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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
ASPS-1, a novel cell line manifesting key features of alveolar soft part sarcoma.
J. Pediatr. Hematol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 05-10-2011
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In vitro growth of alveolar soft part sarcoma (ASPS) and establishment of an ASPS cell line, ASPS-1, are described in this study. Using a recently developed xenograft model of ASPS derived from a lymph node metastasis, organoid nests consisting of 15 to 25 ASPS cells were isolated from ASPS xenograft tumors by capture on 70 ?m filters and plated in vitro. After attachment to the substratum, these nests deposited small aggregates of ASPS cells. These cells grew slowly and were expanded over a period of 3 years and have maintained characteristics consistent with those of both the original ASPS tumor from the patient and the xenograft tumor including (1) presence of the alveolar soft part locus-transcription factor E3 type 1 fusion transcript and nuclear expression of the alveolar soft part locus-transcription factor E3 type 1 fusion protein; (2) maintenance of the t(X;17)(p11;q25) translocation characteristic of ASPS; and (3) expression of upregulated ASPS transcripts involved in angiogenesis (ANGPTL2, HIF-1-?, MDK, c-MET, VEGF, and TIMP-2), cell proliferation (PRL, PCSK1), metastasis (ADAM9), as well as the transcription factor BHLHB3 and the muscle-specific transcripts TRIM63 and ITG?1BP3. This ASPS cell line forms colonies in soft agar and retains the ability to produce highly vascularized ASPS tumors in NOD.SCID/NCr mice. Immunohistochemistry of selected ASPS markers on these tumors indicated similarity to those of the original patient tumor as well as to the xenografted ASPS tumor. We anticipate that this ASPS cell line will accelerate investigations into the biology of ASPS including identification of new therapeutic approaches for treatment of this slow growing soft tissue sarcoma.
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Therapeutic vulnerability of an in vivo model of alveolar soft part sarcoma (ASPS) to antiangiogenic therapy.
J. Pediatr. Hematol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 07-29-2009
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In vivo growth of alveolar soft part sarcoma (ASPS) was achieved using subcutaneous xenografts in sex-matched nonobese diabetic severe combined immunodeficiency mice. One tumor, currently at passage 6, has been maintained in vivo for 32 months and has maintained characteristics consistent with those of the original ASPS tumor including (1) tumor histology and staining with periodic acid Schiff/diastase, (2) the presence of the ASPL-TFE3 type 1 fusion transcript, (3) nuclear staining with antibodies to the ASPL-TFE3 type 1 fusion protein, (4) maintenance of the t(X;17)(p11;q25) translocation characteristic of ASPS, (5) stable expression of signature ASPS gene transcripts and finally, the development and maintenance of a functional vascular network, a hallmark of ASPS. The ASPS xenograft tumor vasculature encompassing nests of ASPS cells is highly reactive to antibodies against the endothelial antigen CD34 and is readily accessible to intravenously administered fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran. The therapeutic vulnerability of this tumor model to antiangiogenic therapy, targeting vascular endothelial growth factor and hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha, was examined using bevacizumab and topotecan alone and in combination. Together, the 2 drugs produced a 70% growth delay accompanied by a 0.7 net log cell kill that was superior to the antitumor effect produced by either drug alone. In summary, this study describes a preclinical in vivo model for ASPS which will facilitate investigation into the biology of this slow growing soft tissue sarcoma and demonstrates the feasibility of using an antiangiogenic approach in the treatment of ASPS.
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Gene expression profiling of alveolar soft-part sarcoma (ASPS).
BMC Cancer
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2009
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Alveolar soft-part sarcoma (ASPS) is an extremely rare, highly vascular soft tissue sarcoma affecting predominantly adolescents and young adults. In an attempt to gain insight into the pathobiology of this enigmatic tumor, we performed the first genome-wide gene expression profiling study.
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Bioinformatic analysis of patient-derived ASPS gene expressions and ASPL-TFE3 fusion transcript levels identify potential therapeutic targets.
PLoS ONE
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Gene expression data, collected from ASPS tumors of seven different patients and from one immortalized ASPS cell line (ASPS-1), was analyzed jointly with patient ASPL-TFE3 (t(X;17)(p11;q25)) fusion transcript data to identify disease-specific pathways and their component genes. Data analysis of the pooled patient and ASPS-1 gene expression data, using conventional clustering methods, revealed a relatively small set of pathways and genes characterizing the biology of ASPS. These results could be largely recapitulated using only the gene expression data collected from patient tumor samples. The concordance between expression measures derived from ASPS-1 and both pooled and individual patient tumor data provided a rationale for extending the analysis to include patient ASPL-TFE3 fusion transcript data. A novel linear model was exploited to link gene expressions to fusion transcript data and used to identify a small set of ASPS-specific pathways and their gene expression. Cellular pathways that appear aberrantly regulated in response to the t(X;17)(p11;q25) translocation include the cell cycle and cell adhesion. The identification of pathways and gene subsets characteristic of ASPS support current therapeutic strategies that target the FLT1 and MET, while also proposing additional targeting of genes found in pathways involved in the cell cycle (CHK1), cell adhesion (ARHGD1A), cell division (CDC6), control of meiosis (RAD51L3) and mitosis (BIRC5), and chemokine-related protein tyrosine kinase activity (CCL4).
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.