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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Is the Dodo bird endangered in the 21st century? A meta-analysis of treatment comparison studies.
Clin Psychol Rev
PUBLISHED: 02-26-2014
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The Dodo bird hypothesis asserts that when bona fide treatments are compared they yield similar outcomes and this hypothesis is consistent with a common factors or contextual model of psychotherapy. Wampold et al. (1997), the most recent comprehensive meta-analysis to test the Dodo bird hypothesis, yielded consistent evidence of treatment equivalence. However, some of Wampold et al.'s analytic strategies, such as using multiple effect sizes from the same study and prioritizing long-term follow-up, may have obscured treatment differences. The current meta-analysis updated Wampold et al. by analyzing studies published in the subsequent 16years (k=51). Separate effect sizes were calculated for primary outcomes versus secondary outcomes, at termination and follow-up. Contrary to the Dodo bird hypothesis, there was evidence of treatment differences for primary outcomes at termination. Furthermore, cognitive-behavioral treatments may be incrementally more effective than alternative treatments for primary outcomes. Consistent with the Dodo bird hypothesis, there was little evidence of treatment differences for the secondary outcomes at termination and follow-up. There are small, statistically significant differences between bona-fide treatments when the specific targets of those treatments are assessed, but not when secondary outcomes are assessed, providing mixed support for both specific factors and contextual models of psychotherapy.
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Array comparative genomic hybridization identifies a heterozygous deletion of the entire KCNJ2 gene as a cause of sudden cardiac death.
Circ Cardiovasc Genet
PUBLISHED: 01-06-2014
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Large gene rearrangements, not detectable by standard molecular genetic sequencing techniques, are present in a minority of patients with long QT syndrome. We aimed to screen for large rearrangements in genes responsible for long QT syndrome as part of the molecular autopsy of a 36-year-old woman who died suddenly and had a negative autopsy. A retrospective analysis of an ECG identified a long QT interval, but sequencing of known LQT genes was uninformative.
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Diagnostic genetics at a distance: von hippel-lindau disease and a novel mutation.
Genet Res Int
PUBLISHED: 03-31-2013
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Genetic testing at a distance is commonplace where members of a family with a segregating germline mutation are geographically separated. For the most part, this challenge is addressed through the intervention of health professionals in taking and/or processing blood samples for subsequent couriering of DNA to a referral laboratory. In some circumstances, however, the collecting of pivotal clinical material may involve direct patient involvement. We describe such a situation where noninvasive saliva samples were provided by members of a family manifesting Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease. The analysis identified a novel mutation in the VHL gene that was used to exclude other family members as being at risk of VHL disease.
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Managing risk: clinical decision-making in mental health services.
Issues Ment Health Nurs
PUBLISHED: 11-15-2011
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Risk assessment and management is a major component of contemporary mental health practice. Risk assessment in health care exists within contemporary perspectives of management and risk aversive practices in health care. This has led to much discussion about the best approach to assessing possible risks posed by people with mental health problems. In addition, researchers and commentators have expressed concern that clinical practice is being dominated by managerial models of risk management at the expense of meeting the patients health and social care needs. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the risk assessment practices of a multidisciplinary mental health service. Findings indicate that mental health professionals draw on both managerial and therapeutic approaches to risk management, integrating these approaches into their clinical practice. Rather than being dominated by managerial concerns regarding risk, the participants demonstrate professional autonomy and concern for the needs of their clients.
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Metabolic syndrome in children with and without developmental coordination disorder.
Res Dev Disabil
PUBLISHED: 05-07-2011
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Children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) have higher rates of obesity compared to children with typical motor development, and, as a result may be at increased risk for developing metabolic syndrome (MetS). The purpose of this study was to determine the presence of MetS and its components among children with and without DCD. This nested case-control study classified 63 children scoring below the 16th percentile on the Movement Assessment Battery for Children (M-ABC-2) as probable DCD (pDCD), and 63 controls, all of whom scored above the 16th percentile. Metabolic syndrome was defined using the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria. Eleven children met the criteria for MetS; 8 (72.3%) with pDCD and 3 (27.3%) controls (p = 0.115). Abdominal obesity was found in 39 (30.9%) of children, 29 (46.0%) with pDCD and 10 (15.9%) controls (p < 0.01). Serum triglycerides were higher in pDCD compared to controls, 91.9 mg/dl (63.1) vs. 67.7 mg/dl (33.3) in the control group, p = 0.001. Blood pressure was also significantly higher in the pDCD group, mean systolic BP (110 vs. 105 mmHg, p = 0.01) and mean diastolic BP (69 vs. 65 mmHg, p = 0.01). There were no statistically significant differences between the groups for other components of MetS. The higher prevalence of abdominal obesity and elevated triglycerides and blood pressure in children with pDCD may put them at risk of meeting all criteria of MetS earlier then their peers.
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Audit of emergency department assessment and management of patients presenting with community-acquired needle stick injuries.
Aust Health Rev
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2011
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To describe characteristics and management of people with community acquired needle stick injuries (CANSI) attending urban emergency departments; and suggest a guideline to improve assessment, management, and documentation.
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Relocating care: negotiating nursing skillmix in a mental health unit for older adults.
Nurs Inq
PUBLISHED: 02-02-2011
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Mental health care in Australia in the last 20 years has moved from stand-alone psychiatric hospitals to general hospitals and the community. This paper reports an action research project exploring the experiences of nurses on an acute mental health unit for older adults staffed with a skillmix of mental health and general nurses, which recently transitioned from a psychiatric to a general hospital. The new service provides comprehensive health care, including the management of physical co-morbidity and a recovery orientation. Recovery acknowledges the role and rights of consumers and carers in planning and management of care, choice and individual strengths (Shepherd). The new ward received additional resources to establish the model of care, including a broader skillmix. The paper explores the dynamics of development of a new model of care and of bringing together staff with different professional orientations, cultures and priorities. Focus groups and interviews were conducted with 18 staff. Analysis resulted in three themes relating to the impact of competing goals and foci of care upon professional boundaries; competing organisational cultures and the impact of service change upon work practices. The findings are explored in relation to ideas about health care delivery associated with neoliberalism.
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Semantic contributions to immediate serial recall: evidence from two contrasting aphasic individuals.
Neurocase
PUBLISHED: 06-14-2010
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This paper examines the effect of semantic variables on serial recall in two contrasting aphasic cases and a group of controls. Experiment 1 manipulates word imageability and Experiment 2 manipulates semantic similarity. Controls not only showed better recall of imageable/semantically grouped lists, but under some conditions they also produced proportionately fewer phonological errors. These findings suggest that increasing the effectiveness of lexical/semantic support reduces reliance on phonological support. Consistent with this proposal, case TV, whose phonological impairment should increase his reliance on lexical/semantic support, produced abnormally low rates of phonological errors under some conditions. Conversely, case NP, who had a lexical/semantic impairment, produced abnormally high rates of phonological errors under some conditions. Analysis of serial recall curves in both aphasics and controls support the hypothesis that phonological processes are particularly critical for the recall of list-final items. However, there was no evidence that semantic support is especially crucial for list-initial recall. Controls did not exhibit stronger effects of semantic variables at list-initial position. Case NP (lexical/semantic impairment) performed disproportionately poorly on these items, but only under certain conditions.
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HTS-Compatible Patient-Derived Cell-Based Assay to Identify Small Molecule Modulators of Aberrant Splicing in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1.
Curr Chem Genomics
PUBLISHED: 03-19-2010
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Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a genetic disorder characterized by muscle wasting, myotonia, cataracts, cardiac arrhythmia, hyperinsulinism and intellectual deficits, and is caused by expansion of a CTG repeat in the 3UTR of the Dystrophia Myotonica-Protein Kinase (DMPK) gene. The DMPK transcripts containing expanded CUG repeats accumulate in nuclear foci and ultimately cause mis-splicing of secondary genes through the dysregulation of RNA-binding proteins including Muscleblind 1 (MBNL1) and CUG binding protein 1 (CUGBP1). Correction of mis-splicing of genes such as the Skeletal muscle-specific chloride channel 1 (CLCN1), Cardiac troponin T (TNNT2), Insulin receptor (INSR) and Sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)ATPase 1 (SERCA1) may alleviate some of the symptoms of DM1; hence identification of small molecule modulators is an important step towards a therapy for DM1 patients. Here we describe the generation of immortalized myoblast cell lines derived from healthy (DMPK CTG(5)) and DM1 patient (DMPK CTG(1000)) fibroblasts by constitutive overexpression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and inducible overexpression of the Myoblast determination factor (MYOD). MBNL1-containing nuclear foci, mis-splicing events and defective myotube differentiation defects characteristic of DM1 were observed in these cells. A CLCN1 luciferase minigene construct (CLCN1-luc) was stably introduced to monitor intron 2 retention in the DM1 cellular context (a reported splicing defect in DM1). The assay was validated by performing a high-throughput screen (HTS) of ~13,000 low molecular weight compounds against the CLCN1-luc DM1 myoblast cell line, providing an ideal system for conducting HTS to better understand and treat DM1.
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Identification of small molecule and genetic modulators of AON-induced dystrophin exon skipping by high-throughput screening.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 11-02-2009
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One therapeutic approach to Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) recently entering clinical trials aims to convert DMD phenotypes to that of a milder disease variant, Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD), by employing antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) targeting splice sites, to induce exon skipping and restore partial dystrophin function. In order to search for small molecule and genetic modulators of AON-dependent and independent exon skipping, we screened approximately 10,000 known small molecule drugs, >17,000 cDNA clones, and >2,000 kinase- targeted siRNAs against a 5.6 kb luciferase minigene construct, encompassing exon 71 to exon 73 of human dystrophin. As a result, we identified several enhancers of exon skipping, acting on both the reporter construct as well as endogenous dystrophin in mdx cells. Multiple mechanisms of action were identified, including histone deacetylase inhibition, tubulin modulation and pre-mRNA processing. Among others, the nucleolar protein NOL8 and staufen RNA binding protein homolog 2 (Stau2) were found to induce endogenous exon skipping in mdx cells in an AON-dependent fashion. An unexpected but recurrent theme observed in our screening efforts was the apparent link between the inhibition of cell cycle progression and the induction of exon skipping.
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p75 reduces beta-amyloid-induced sympathetic innervation deficits in an Alzheimers disease mouse model.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 04-27-2009
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Beta-amyloid (Abeta) has adverse effects on brain cells, but little is known about its effects on the peripheral nervous system in Alzheimers disease (AD). Several lines of in vitro evidence suggest that the neurotrophin receptor p75 mediates or exacerbates Abeta-induced neurotoxicity. Here, we show that p75-deficient sympathetic neurons are more sensitive to Abeta-induced neurite growth inhibition. To investigate the role of p75 in the sympathetic nervous system of AD, p75 mutant mice were crossed with a mouse line of AD model. The majority of p75-deficient AD mice died by 3 weeks of age. The lethality is associated with severe defects in sympathetic innervation to multiple organs. When 1 copy of the BACE1 gene encoding a protein essential in Abeta production was deleted in p75-deficient AD mice, sympathetic innervation was significantly restored. These results suggest that p75 is neuroprotective for the sympathetic nervous system in a mouse model of AD.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.