforts of radiation biologists, radiation oncologists, and health physicists can and should complement the efforts of RITN and government agencies.
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Patient-reported quality of life is associated with severity of chronic graft-versus-host disease as measured by NIH criteria: report on baseline data from the Chronic GVHD Consortium.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2011
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Quality of life (QOL) after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is compromised by chronic GVHD. In a prospectively assembled multicenter cohort of adults with chronic GVHD (n = 298), we examined the relationship between chronic GVHD severity defined by National Institutes of Health (NIH) criteria and QOL as measured by the SF-36 and FACT-BMT instruments at time of enrollment. Chronic GVHD severity was independently associated with QOL, adjusting for age. Compared with population normative data, SF-36 scores were more than a SD (10 points) lower on average for the summary physical component score (PCS) and role-physical subscale, and significantly lower (with magnitude 4-10 points) for several other subscales. Patients with moderate and severe cGVHD had PCS scores comparable with scores reported for systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and multiple sclerosis, and greater impairment compared with common chronic conditions including diabetes, hypertension, and chronic lung disease. Moderate to severe cGVHD as defined by NIH criteria is associated with significant compromise in multiple QOL domains, with PCS scores in the range of other systemic autoimmune diseases. Compromised QOL provides a functional assessment of the effects of chronic GVHD, and may be measured in cGVHD clinical studies using either the SF-36 or the FACT-BMT.
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Effect of obesity on outcomes after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for multiple myeloma.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 02-16-2011
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Obesity has implications for chemotherapy dosing and selection of patients for therapy. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant (AutoHCT) improves outcomes for patients with multiple myeloma, but optimal chemotherapy dosing for obese patients is poorly defined. We analyzed the outcomes of 1087 recipients of AutoHCT for myeloma reported to the CIBMTR between 1995 and 2003 who received high-dose melphalan conditioning, with or without total body irradiation (TBI). We categorized patients by body mass index (BMI) as normal, overweight, obese, or severely obese. There was no overall effect of BMI on progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), progression, or nonrelapse mortality (NRM). In patients receiving melphalan and TBI conditioning, obese and severely obese patients had superior PFS and OS compared with normal and overweight patients, but the clinical significance of this finding is unclear. More obese patients were more likely to receive a reduced dose of melphalan, but there was no evidence that melphalan or TBI dosing variability affected PFS. Therefore, current common strategies of dosing melphalan do not impair outcomes for obese patients, and obesity should not exclude patients from consideration of autologous transplantation. Further research is necessary to optimize dosing of both chemotherapy and radiation in obese patients.
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Relapse of lymphoma after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation: management strategies and outcome.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 02-13-2011
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The outcome and management of relapsed lymphoma after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is difficult. Therapeutic options may include donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI), reduction of immunosuppression (RIS), chemotherapy, radiation, immunotherapy, second HCT, and experimental treatments, but reported data contrasting the response and efficacy of these salvage treatments are limited. We describe the treatments, response, prognosis, and long-term survival of 72 patients with relapse of lymphoma after allogeneic HCT. Between 1991 and 2007, 227 lymphoma patients underwent allogeneic HCT. Of these, 72 (32%) developed relapse/progression after their HCT at a median of 99 days (0-1898 days); 37 had early (<100 days) post-HCT relapse. Forty-four had non-Hodgkin lymphoma (7 mantle cell, 5 indolent, 15 diffuse large B cell, 4 Burkitts, and 13 T/Natural Killer cell), and 28 patients had Hodgkin lymphoma. At the time of HCT, 62 patients were in remission (22 in complete [CR] and 40 in partial [PR]), 1 had stable whereas 9 had progressive disease. Seventeen cases received myeloablative and 55 received a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen. At relapse, most patients had generalized lymphadenopathy, extranodal organ involvement, and advanced disease. Five patients received no intervention for the post-HCT relapse. Immunosuppressive treatment was reduced or withdrawn as the first-line therapy in 58 patients (80.5%); 47 were treated using combinations of conventional chemotherapy (n = 22), rituximab (n = 27), interferon (IFN) (n = 1), DLI (n = 7), second HCT (n = 2), local radiation (n = 23), and other therapy (n = 6). Thirty-eight patients had an objective response (CR in 30, PR in 8), and 2 had stable disease (SD). At the post-HCT relapse, favorable prognostic factors for survival after HCT included good ECOG performance status (0-2), normal lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), early stage disease (stage I-III), isolated extranodal organ involvement, and later relapse (>100 days) post-HCT. Three-year survival after HCT was significantly better in late than early relapse (53%; 95% confidence interval [CI] [34%-69%] versus 36%, [20%-52%], P = .02). Of 72 relapsed patients, 29 (40%) survived at a median of 34 (3-148) months posttransplant. The most common cause of death was underlying lymphoma (79%). The overall prognosis of relapsed/progressive lymphoma after allogeneic HCT is disappointing, yet half of patients respond to withdrawal of immunosuppression and additional therapies. Novel treatments can control lymphoma with acceptable morbidity. Particularly for patients with later relapse, ongoing treatment after relapse can yield meaningful benefit and prolonged survival.
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Pre-transplant consolidation chemotherapy may not improve outcomes after reduced intensity conditioning hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission.
Leuk. Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-12-2011
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The role consolidation chemotherapy prior to reduced-intensity (RIC) HCT is unclear. We reviewed 60 consecutive patients with AML in CR1 undergoing RIC HCT at the University of Minnesota and evaluated outcomes based on exposure to pre-transplant consolidation chemotherapy. The two year incidence of relapse and the probability of overall survival were similar between those who did and did not receive consolidation chemotherapy. The 2 year incidence of transplant-related mortality was slightly higher in those who did not receive consolidation and correlated with a higher HCT comorbidity index (HCT-CI) in that cohort. Our data suggest that exposure to consolidation chemotherapy prior to RIC HCT may not improve post-transplant outcomes for patients with AML in CR1.
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Review of stem-cell transplantation for myelodysplastic syndromes in older patients in the context of the Decision Memo for Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Myelodysplastic Syndrome emanating from the Centers for Medicare and Medicai
J. Clin. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 01-10-2011
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Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) comprise a heterogeneous group of clonal hematopoietic stem-cell disorders that result in varying degrees of cytopenia and risk of transformation into acute leukemia. Allogeneic stem-cell transplantation (SCT) is the only known cure for this disease. The treatment is routinely used for younger patients, but only a minority of patients older than the age of 60 undergo this procedure. The overall MDS incidence is 3.3 per 100,000, but the incidence in patients older than age 70 is between 15 and 50 per 100,000. The median age at presentation is 76 years. Medicare-age patients 65 or older represent 80% of the total population receiving an MDS diagnosis. In the United States, one of the obstacles to SCT for older patients with MDS has been lack of third party reimbursement. On August 4, 2010, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services released their Decision Memo for Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) for Myelodysplastic Syndrome. This memo states: "Allogeneic HSCT for MDS is covered by Medicare only for beneficiaries with MDS participating in an approved clinical study that meets the criteria below…. " In this review, we will summarize what is known regarding the role of allogeneic SCT in older patients as well as other elements that should be included within clinical trials that can provide the evidence necessary to demonstrate that allogeneic SCT should be a covered benefit for Medicare beneficiaries.
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National Cancer Institutes First International Workshop on the Biology, Prevention, and Treatment of Relapse after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: summary and recommendations from the organizing committee.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 01-09-2011
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The National Cancer Institutes First International Workshop on the Biology, Prevention, and Treatment of Relapse after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation was organized and convened to identify, prioritize, and coordinate future research activities related to relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Each of the Workshops 6 Working Committees has published individual reports of ongoing basic, translational, and clinical research and recommended areas for future research related to the areas of relapse biology, epidemiology, prevention, and treatment. This document summarizes each committees recommendations and suggests 3 major initiatives for a coordinated research effort to address the problem of relapse after allo-HSCT: (1) to establish multicenter correlative and clinical trial networks for basic/translational, epidemiologic, and clinical research; (2) to establish a network of biorepositories for the collection of samples before and after allo-HSCT to aid in laboratory and clinical studies; and (3) to further refine, implement, and study the Workshop-proposed definitions for disease-specific response and relapse and recommendations for monitoring of minimal residual disease. These recommendations, in coordination with ongoing research initiatives and transplantation organizations, provide a research framework to rapidly and efficiently address the significant problem of relapse after allo-HSCT.
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Effect of conditioning regimen intensity on acute myeloid leukemia outcomes after umbilical cord blood transplantation.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 01-05-2011
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Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation is increasingly used in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) for older and medically unfit patients. Data on the efficacy of HCT after RIC relative to myeloablative conditioning (MAC) are limited. We compared the outcomes of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients >18 yrs who received UCB grafts after either RIC or MAC. One hundred nineteen adult patients with AML in complete remission (CR) underwent an UCB transplant after RIC (n =74, 62%) or MAC (n = 45, 38%) between January 2001 and December 2009. Conditioning was either reduced intensity and consisted of cyclophosphamide 50 mg/kg, fludarabine 200 mg/m(2), and total-body irradiation (TBI) 200 cGy or myelablative and consisted for cyclophosphamide 120 mg/kg, fludarabine 75 mg/m(2), and TBI 1200-1320 cGy. All patients received cyclosporine (day -3 to day +180) and mycophenolate mofetil (day -3 to day +45) post-HCT immunosuppression and hematopoietic growth factor. Use of RIC was reserved for patients >45 years (n = 66, 89%) or preexisting severe comorbidities (n = 8, 11%). The 2 groups were similar except for preceding myelodysplastic syndrome (RIC = 28% versus MAC = 4%, P < .01) and age that was dictated by the treatment protocols (median, RIC = 55 years versus MAC = 33years; P < .01). The incidence of neutrophil recovery at day +42 was higher with RIC (94% versus MAC = 82%, P < .1), whereas platelet recovery at the sixth month was similar (RIC = 68% versus MAC = 67%, P = .30). Incidence of grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) (RIC = 47% versus MAC = 67%, P < .01) was decreased with similar incidence of chronic GVHD (cGVHD) (RIC = 30% versus MAC = 34%, P = .43). Median follow-up for survivors was 3.8 and 4.5 years for RIC and MAC, respectively (P = .4). Using RIC, 3-year leukemia-free survival (LFS) was decreased (31% versus MAC = 55%, P = .02) and 3-year relapse incidence was increased (43% versus MAC = 9%, P < .01). Two-year transplant-related mortality (TRM) was similar (RIC = 19% versus MAC = 27%; P = .55). In multivariate analysis, RIC recipients and those in CR2 with CR1 duration <1 year had higher risk of relapse and poorer LFS with no independent predictors of TRM. UCB with RIC extends the use of allogeneic HCT for older and frail patients without excessive TRM with greater benefit for patients in CR1 and CR2 with longer CR1.
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Outcome of patients with IgD and IgM multiple myeloma undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a retrospective CIBMTR study.
Clin Lymphoma Myeloma Leuk
PUBLISHED: 12-16-2010
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Immunoglobulin D (IgD) and IgM multiple myeloma represent uncommon immunoglobulin isotypes, accounting for 2% and 0.5% of cases, respectively. Limited information is available regarding the prognosis of these isotypes, but they have been considered to have a more aggressive course than the more common immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA isotypes. In particular, the outcome after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto-HCT) has not been well defined.
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Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for adults with acute myeloid leukemia: myths, controversies, and unknowns.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 11-22-2010
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Progress in the last decade has improved the understanding of leukemia biology. Molecular markers in combinations with cytogenetics have improved the risk stratification of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and informed decision-making. In parallel, several important advances in the transplant field, such as better supportive care, improved transplant technology, increased availability of alternative donors, and reduced-intensity conditioning have improved the safety as well as access of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for a larger number of patients. In this review, the positioning of HCT in the management of patients with AML is evaluated in view of changing risk/benefit ratios associated with both conventional treatments and transplantation, and some of the controversies are addressed in light of emerging data. Increasing data demonstrate outcomes of alternative donor transplantation approaching HLA-identical sibling donors in high-risk AML supporting the inclusion of alternative donors in trials of prospective studies evaluating post remission strategies for high-risk AML. The use of reduced-intensity conditioning has expanded the eligibility of HCT to older patients with AML, and outcome data are encouraging. Continued study of HCT versus alternative therapies is required to optimize patients outcomes in AML.
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How closely related is graft-vs-leukemia to donor/recipient disparity?
Best Pract Res Clin Haematol
PUBLISHED: 11-01-2010
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Graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) is an unwanted complication of stem cell transplant, but the graft-vs-leukemia (GVL) effect has been shown to positively affect outcomes. GVHD and GVL have similar but not identical alloreactivity, and GVL may be affected by the source of grafts, the preparative conditioning regimen, and donor genetic elements. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) mismatch does not appear to augment the GVL effect, and increased GVHD does not necessarily lead to decreased relapse.
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