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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Prothrombotic effects of thrombolytic therapy in a rat (Rattus norvegicus) model of venous thrombolysis.
Comp. Med.
PUBLISHED: 06-14-2013
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The use of thrombolytic agents has greatly improved patient outcomes, but the prothrombotic response to these drugs in vivo is unknown. Approximately 24 h after we induced thrombosis in male Sprague-Dawley rats, we placed an infusion line in the inferior vena cava and administered either saline or a thrombolytic agent (tissue plasminogen activator [tPA] or plasmin) for 30 min. Blood was drawn immediately after infusion; rats were euthanized 24 h after infusion for collection of blood and tissue (inferior vena cava and thrombus). Thrombus size was decreased in the tPA-treated rats but not in those that received saline or plasmin; this change correlated with the significant rise in D-dimer levels noted immediately after infusion in the tPA-treated rats. Plasma soluble P-selectin, a prothrombotic marker, was elevated at 24 h in the plasmin group compared with the other treatment groups. There were no significant differences in plasma C3a, C5a, or C5b9 levels or in thrombus C3 levels between groups. According to ultrastructural analysis, thrombus structure and vein wall effects did not differ between groups. Local tPA did not induce a prothrombotic state during acute DVT or after thrombolytic therapy in a rodent model of venous thrombolysis. Conversely, levels of the prothrombotic marker plasma soluble P-selectin increased when plasmin was administered.
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Histological observation of islet hemorrhage induced by diagnostic ultrasound with contrast agent in rat pancreas.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 03-22-2011
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Contrast enhanced diagnostic ultrasound CEDUS has been shown to induce capillary hemorrhage in heart and kidney. This study characterized the capillary hemorrhage induced in rat pancreas. The pancreata of anesthetized hairless rats were accessed by laparotomy. A 1.5 MHz diagnostic ultrasound probe with 2.3 MPa peak rarefactional pressure amplitude and 1 s intermittent trigger was used to scan the pancreas, located at the focus (3.8 cm), through saline coupling. The probe was swept to expose the entire organ in 5 min during infusion of Definity® contrast agent at 10 µL/kg/min, and this was repeated in a reverse sweep. The entire pancreas was removed, spread flat for fixation and histological slides were prepared from the mid-plane. Slides were scored blind for islet hemorrhage over the entire area of the organ. Intra-islet microlesions were evident and hemorrhage surrounded many islets. The hemorrhage often impacted nearby acini, and expanded into inter-lobular septa. In CEDUS pancreata removed soon after scanning, 76.2±11.8% (n?=?6) of islets had evidence of hemorrhage and/or islet microlesions compared to 1.1±2.5% (n?=?5) for sham CEDUS (P<0.001). In pancreata removed after 4 hr, fibrin formation was detected by immunohistology in the hemorrhage and intra-islet microlesions. Diagnostic ultrasound with contrast agent induced substantial capillary hemorrhage in rat pancreas, concentrated particularly in the islets.
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Efficient cellular release of Rift Valley fever virus requires genomic RNA.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-20-2011
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The Rift Valley fever virus is responsible for periodic, explosive epizootics throughout sub-Saharan Africa. The development of therapeutics targeting this virus is difficult due to a limited understanding of the viral replicative cycle. Utilizing a virus-like particle system, we have established roles for each of the viral structural components in assembly, release, and virus infectivity. The envelope glycoprotein, Gn, was discovered to be necessary and sufficient for packaging of the genome, nucleocapsid protein and the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase into virus particles. Additionally, packaging of the genome was found to be necessary for the efficient release of particles, revealing a novel mechanism for the efficient generation of infectious virus. Our results identify possible conserved targets for development of anti-phlebovirus therapies.
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The HIV protease inhibitor saquinavir induces endoplasmic reticulum stress, autophagy, and apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells.
Gynecol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2009
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HIV patients taking antiretroviral protease inhibitors have a lower incidence of infection-associated malignancies, leading to the hypothesis that these drugs have antineoplastic activity. Given the need for novel treatment approaches in ovarian cancer, we sought to determine whether the protease inhibitor saquinavir has antineoplastic activity in ovarian cancer cell lines, and to elucidate the mechanism through which this occurs.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.