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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Draft Genome Sequence of the Brazilian Toxic Bloom-Forming Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa Strain SPC777.
Genome Announc
PUBLISHED: 08-03-2013
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Microcystis aeruginosa strain SPC777 is an important toxin-producing cyanobacterium, isolated from a water bloom of the Billings reservoir (São Paulo State, Brazil). Here, we report the draft genome sequence and initial findings from a preliminary analysis of strain SPC777, including several gene clusters involved in nonribosomal and ribosomal synthesis of secondary metabolites.
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Natural Products from Cyanobacteria With Antimicrobial and Antitumor Activity.
Curr Pharm Biotechnol
PUBLISHED: 02-27-2013
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Cyanobacteria are an important source of structurally bioactive metabolites, with cytotoxic, antiviral, anticancer, antimitotic, antimicrobial, specific enzyme inhibition and immunosuppressive activities. This study focused on the antitumor and antimicrobial activities of intra and extracellular cyanobacterial extracts. A total of 411 cyanobacterial strains were screened for antimicrobial activity using a subset of pathogenic bacteria as target. The in vitro antitumor assays were performed with extracts of 24 strains tested against two murine cancer cell lines (colon carcinoma CT-26 and lung cancer 3LL). Intracellular extracts inhibited 49 and 35% of Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogenic bacterial growth, respectively. Furthermore, the methanolic intracellular extract of Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii CYP011K and Nostoc sp. CENA69 showed inhibitory activity against the cancer cell lines. The extracellular extract from Fischerella sp. CENA213 and M. aeruginosa NPJB-1 exhibited inhibitory activity against 3LL lung cancer cells at 0.8 ?g ml-1 and Oxynema sp. CENA135, Synechococcus sp. CENA154, M. aeruginosa NPJB-1 and M. aeruginosa NPLJ-4 presented inhibitory activity against CT26 colon cancer cells at 0.8 ?g ml-1. Other extracts were able to inhibit 3LL cell-growth at higher concentrations (20 ?g ml-1) such as Nostoc sp. CENA67, Synechococcus sp. CENA154 and M. aeruginosa NPLJ-4, while CT26 cells were inhibited at the same concentration by Nostoc sp. CENA67 and Fischerella sp. CENA213. These extracts presented very low inhibitory activity on human peripheral blood lymphocytes. The results showed that some cyanobacterial strains are a rich source of natural products with potential for pharmacological and biotechnological applications.
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Drivers of cyanobacterial diversity and community composition in mangrove soils in south-east Brazil.
Environ. Microbiol.
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Cyanobacteria act as primary producers of carbon and nitrogen in nutrient-poor ecosystems such as mangroves. This important group of microorganisms plays a critical role in sustaining the productivity of mangrove ecosystems, but the structure and function of cyanobacteria assemblages can be perturbed by anthropogenic influences. The aim of this work was to assess the community structure and ecological drivers that influence the cyanobacterial community harboured in two Brazilian mangrove soils, and examine the long-term effects of oil contamination on these keystone species. Community fingerprinting results showed that, although cyanobacterial communities are distinct between the two mangroves, the structure and diversity of the assemblages exhibit similar responses to environmental gradients. In each ecosystem, cyanobacteria occupying near-shore areas were similar in composition, indicating importance of marine influences for structuring the community. Analysis of 16S rRNA sequences revealed the presence of diverse cyanobacterial communities in mangrove sediments, with clear differences among mangrove habitats along a transect from shore to forest. While near-shore sites in both mangroves were mainly occupied by Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus genera, sequences retrieved from other mangrove niches were mainly affiliated with uncultured cyanobacterial 16S rRNA. The most intriguing finding was the large number of potentially novel cyanobacteria 16S rRNA sequences obtained from a previously oil-contaminated site. The abundance of cyanobacterial 16S rRNA sequences observed in sites with a history of oil contamination was significantly lower than in the unimpacted areas. This study emphasized the role of environmental drivers in determining the structure of cyanobacterial communities in mangrove soils, and suggests that anthropogenic impacts may also act as ecological filters that select cyanobacterial taxa. These results are an important contribution to our understanding of the composition and relative abundance of previously poorly described cyanobacterial assemblages in mangrove ecosystems.
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Cyanobacterial diversity in the phyllosphere of a mangrove forest.
FEMS Microbiol. Ecol.
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The cyanobacterial community colonizing phyllosphere in a well-preserved Brazilian mangrove ecosystem was assessed using cultivation-independent molecular approaches. Leaves of trees that occupy this environment (Rhizophora mangle,Avicennia schaueriana and Laguncularia racemosa) were collected along a transect beginning at the margin of the bay and extending upland. The results demonstrated that the phyllosphere of R. mangle and L. racemosa harbor similar assemblages of cyanobacteria at each point along the transect. A. schaueriana, found only in the coastal portions of the transect, was colonized by assemblages with lower richness than the other trees. However, the results indicated that spatial location was a stronger driver of cyanobacterial community composition than plant species. Distinct cyanobacterial communities were observed at each location along the coast-to-upland transect. Clone library analysis allowed identification of 19 genera of cyanobacteria and demonstrated the presence of several uncultivated taxa. A predominance of sequences affiliated with the orders Nostocales and Oscillatoriales was observed, with a remarkable number of sequences similar to genera Symphyonemopsis/Brasilonema (order Nostocales). The results demonstrated that phyllosphere cyanobacteria in this mangrove forest ecosystem are influenced by environmental conditions as the primary driver at the ecosystem scale, with tree species exerting some effect on community structure at the local scale.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.