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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Novel mathematical algorithm for pupillometric data analysis.
Comput Methods Programs Biomed
PUBLISHED: 06-20-2013
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Pupillometry is used clinically to evaluate retinal and optic nerve function by measuring pupillary response to light stimuli. We have developed a mathematical algorithm to automate and expedite the analysis of non-filtered, non-calculated pupillometric data obtained from mouse pupillary light reflex recordings, obtained from dynamic pupillary diameter recordings following exposure of varying light intensities. The non-filtered, non-calculated pupillometric data is filtered through a low pass finite impulse response (FIR) filter. Thresholding is used to remove data caused by eye blinking, loss of pupil tracking, and/or head movement. Twelve physiologically relevant parameters were extracted from the collected data: (1) baseline diameter, (2) minimum diameter, (3) response amplitude, (4) re-dilation amplitude, (5) percent of baseline diameter, (6) response time, (7) re-dilation time, (8) average constriction velocity, (9) average re-dilation velocity, (10) maximum constriction velocity, (11) maximum re-dilation velocity, and (12) onset latency. No significant differences were noted between parameters derived from algorithm calculated values and manually derived results (p?0.05). This mathematical algorithm will expedite endpoint data derivation and eliminate human error in the manual calculation of pupillometric parameters from non-filtered, non-calculated pupillometric values. Subsequently, these values can be used as reference metrics for characterizing the natural history of retinal disease. Furthermore, it will be instrumental in the assessment of functional visual recovery in humans and pre-clinical models of retinal degeneration and optic nerve disease following pharmacological or gene-based therapies.
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Safety and efficacy of subretinal readministration of a viral vector in large animals to treat congenital blindness.
Sci Transl Med
PUBLISHED: 04-09-2010
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Lebers congenital amaurosis (LCA) is a group of severe inherited retinal degenerations that are symptomatic in infancy and lead to total blindness in adulthood. Recent clinical trials using recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (rAAV2) successfully reversed blindness in patients with LCA caused by RPE65 mutations after one subretinal injection. However, it was unclear whether treatment of the second eye in the same manner would be safe and efficacious, given the potential for a complicating immune response after the first injection. Here, we evaluated the immunological and functional consequences of readministration of rAAV2-hRPE65v2 to the contralateral eye using large animal models. Neither RPE65-mutant (affected; RPE65(-/-)) nor unaffected animals developed antibodies against the transgene product, but all developed neutralizing antibodies against the AAV2 capsid in sera and intraocular fluid after subretinal injection. Cell-mediated immune responses were benign, with only 1 of 10 animals in the study developing a persistent T cell immune response to AAV2, a response that was mediated by CD4(+) T cells. Sequential bilateral injection caused minimal inflammation and improved visual function in affected animals. Thus, subretinal readministration of rAAV2 in animals is safe and effective, even in the setting of preexisting immunity to the vector, a parameter that has been used to exclude patients from gene therapy trials.
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An arteriovenous fistula of the maxillary artery as a complication of Le Fort I osteotomy.
J Craniomaxillofac Surg
PUBLISHED: 04-02-2009
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The Le Fort I osteotomy, one of the most common techniques used to correct dento-midfacial deformities, is generally considered to be operatively safe. However, sometimes this procedure can lead to fatal vascular complications.
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Iron chelation protects the retinal pigment epithelial cell line ARPE-19 against cell death triggered by diverse stimuli.
Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 01-31-2009
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Cell death can be induced by exogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS). Endogenous ROS can also play a role in cell death triggered by agents that are not themselves ROS. One of the most potent ROS-generating systems is the iron-catalyzed Fenton reaction. Herein, the authors tested whether iron plays an important role in cell death induced by diverse stimuli in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.