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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Animal models that best reproduce the clinical manifestations of human intoxication with organophosphorus compounds.
J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 06-06-2014
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The translational capacity of data generated in preclinical toxicological studies is contingent upon several factors, including the appropriateness of the animal model. The primary objectives of this article are: 1) to analyze the natural history of acute and delayed signs and symptoms that develop following an acute exposure of humans to organophosphorus (OP) compounds, with an emphasis on nerve agents; 2) to identify animal models of the clinical manifestations of human exposure to OPs; and 3) to review the mechanisms that contribute to the immediate and delayed OP neurotoxicity. As discussed in this study, clinical manifestations of an acute exposure of humans to OP compounds can be faithfully reproduced in rodents and nonhuman primates. These manifestations include an acute cholinergic crisis in addition to signs of neurotoxicity that develop long after the OP exposure, particularly chronic neurologic deficits consisting of anxiety-related behavior and cognitive deficits, structural brain damage, and increased slow electroencephalographic frequencies. Because guinea pigs and nonhuman primates, like humans, have low levels of circulating carboxylesterases-the enzymes that metabolize and inactivate OP compounds-they stand out as appropriate animal models for studies of OP intoxication. These are critical points for the development of safe and effective therapeutic interventions against OP poisoning because approval of such therapies by the Food and Drug Administration is likely to rely on the Animal Efficacy Rule, which allows exclusive use of animal data as evidence of the effectiveness of a drug against pathologic conditions that cannot be ethically or feasibly tested in humans.
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Cholecystocolonic fistula mimicking acute cholecystitis diagnosed unequivocally by computed tomography.
Emerg Radiol
PUBLISHED: 04-30-2013
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Cholecystocolonic fistula is an uncommon potential complication of cholecystitis found intraoperatively in 0.06-0.14 % of patients undergoing cholecystectomy and 0.1-0.5 % of autopsy series. Although cholecystocolonic fistula is the second most common cholecystoenteric fistula, second only to cholecystoduodenal fistula, it is diagnosed preoperatively in only 7.9 % of patients. Failure to preoperatively diagnose cholecystocolonic fistula places surgeons in precarious positions, as they may be forced to convert a seemingly routine cholecystectomy to a more sophisticated procedure coupled with adhesiolysis, colonic suturing, or colonic resection. We report a young patient who presented to the emergency department with complaints indicative of acute cholecystitis; however, preoperative ultrasound was suggestive of a cholecystoenteric fistula. Computed tomography and pathology were pathognomonic with clear visualization of the cholecystocolonic fistulous tract.
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Teaching NeuroImages: massive abdominal CSFoma.
Neurology
PUBLISHED: 03-27-2013
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A 31-year-old woman with congenital hydrocephalus status after ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement 23 years earlier presented with abdominal distention. The patient denied fever, headache, or sensory or motor abnormalities. Examination was notable for a tense abdomen. CT of the abdomen and pelvis demonstrated a massive, loculated, CSFoma, or CSF pseudocyst (figure). Ventriculoperitoneal shunts are associated with a variety of complications including tubing disruption, tip blockage, infection, intestinal perforation, tip migration, and CSFoma development.(1) CSFoma is a rare complication, thought to be caused by low-grade shunt infection, chronic inflammation, increased cerebral spinal fluid protein, or peritoneal adhesions, and is estimated to occur in 1.0% to 4.5% of cases, with a typical occurrence within 3 weeks to 5 years of shunt placement.(2,3) Treatment consists of external drainage or surgical excision followed by reconstruction of the shunt system.(4.)
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Self-complementary AAV2.5-BMP2-coated femoral allografts mediated superior bone healing versus live autografts in mice with equivalent biomechanics to unfractured femur.
Mol. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 01-04-2011
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Structural allografts used for critical bone defects have limited osteogenic properties for biointegration. Although ex vivo tissue-engineered constructs expressing bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) have demonstrated efficacy in critical defect models, similar success has not been achieved with off-the-shelf acellular approaches, including allografts coated with freeze-dried single-stranded adeno-associated virus (ssAAV-BMP2). To see whether the self-complementary AAV serotype 2.5 vector (scAAV2.5-BMP2) could overcome this, we performed side-by-side comparisons in vitro and in the murine femoral allograft model. Although ssAAV-BMP2 was unable to induce BMP2 expression and differentiation of C3H10T1/2 cells in culture, scAAV2.5-BMP2 transduction led to dose-dependent BMP2 expression and alkaline phosphatase activity, and displayed a 25-fold increased transduction efficiency in vivo. After 6 weeks, the ssAAV-BMP2 coating failed to demonstrate any significant effects. However, all allografts coated with 10(10) scAAV2.5-BMP2 formed a new cortical shell that was indistinguishable to that formed by live autografts. Additionally, coated allografts experienced reduced resorption resulting in a threefold increase in graft bone volume versus autograft. This led to biomechanical superiority versus both allografts and autografts, and equivalent torsional rigidity to unfractured femur. Collectively, these results demonstrate that scAAV2.5-BMP2 coating overcomes the major limitations of structural allografts, which can be used to heal critical defects of any size.
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Characterization of a recombinant adeno-associated virus type 2 Reference Standard Material.
Hum. Gene Ther.
PUBLISHED: 09-16-2010
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A recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 2 Reference Standard Material (rAAV2 RSM) has been produced and characterized with the purpose of providing a reference standard for particle titer, vector genome titer, and infectious titer for AAV2 gene transfer vectors. Production and purification of the reference material were carried out by helper virus-free transient transfection and chromatographic purification. The purified bulk material was vialed, confirmed negative for microbial contamination, and then distributed for characterization along with standard assay protocols and assay reagents to 16 laboratories worldwide. Using statistical transformation and modeling of the raw data, mean titers and confidence intervals were determined for capsid particles ({X}, 9.18?x?10¹¹ particles/ml; 95% confidence interval [CI], 7.89?x?10¹¹ to 1.05?x?10¹² particles/ml), vector genomes ({X}, 3.28?x?10¹? vector genomes/ml; 95% CI, 2.70?x?10¹? to 4.75?x?10¹? vector genomes/ml), transducing units ({X}, 5.09?x?10? transducing units/ml; 95% CI, 2.00?x?10? to 9.60?x?10? transducing units/ml), and infectious units ({X}, 4.37?x?10? TCID?? IU/ml; 95% CI, 2.06?x?10? to 9.26?x?10? TCID?? IU/ml). Further analysis confirmed the identity of the reference material as AAV2 and the purity relative to nonvector proteins as greater than 94%. One obvious trend in the quantitative data was the degree of variation between institutions for each assay despite the relatively tight correlation of assay results within an institution. This relatively poor degree of interlaboratory precision and accuracy was apparent even though attempts were made to standardize the assays by providing detailed protocols and common reagents. This is the first time that such variation between laboratories has been thoroughly documented and the findings emphasize the need in the field for universal reference standards. The rAAV2 RSM has been deposited with the American Type Culture Collection and is available to the scientific community to calibrate laboratory-specific internal titer standards. Anticipated uses of the rAAV2 RSM are discussed.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.