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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Using a color-coded ambigraphic nucleic acid notation to visualize conserved palindromic motifs within and across genomes.
BMC Genomics
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2014
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Ambiscript is a graphically-designed nucleic acid notation that uses symbol symmetries to support sequence complementation, highlight biologically-relevant palindromes, and facilitate the analysis of consensus sequences. Although the original Ambiscript notation was designed to easily represent consensus sequences for multiple sequence alignments, the notation's black-on-white ambiguity characters are unable to reflect the statistical distribution of nucleotides found at each position. We now propose a color-augmented ambigraphic notation to encode the frequency of positional polymorphisms in these consensus sequences.
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Rapid countermeasure discovery against Francisella tularensis based on a metabolic network reconstruction.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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In the future, we may be faced with the need to provide treatment for an emergent biological threat against which existing vaccines and drugs have limited efficacy or availability. To prepare for this eventuality, our objective was to use a metabolic network-based approach to rapidly identify potential drug targets and prospectively screen and validate novel small-molecule antimicrobials. Our target organism was the fully virulent Francisella tularensis subspecies tularensis Schu S4 strain, a highly infectious intracellular pathogen that is the causative agent of tularemia and is classified as a category A biological agent by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. We proceeded with a staggered computational and experimental workflow that used a strain-specific metabolic network model, homology modeling and X-ray crystallography of protein targets, and ligand- and structure-based drug design. Selected compounds were subsequently filtered based on physiological-based pharmacokinetic modeling, and we selected a final set of 40 compounds for experimental validation of antimicrobial activity. We began screening these compounds in whole bacterial cell-based assays in biosafety level 3 facilities in the 20th week of the study and completed the screens within 12 weeks. Six compounds showed significant growth inhibition of F. tularensis, and we determined their respective minimum inhibitory concentrations and mammalian cell cytotoxicities. The most promising compound had a low molecular weight, was non-toxic, and abolished bacterial growth at 13 ┬ÁM, with putative activity against pantetheine-phosphate adenylyltransferase, an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of coenzyme A, encoded by gene coaD. The novel antimicrobial compounds identified in this study serve as starting points for lead optimization, animal testing, and drug development against tularemia. Our integrated in silico/in vitro approach had an overall 15% success rate in terms of active versus tested compounds over an elapsed time period of 32 weeks, from pathogen strain identification to selection and validation of novel antimicrobial compounds.
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CpG oligodeoxyribonucleotides protect mice from Burkholderia pseudomallei but not Francisella tularensis Schu S4 aerosols.
J Immune Based Ther Vaccines
PUBLISHED: 02-05-2010
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Studies have shown that CpG oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODN) protect mice from various bacterial pathogens, including Burkholderia pseudomallei and Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS), when administered before parenteral challenge. Given the potential to develop CpG ODN as a pre-treatment for multiple bacterial biological warfare agents, we examined survival, histopathology, and cytokine data from CpG ODN-treated C57BL/6 mice to determine whether previously-reported protection extended to aerosolized B. pseudomallei 1026b and highly virulent F. tularensis Schu S4 infections. We found that, although CpG ODN protected mice from aerosolized B. pseudomallei challenges, the immunostimulant failed to benefit the animals exposed to F. tularensis Schu S4 aerosols. Our results, which contrast with earlier F. tularensis LVS studies, highlight potential differences in Francisella species pathogenesis and underscore the need to evaluate immunotherapies against human pathogenic species.
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A novel brain heart infusion broth supports the study of common Francisella tularensis serotypes.
J. Microbiol. Methods
PUBLISHED: 11-30-2009
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Francisella tularensis Schu S4, LVS and U112 have become model organisms for the study of Francisella pathogenesis, and represent a cross section of the different F. tularensis subspecies. Both Schu S4 and LVS are fastidious organisms, requiring medium fortified with supplements and nutrients for enhanced growth. Chamberlains defined medium, Tryptone Soy Broth supplemented with cysteine (TSBc), and cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth (CAMHB) supplemented with 2% IsoVitaleX are typically used in the cultivation of these bacteria. In this report, we describe a simple brain heart infusion broth formulation that can be used to obtain superior growth characteristics in all of these model organisms, and can support bacterial growth from low inoculum. Surprisingly, CAMHB, which is favored in the literature for culturing Schu S4 and LVS, induced the worst growth characteristics of the four formulations studied. To expand on these observations, an additional seven strains of F. tularensis, representing types A.I, A.II, and B were selected from the Department of Defense United Culture Collection (UCC) and a comparative analysis of their growth characteristics performed in the four broth formulations. Results demonstrate differences in the growth characteristics of Francisella species that are significantly influenced by both strain type and the choice of growth medium. Though four of the five additional Type A strains displayed superior growth characteristics in Chamberlains defined medium, growth characteristics of all three model organisms, as well the Type B strains, were enhanced by the new BHI-based broth formulation. We conclude that this medium represents the optimal choice for cultivation of the three model organisms used for Francisella research.
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Exogenous Yersinia pestis quorum sensing molecules N-octanoyl-homoserine lactone and N-(3-oxooctanoyl)-homoserine lactone regulate the LcrV virulence factor.
Microb. Pathog.
PUBLISHED: 02-12-2009
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LcrV is a key Yersinia pestis antigen, immune regulator, and component of the type III secretion system (T3SS). Researchers have shown that N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) can down-regulate the expression of the LcrV homolog, PcrV, in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Using ELISA, western blot, DNA microarray analysis, and real time PCR we demonstrate that the addition of AHL molecules N-octanoyl-homoserine lactone (C8) or N-(3-oxooctanoyl)-homoserine lactone (oxo-C8) to Y. pestis cultures down-regulates LcrV protein expression. DNA microarray analysis shows 10 additional T3SS genes are consistently down-regulated by C8 or oxo-C8. This is the first report demonstrating that AHLs regulate Y. pestis virulence factor expression.
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Pressure cycling technology in systems biology.
Methods Mol. Biol.
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Systems biologists frequently seek to integrate complex data sets of diverse analytes into a comprehensive picture of an organisms biological state under defined environmental conditions. Although one would prefer to collect these data from the same sample, technical limitations with traditional sample preparation methods often commit the investigator to extracting one type of analyte at the expense of losing all others. Often, volume further constrains the range of experiments that can be collected from a single sample. The practical solution employed to date has been to rely on information collected from multiple replicate experiments and similar historical or reported data. While this approach has been popular, the integration of information collected from disparate single-analyte sample preparation streams increases uncertainty due to nonalignment during comparative analysis, and such gaps accumulate quickly when combining multiple data sets. Regrettably, discontinuities between separate data streams can confound a whole understanding of the biological system being investigated. This difficulty is further compounded for researchers handling highly pathogenic samples, in which it is often necessary to use harsh chemicals or high-energy sterilization procedures that damage the target analytes. Ultra-high pressure cycling technology (PCT), also known as barocycling, is an emerging sample preparation strategy that has distinct advantages for systems biology studies because it neither commits the researcher to pursuing a specific analyte nor leads to the degradation of target material. In fact, samples prepared under pressure cycling conditions have been shown to yield a more complete set of analytes due to uniform disruption of the sample matrix coupled with an advantageous high pressure solvent environment. Fortunately, PCT safely sterilizes and extracts complex or pathogenic viral, bacterial, and spore samples without adversely affecting the constituent biomolecules valued as informative and meaningful analytes. This chapter provides procedures and findings associated with incorporating PCT into systems biology as a new and enabling approach to preanalytical sample treatment.
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Biolog phenotype microarrays.
Methods Mol. Biol.
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Phenotype microarrays nicely complement traditional genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic analysis by offering opportunities for researchers to ground microbial systems analysis and modeling in a broad yet quantitative assessment of the organisms physiological response to different metabolites and environments. Biolog phenotype assays achieve this by coupling tetrazolium dyes with minimally defined nutrients to measure the impact of hundreds of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous, and sulfur sources on redox reactions that result from compound-induced effects on the electron transport chain. Over the years, we have used Biologs reproducible and highly sensitive assays to distinguish closely related bacterial isolates, to understand their metabolic differences, and to model their metabolic behavior using flux balance analysis. This chapter describes Biolog phenotype microarray system components, reagents, and methods, particularly as they apply to bacterial identification, characterization, and metabolic analysis.
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Disrupting the luxS quorum sensing gene does not significantly affect Bacillus anthracis virulence in mice or guinea pigs.
Virulence
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Many bacterial species use secreted quorum-sensing autoinducer molecules to regulate cell density- and growth phase-dependent gene expression, including virulence factor production, as sufficient environmental autoinducer concentrations are achieved. Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, contains a functional autoinducer (AI-2) system, which appears to regulate virulence gene expression. To determine if the AI-2 system is necessary for disease, we constructed a LuxS AI-2 synthase-deficient mutant in the virulent Ames strain of B. anthracis. We found that growth of the LuxS-deficient mutant was inhibited and sporulation was delayed when compared with the parental strain. However, spores of the Ames luxS mutant remained fully virulent in both mice and guinea pigs.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.