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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
The missense variation landscape of FTO, MC4R, and TMEM18 in obese children of African Ancestry.
Obesity (Silver Spring)
PUBLISHED: 03-19-2013
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Common variation at the loci harboring fat mass and obesity (FTO), melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R), and transmembrane protein 18 (TMEM18) is consistently reported as being statistically most strongly associated with obesity. Investigations if these loci also harbor rarer missense variants that confer substantially higher risk of common childhood obesity in African American (AA) children were conducted.
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Large sample size, wide variant spectrum, and advanced machine-learning technique boost risk prediction for inflammatory bowel disease.
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2013
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We performed risk assessment for Crohns disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), the two common forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), by using data from the International IBD Genetics Consortiums Immunochip project. This data set contains ~17,000 CD cases, ~13,000 UC cases, and ~22,000 controls from 15 European countries typed on the Immunochip. This custom chip provides a more comprehensive catalog of the most promising candidate variants by picking up the remaining common variants and certain rare variants that were missed in the first generation of GWAS. Given this unprecedented large sample size and wide variant spectrum, we employed the most recent machine-learning techniques to build optimal predictive models. Our final predictive models achieved areas under the curve (AUCs) of 0.86 and 0.83 for CD and UC, respectively, in an independent evaluation. To our knowledge, this is the best prediction performance ever reported for CD and UC to date.
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Identification of rare recurrent copy number variants in high-risk autism families and their prevalence in a large ASD population.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2013
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Structural variation is thought to play a major etiological role in the development of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), and numerous studies documenting the relevance of copy number variants (CNVs) in ASD have been published since 2006. To determine if large ASD families harbor high-impact CNVs that may have broader impact in the general ASD population, we used the Affymetrix genome-wide human SNP array 6.0 to identify 153 putative autism-specific CNVs present in 55 individuals with ASD from 9 multiplex ASD pedigrees. To evaluate the actual prevalence of these CNVs as well as 185 CNVs reportedly associated with ASD from published studies many of which are insufficiently powered, we designed a custom Illumina array and used it to interrogate these CNVs in 3,000 ASD cases and 6,000 controls. Additional single nucleotide variants (SNVs) on the array identified 25 CNVs that we did not detect in our family studies at the standard SNP array resolution. After molecular validation, our results demonstrated that 15 CNVs identified in high-risk ASD families also were found in two or more ASD cases with odds ratios greater than 2.0, strengthening their support as ASD risk variants. In addition, of the 25 CNVs identified using SNV probes on our custom array, 9 also had odds ratios greater than 2.0, suggesting that these CNVs also are ASD risk variants. Eighteen of the validated CNVs have not been reported previously in individuals with ASD and three have only been observed once. Finally, we confirmed the association of 31 of 185 published ASD-associated CNVs in our dataset with odds ratios greater than 2.0, suggesting they may be of clinical relevance in the evaluation of children with ASDs. Taken together, these data provide strong support for the existence and application of high-impact CNVs in the clinical genetic evaluation of children with ASD.
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Role of BMI-associated loci identified in GWAS meta-analyses in the context of common childhood obesity in European Americans.
Obesity (Silver Spring)
PUBLISHED: 07-21-2011
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Obesity is a serious health concern for children and adolescents, particularly in Western societies, where its incidence is now considered to have reached epidemic proportions. A number of genetic determinants of adult BMI have already been established through genome wide association studies (GWAS), most recently from the GIANT meta-analysis of such datasets combined. In this current study of European Americans, we examined the 32 loci detected in that GIANT study in the context of common childhood obesity within a cohort of 1,097 cases (defined as BMI ?95th percentile), together with 2,760 lean controls (defined as BMI <50th percentile), aged between 2 and 18 years old. Nine of these single-nucleotide polymorphims (SNPs) yielded at least nominal evidence for association with common childhood obesity, namely at the FTO, TMEM18, NRXN3, MC4R, SEC16B, GNPDA2, TNNI3K, QPCTL, and BDNF loci. However, overall 28 of the 32 loci showed directionally consistent effects to that of the adult BMI meta-analysis. We conclude that among the 32 loci that have been reported to associate with adult BMI in the largest meta-analysis of BMI to date, at least nine also contribute to the determination of common obesity in childhood in European Americans, as demonstrated by their associations in our pediatric cohort.
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A genome-wide meta-analysis of six type 1 diabetes cohorts identifies multiple associated loci.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-13-2011
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Diabetes impacts approximately 200 million people worldwide, of whom approximately 10% are affected by type 1 diabetes (T1D). The application of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has robustly revealed dozens of genetic contributors to the pathogenesis of T1D, with the most recent meta-analysis identifying in excess of 40 loci. To identify additional genetic loci for T1D susceptibility, we examined associations in the largest meta-analysis to date between the disease and ?2.54 million SNPs in a combined cohort of 9,934 cases and 16,956 controls. Targeted follow-up of 53 SNPs in 1,120 affected trios uncovered three new loci associated with T1D that reached genome-wide significance. The most significantly associated SNP (rs539514, P?=?5.66×10?¹¹) resides in an intronic region of the LMO7 (LIM domain only 7) gene on 13q22. The second most significantly associated SNP (rs478222, P?=?3.50×10?? resides in an intronic region of the EFR3B (protein EFR3 homolog B) gene on 2p23; however, the region of linkage disequilibrium is approximately 800 kb and harbors additional multiple genes, including NCOA1, C2orf79, CENPO, ADCY3, DNAJC27, POMC, and DNMT3A. The third most significantly associated SNP (rs924043, P?=?8.06×10?? lies in an intergenic region on 6q27, where the region of association is approximately 900 kb and harbors multiple genes including WDR27, C6orf120, PHF10, TCTE3, C6orf208, LOC154449, DLL1, FAM120B, PSMB1, TBP, and PCD2. These latest associated regions add to the growing repertoire of gene networks predisposing to T1D.
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Genome-wide copy number variation study associates metabotropic glutamate receptor gene networks with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 06-24-2011
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Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common, heritable neuropsychiatric disorder of unknown etiology. We performed a whole-genome copy number variation (CNV) study on 1,013 cases with ADHD and 4,105 healthy children of European ancestry using 550,000 SNPs. We evaluated statistically significant findings in multiple independent cohorts, with a total of 2,493 cases with ADHD and 9,222 controls of European ancestry, using matched platforms. CNVs affecting metabotropic glutamate receptor genes were enriched across all cohorts (P = 2.1 × 10(-9)). We saw GRM5 (encoding glutamate receptor, metabotropic 5) deletions in ten cases and one control (P = 1.36 × 10(-6)). We saw GRM7 deletions in six cases, and we saw GRM8 deletions in eight cases and no controls. GRM1 was duplicated in eight cases. We experimentally validated the observed variants using quantitative RT-PCR. A gene network analysis showed that genes interacting with the genes in the GRM family are enriched for CNVs in ?10% of the cases (P = 4.38 × 10(-10)) after correction for occurrence in the controls. We identified rare recurrent CNVs affecting glutamatergic neurotransmission genes that were overrepresented in multiple ADHD cohorts.
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BMD-associated variation at the Osterix locus is correlated with childhood obesity in females.
Obesity (Silver Spring)
PUBLISHED: 01-06-2011
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Recent genome wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed a number of genetic variants robustly associated with bone mineral density (BMD) and/or osteoporosis. Evidence from epidemiological and clinical studies has shown an association between BMD and BMI, presumably as a consequence of bone loading. We investigated the 23 previously published BMD GWAS-derived loci in the context of childhood obesity by leveraging our existing genome-wide genotyped European American cohort of 1106 obese children (BMI ? 95th percentile) and 5997 controls (BMI < 95th percentile). Evidence of association was only observed at one locus, namely Osterix (SP7), with the G allele of rs2016266 being significantly over-represented among childhood obesity cases (P = 2.85 × 10(-3)). When restricting these analyses to each gender, we observed strong association between rs2016266 and childhood obesity in females (477 cases and 2867 controls; P = 3.56 × 10(-4)), which survived adjustment for all tests applied. However, no evidence of association was observed among males. Interestingly, Osterix is the only GWAS locus uncovered to date that has also been previously implicated in the determination of BMD in childhood. In conclusion, these findings indicate that a well established variant at the Osterix locus associated with increased BMD is also associated with childhood obesity primarily in females.
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Integrative genomics identifies LMO1 as a neuroblastoma oncogene.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 10-22-2010
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Neuroblastoma is a childhood cancer of the sympathetic nervous system that accounts for approximately 10% of all paediatric oncology deaths. To identify genetic risk factors for neuroblastoma, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on 2,251 patients and 6,097 control subjects of European ancestry from four case series. Here we report a significant association within LIM domain only 1 (LMO1) at 11p15.4 (rs110419, combined P = 5.2?×?10(-16), odds ratio of risk allele = 1.34 (95% confidence interval 1.25-1.44)). The signal was enriched in the subset of patients with the most aggressive form of the disease. LMO1 encodes a cysteine-rich transcriptional regulator, and its paralogues (LMO2, LMO3 and LMO4) have each been previously implicated in cancer. In parallel, we analysed genome-wide DNA copy number alterations in 701 primary tumours. We found that the LMO1 locus was aberrant in 12.4% through a duplication event, and that this event was associated with more advanced disease (P?
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Meta-analysis of Dense Genecentric Association Studies Reveals Common and Uncommon Variants Associated with Height.
Matthew B Lanktree, Yiran Guo, Muhammed Murtaza, Joseph T Glessner, Swneke D Bailey, N Charlotte Onland-Moret, Guillaume Lettre, Halit Ongen, Ramakrishnan Rajagopalan, Toby Johnson, Haiqing Shen, Christopher P Nelson, Norman Klopp, Jens Baumert, Sandosh Padmanabhan, Nathan Pankratz, James S Pankow, Sonia Shah, Kira Taylor, John Barnard, Bas J Peters, Cliona M Maloney, Maximilian T Lobmeyer, Alice Stanton, M Hadi Zafarmand, Simon P R Romaine, Amar Mehta, Erik P A van Iperen, Yan Gong, Tom S Price, Erin N Smith, Cecilia E Kim, Yun R Li, Folkert W Asselbergs, Larry D Atwood, Kristian M Bailey, Deepak Bhatt, Florianne Bauer, Elijah R Behr, Tushar Bhangale, Jolanda M A Boer, Bernhard O Boehm, Jonathan P Bradfield, Morris Brown, Peter S Braund, Paul R Burton, Cara Carty, Hareesh R Chandrupatla, Wei Chen, John Connell, Chrysoula Dalgeorgou, Anthonius de Boer, Fotios Drenos, Clara C Elbers, James C Fang, Caroline S Fox, Edward C Frackelton, Barry Fuchs, Clement E Furlong, Quince Gibson, Christian Gieger, Anuj Goel, Diederik E Grobbee, Claire Hastie, Philip J Howard, Guan-Hua Huang, W Craig Johnson, Qing Li, Marcus E Kleber, Barbara E K Klein, Ronald Klein, Charles Kooperberg, Bonnie Ky, Andrea LaCroix, Paul Lanken, Mark Lathrop, Mingyao Li, Vanessa Marshall, Olle Melander, Frank D Mentch, Nuala J Meyer, Keri L Monda, Alexandre Montpetit, Gurunathan Murugesan, Karen Nakayama, Dave Nondahl, Abiodun Onipinla, Suzanne Rafelt, Stephen J Newhouse, F George Otieno, Sanjey R Patel, Mary E Putt, Santiago Rodriguez, Radwan N Safa, Douglas B Sawyer, Pamela J Schreiner, Claire Simpson, Suthesh Sivapalaratnam, Sathanur R Srinivasan, Christine Suver, Gary Swergold, Nancy K Sweitzer, Kelly A Thomas, Barbara Thorand, Nicholas J Timpson, Sam Tischfield, Martin Tobin, Maciej Tomaszewski, Maciej Tomaszweski, W M Monique Verschuren, Chris Wallace, Bernhard Winkelmann, Haitao Zhang, Dongling Zheng, Li Zhang, Joseph M Zmuda, Robert Clarke, Anthony J Balmforth, John Danesh, Ian N Day, Nicholas J Schork, Paul I W de Bakker, Christian Delles, David Duggan, Aroon D Hingorani, Joel N Hirschhorn, Marten H Hofker, Steve E Humphries, Mika Kivimäki, Debbie A Lawlor, Kandice Kottke-Marchant, Jessica L Mega, Braxton D Mitchell, David A Morrow, Jutta Palmen, Susan Redline, Denis C Shields, Alan R Shuldiner, Patrick M Sleiman, George Davey Smith, Martin Farrall, Yalda Jamshidi, David C Christiani, Juan P Casas, Alistair S Hall, Pieter A Doevendans, Jason D Christie, Gerald S Berenson, Sarah S Murray, Thomas Illig, Gerald W Dorn, Thomas P Cappola, Eric Boerwinkle, Peter Sever, Daniel J Rader, Muredach P Reilly, Mark Caulfield, Philippa J Talmud, Eric Topol, James C Engert, Kai Wang, Anna Dominiczak, Anders Hamsten, Sean P Curtis, Roy L Silverstein, Leslie A Lange, Marc S Sabatine, Mieke Trip, Danish Saleheen, John F Peden, Karen J Cruickshanks, Winfried März, Jeffrey R O'Connell, Olaf H Klungel, Cisca Wijmenga, Anke Hilse Maitland-van der Zee, Eric E Schadt, Julie A Johnson, Gail P Jarvik, George J Papanicolaou, , Struan F A Grant, Patricia B Munroe, Kari E North, Nilesh J Samani, Wolfgang Koenig, Tom R Gaunt, Sonia S Anand, Yvonne T van der Schouw, Nicole Soranzo, Garret A FitzGerald, Alex Reiner, Robert A Hegele, Hakon Hakonarson, Brendan J Keating.
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 09-14-2010
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Height is a classic complex trait with common variants in a growing list of genes known to contribute to the phenotype. Using a genecentric genotyping array targeted toward cardiovascular-related loci, comprising 49,320 SNPs across approximately 2000 loci, we evaluated the association of common and uncommon SNPs with adult height in 114,223 individuals from 47 studies and six ethnicities. A total of 64 loci contained a SNP associated with height at array-wide significance (p < 2.4 × 10(-6)), with 42 loci surpassing the conventional genome-wide significance threshold (p < 5 × 10(-8)). Common variants with minor allele frequencies greater than 5% were observed to be associated with height in 37 previously reported loci. In individuals of European ancestry, uncommon SNPs in IL11 and SMAD3, which would not be genotyped with the use of standard genome-wide genotyping arrays, were strongly associated with height (p < 3 × 10(-11)). Conditional analysis within associated regions revealed five additional variants associated with height independent of lead SNPs within the locus, suggesting allelic heterogeneity. Although underpowered to replicate findings from individuals of European ancestry, the direction of effect of associated variants was largely consistent in African American, South Asian, and Hispanic populations. Overall, we show that dense coverage of genes for uncommon SNPs, coupled with large-scale meta-analysis, can successfully identify additional variants associated with a common complex trait.
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Duplication of the SLIT3 locus on 5q35.1 predisposes to major depressive disorder.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 08-03-2010
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Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a common psychiatric and behavioral disorder. To discover novel variants conferring risk to MDD, we conducted a whole-genome scan of copy number variation (CNV), including 1,693 MDD cases and 4,506 controls genotyped on the Perlegen 600K platform. The most significant locus was observed on 5q35.1, harboring the SLIT3 gene (P?=?2×10(-3)). Extending the controls with 30,000 subjects typed on the Illumina 550 k array, we found the CNV to remain exclusive to MDD cases (P?=?3.2×10(-9)). Duplication was observed in 5 unrelated MDD cases encompassing 646 kb with highly similar breakpoints. SLIT3 is integral to repulsive axon guidance based on binding to Roundabout receptors. Duplication of 5q35.1 is a highly penetrant variation accounting for 0.7% of the subset of 647 cases harboring large CNVs, using a threshold of a minimum of 10 SNPs and 100 kb. This study leverages a large dataset of MDD cases and controls for the analysis of CNVs with matched platform and ethnicity. SLIT3 duplication is a novel association which explains a definitive proportion of the largely unknown etiology of MDD.
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A genome-wide study reveals copy number variants exclusive to childhood obesity cases.
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-12-2010
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The prevalence of obesity in children and adults in the United States has increased dramatically over the past decade. Genomic copy number variations (CNVs) have been strongly implicated in subjects with extreme obesity and coexisting developmental delay. To complement these previous studies, we addressed CNVs in common childhood obesity by examining children with a BMI in the upper 5(th) percentile but excluding any subject greater than three standard deviations from the mean in order to reduce severe cases in the cohort. We performed a whole-genome CNV survey of our cohort of 1080 defined European American (EA) childhood obesity cases and 2500 lean controls (< 50(th) percentile BMI) who were genotyped with 550,000 SNP markers. Positive findings were evaluated in an independent African American (AA) cohort of 1479 childhood obesity cases and 1575 lean controls. We identified 17 CNV loci that were unique to at least three EA cases and were both previously unreported in the public domain and validated via quantitative PCR. Eight of these loci (47.1%) also replicated exclusively in AA cases (six deletions and two duplications). Replicated deletion loci consisted of EDIL3, S1PR5, FOXP2, TBCA, ABCB5, and ZPLD1, whereas replicated duplication loci consisted of KIF2B and ARL15. We also observed evidence for a deletion at the EPHA6-UNQ6114 locus when the AA cohort was investigated as a discovery set. Although these variants may be individually rare, our results indicate that CNVs contribute to the genetic susceptibility of common childhood obesity in subjects of both European and African ancestry.
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Strong synaptic transmission impact by copy number variations in schizophrenia.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 05-20-2010
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Schizophrenia is a psychiatric disorder with onset in late adolescence and unclear etiology characterized by both positive and negative symptoms, as well as cognitive deficits. To identify copy number variations (CNVs) that increase the risk of schizophrenia, we performed a whole-genome CNV analysis on a cohort of 977 schizophrenia cases and 2,000 healthy adults of European ancestry who were genotyped with 1.7 million probes. Positive findings were evaluated in an independent cohort of 758 schizophrenia cases and 1,485 controls. The Gene Ontology synaptic transmission family of genes was notably enriched for CNVs in the cases (P = 1.5 x 10(-7)). Among these, CACNA1B and DOC2A, both calcium-signaling genes responsible for neuronal excitation, were deleted in 16 cases and duplicated in 10 cases, respectively. In addition, RET and RIT2, both ras-related genes important for neural crest development, were significantly affected by CNVs. RET deletion was exclusive to seven cases, and RIT2 deletions were overrepresented common variant CNVs in the schizophrenia cases. Our results suggest that novel variations involving the processes of synaptic transmission contribute to the genetic susceptibility of schizophrenia.
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In silico replication of the genome-wide association results of the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-08-2010
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Recently, the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC) reported 22 novel type 1 diabetes (T1D)-associated loci identified by meta-analysis of three genome-wide association studies (GWASs) with a case-control design. However, the association of 10 of these 22 reported loci was not confirmed in the T1DGC family cohort (P > 0.1). To address concerns about potential bias from population stratification, this study aims to replicate the association in three independent GWAS cohorts, one of which was based on the stratification-proof transmission disequilibrium analysis. Three European-descent population samples were included in this study: 483 cases and both parents, a case-control cohort of 514 cases and 2027 controls, and an additional cohort of 1078 cases and 341 controls from the dbGaP database. Among the 22 SNPs reported by the T1DGC, we had high-quality genotypes for 15; the remaining were imputed. T1D association was replicated in seven loci after Bonferroni correction for 22 independent hypotheses. An additional eight loci had nominal (one-sided) significance of P < 0.1 in the same direction, giving a false discovery rate of 3.35%. The genetic susceptibility conferred by non-HLA loci in our family cohort with one affected offspring was higher than the T1DGC multiplex families. Reciprocally, the frequency of strongly predisposing HLA alleles in the multiplex families was higher. This study replicated T1D association with at least as many of these novel loci as expected from the power of our sample size, thus supporting the validity of the new discoveries.
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Comparative genetic analysis of inflammatory bowel disease and type 1 diabetes implicates multiple loci with opposite effects.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-22-2010
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Inflammatory bowel disease, including Crohns disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), and type 1 diabetes (T1D) are autoimmune diseases that may share common susceptibility pathways. We examined known susceptibility loci for these diseases in a cohort of 1689 CD cases, 777 UC cases, 989 T1D cases and 6197 shared control subjects of European ancestry, who were genotyped by the Illumina HumanHap550 SNP arrays. We identified multiple previously unreported or unconfirmed disease associations, including known CD loci (ICOSLG and TNFSF15) and T1D loci (TNFAIP3) that confer UC risk, known UC loci (HERC2 and IL26) that confer T1D risk and known UC loci (IL10 and CCNY) that confer CD risk. Additionally, we show that T1D risk alleles residing at the PTPN22, IL27, IL18RAP and IL10 loci protect against CD. Furthermore, the strongest risk alleles for T1D within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) confer strong protection against CD and UC; however, given the multi-allelic nature of the MHC haplotypes, sequencing of the MHC locus will be required to interpret this observation. These results extend our current knowledge on genetic variants that predispose to autoimmunity, and suggest that many loci involved in autoimmunity may be under a balancing selection due to antagonistic pleiotropic effect. Our analysis implies that variants with opposite effects on different diseases may facilitate the maintenance of common susceptibility alleles in human populations, making autoimmune diseases especially amenable to genetic dissection by genome-wide association studies.
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Common variants at 5q22 associate with pediatric eosinophilic esophagitis.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-11-2010
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Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an allergic disorder characterized by the accumulation of eosinophils in the esophagus. We report association of EoE with variants at chromosome 5q22 encompassing TSLP and WDR36 (rs3806932, combined P = 3.19 x 10(-9)). TSLP is overexpressed in esophageal biopsies from individuals with EoE compared with unaffected individuals, whereas WDR36 expression is unaltered between the two groups. These data implicate the 5q22 locus in the pathogenesis of EoE and identify TSLP as the most likely candidate gene in the region.
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Common variants in HSPB7 and FRMD4B associated with advanced heart failure.
Circ Cardiovasc Genet
PUBLISHED: 02-02-2010
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Heart failure results from abnormalities in multiple biological processes that contribute to cardiac dysfunction. We tested the hypothesis that inherited variation in genes of known importance to cardiovascular biology would thus contribute to heart failure risk.
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The role of height-associated loci identified in genome wide association studies in the determination of pediatric stature.
BMC Med. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-20-2010
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Human height is considered highly heritable and correlated with certain disorders, such as type 2 diabetes and cancer. Despite environmental influences, genetic factors are known to play an important role in stature determination. A number of genetic determinants of adult height have already been established through genome wide association studies.
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Examination of all type 2 diabetes GWAS loci reveals HHEX-IDE as a locus influencing pediatric BMI.
Diabetes
PUBLISHED: 11-23-2009
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A number of studies have found that BMI in early life influences the risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life. Our goal was to investigate if any type 2 diabetes variants uncovered through genome-wide association studies (GWAS) impact BMI in childhood.
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Common variants at five new loci associated with early-onset inflammatory bowel disease.
Marcin Imielinski, Robert N Baldassano, Anne Griffiths, Richard K Russell, Vito Annese, Marla Dubinsky, Subra Kugathasan, Jonathan P Bradfield, Thomas D Walters, Patrick Sleiman, Cecilia E Kim, Aleixo Muise, Kai Wang, Joseph T Glessner, Shehzad Saeed, Haitao Zhang, Edward C Frackelton, Cuiping Hou, James H Flory, George Otieno, Rosetta M Chiavacci, Robert Grundmeier, Massimo Castro, Anna Latiano, Bruno Dallapiccola, Joanne Stempak, Debra J Abrams, Kent Taylor, Dermot McGovern, , Gary Silber, Iwona Wrobel, Antonio Quiros, Jeffrey C Barrett, Sarah Hansoul, Dan L Nicolae, Judy H Cho, Richard H Duerr, John D Rioux, Steven R Brant, Mark S Silverberg, Kent D Taylor, M Michael Barmuda, Alain Bitton, Themistocles Dassopoulos, Lisa Wu Datta, Todd Green, Anne M Griffiths, Emily O Kistner, Michael T Murtha, Miguel D Regueiro, Jerome I Rotter, L Philip Schumm, A Hillary Steinhart, Stephen R Targan, Ramnik J Xavier, Cécile Libioulle, Cynthia Sandor, Mark Lathrop, Jacques Belaiche, Olivier Dewit, Ivo Gut, Simon Heath, Debby Laukens, Myriam Mni, Paul Rutgeerts, André Van Gossum, Diana Zelenika, Denis Franchimont, J P Hugot, Martine De Vos, Séverine Vermeire, Edouard Louis, Lon R Cardon, Carl A Anderson, Hazel Drummond, Elaine Nimmo, Tariq Ahmad, Natalie J Prescott, Clive M Onnie, Sheila A Fisher, Jonathan Marchini, Jilur Ghori, Suzannah Bumpstead, Rhian Gwillam, Mark Tremelling, Panos Delukas, John Mansfield, Derek Jewell, Jack Satsangi, Christopher G Mathew, Miles Parkes, Michel Georges, Mark J Daly, Melvin B Heyman, George D Ferry, Barbara Kirschner, Jessica Lee, Jonah Essers, Richard Grand, Michael Stephens, Arie Levine, David Piccoli, John Van Limbergen, Salvatore Cucchiara, Dimitri S Monos, Stephen L Guthery, Lee Denson, David C Wilson, Straun F A Grant, Mark Daly, Hakon Hakonarson.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-31-2009
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The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) Crohns disease and ulcerative colitis are common causes of morbidity in children and young adults in the western world. Here we report the results of a genome-wide association study in early-onset IBD involving 3,426 affected individuals and 11,963 genetically matched controls recruited through international collaborations in Europe and North America, thereby extending the results from a previous study of 1,011 individuals with early-onset IBD. We have identified five new regions associated with early-onset IBD susceptibility, including 16p11 near the cytokine gene IL27 (rs8049439, P = 2.41 x 10(-9)), 22q12 (rs2412973, P = 1.55 x 10(-9)), 10q22 (rs1250550, P = 5.63 x 10(-9)), 2q37 (rs4676410, P = 3.64 x 10(-8)) and 19q13.11 (rs10500264, P = 4.26 x 10(-10)). Our scan also detected associations at 23 of 32 loci previously implicated in adult-onset Crohns disease and at 8 of 17 loci implicated in adult-onset ulcerative colitis, highlighting the close pathogenetic relationship between early- and adult-onset IBD.
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High-resolution mapping and analysis of copy number variations in the human genome: a data resource for clinical and research applications.
Genome Res.
PUBLISHED: 07-10-2009
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We present a database of copy number variations (CNVs) detected in 2026 disease-free individuals, using high-density, SNP-based oligonucleotide microarrays. This large cohort, comprised mainly of Caucasians (65.2%) and African-Americans (34.2%), was analyzed for CNVs in a single study using a uniform array platform and computational process. We have catalogued and characterized 54,462 individual CNVs, 77.8% of which were identified in multiple unrelated individuals. These nonunique CNVs mapped to 3272 distinct regions of genomic variation spanning 5.9% of the genome; 51.5% of these were previously unreported, and >85% are rare. Our annotation and analysis confirmed and extended previously reported correlations between CNVs and several genomic features such as repetitive DNA elements, segmental duplications, and genes. We demonstrate the utility of this data set in distinguishing CNVs with pathologic significance from normal variants. Together, this analysis and annotation provides a useful resource to assist with the assessment of CNVs in the contexts of human variation, disease susceptibility, and clinical molecular diagnostics.
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Examination of type 2 diabetes loci implicates CDKAL1 as a birth weight gene.
Diabetes
PUBLISHED: 07-10-2009
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A number of studies have found that reduced birth weight is associated with type 2 diabetes later in life; however, the underlying mechanism for this correlation remains unresolved. Recently, association has been demonstrated between low birth weight and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the CDKAL1 and HHEX-IDE loci, regions that were previously implicated in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. In order to investigate whether type 2 diabetes risk-conferring alleles associate with low birth weight in our Caucasian childhood cohort, we examined the effects of 20 such loci on this trait.
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The role of obesity-associated loci identified in genome-wide association studies in the determination of pediatric BMI.
Obesity (Silver Spring)
PUBLISHED: 05-28-2009
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The prevalence of obesity in children and adults in the United States has increased dramatically over the past decade. Besides environmental factors, genetic factors are known to play an important role in the pathogenesis of obesity. A number of genetic determinants of adult BMI have already been established through genome-wide association (GWA) studies. In this study, we examined 25 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) corresponding to 13 previously reported genomic loci in 6,078 children with measures of BMI. Fifteen of these SNPs yielded at least nominally significant association to BMI, representing nine different loci including INSIG2, FTO, MC4R, TMEM18, GNPDA2, NEGR1, BDNF, KCTD15, and 1q25. Other loci revealed no evidence for association, namely at MTCH2, SH2B1, 12q13, and 3q27. For the 15 associated variants, the genotype score explained 1.12% of the total variation for BMI z-score. We conclude that among 13 loci that have been reported to associate with adult BMI, at least nine also contribute to the determination of BMI in childhood as demonstrated by their associations in our pediatric cohort.
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Follow-up analysis of genome-wide association data identifies novel loci for type 1 diabetes.
Diabetes
PUBLISHED: 03-31-2009
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Two recent genome-wide association (GWA) studies have revealed novel loci for type 1 diabetes, a common multifactorial disease with a strong genetic component. To fully utilize the GWA data that we had obtained by genotyping 563 type 1 diabetes probands and 1,146 control subjects, as well as 483 case subject-parent trios, using the Illumina HumanHap550 BeadChip, we designed a full stage 2 study to capture other possible association signals.
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Common genetic variants on 5p14.1 associate with autism spectrum disorders.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 03-18-2009
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Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) represent a group of childhood neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders characterized by deficits in verbal communication, impairment of social interaction, and restricted and repetitive patterns of interests and behaviour. To identify common genetic risk factors underlying ASDs, here we present the results of genome-wide association studies on a cohort of 780 families (3,101 subjects) with affected children, and a second cohort of 1,204 affected subjects and 6,491 control subjects, all of whom were of European ancestry. Six single nucleotide polymorphisms between cadherin 10 (CDH10) and cadherin 9 (CDH9)-two genes encoding neuronal cell-adhesion molecules-revealed strong association signals, with the most significant SNP being rs4307059 (P = 3.4 x 10(-8), odds ratio = 1.19). These signals were replicated in two independent cohorts, with combined P values ranging from 7.4 x 10(-8) to 2.1 x 10(-10). Our results implicate neuronal cell-adhesion molecules in the pathogenesis of ASDs, and represent, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of genome-wide significant association of common variants with susceptibility to ASDs.
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Investigation of the locus near MC4R with childhood obesity in Americans of European and African ancestry.
Obesity (Silver Spring)
PUBLISHED: 03-05-2009
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Recently a modest, but consistently, replicated association was demonstrated between obesity and the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs17782313, 3 of the MC4R locus as a consequence of a meta-analysis of genome-wide association (GWA) studies of the disease in white populations. We investigated the association in the context of the childhood form of the disease utilizing data from our ongoing GWA study in a cohort of 728 European-American (EA) obese children (BMI > or =95th percentile) and 3,960 EA controls (BMI <95th percentile), as well as 1,008 African-American (AA) obese children and 2,715 AA controls. rs571312, rs10871777, and rs476828 (perfect surrogates for rs17782313) yielded odds ratios in the EA cohort of 1.142 (P = 0.045), 1.137 (P = 0.054), and 1.145 (P = 0.042); however, there was no significant association with these SNPs in the AA cohort. When investigating all 30 SNPs present on the Illumina BeadChip at this locus, again there was no evidence for association in AA cases when correcting for the number of tests employed. As such, variants 3 to the MC4R locus present on the genotyping platform utilized confer a similar magnitude of risk of obesity in white children as to their adult white counterparts but this observation did not extend to AAs.
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Autism genome-wide copy number variation reveals ubiquitin and neuronal genes.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 02-27-2009
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Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are childhood neurodevelopmental disorders with complex genetic origins. Previous studies focusing on candidate genes or genomic regions have identified several copy number variations (CNVs) that are associated with an increased risk of ASDs. Here we present the results from a whole-genome CNV study on a cohort of 859 ASD cases and 1,409 healthy children of European ancestry who were genotyped with approximately 550,000 single nucleotide polymorphism markers, in an attempt to comprehensively identify CNVs conferring susceptibility to ASDs. Positive findings were evaluated in an independent cohort of 1,336 ASD cases and 1,110 controls of European ancestry. Besides previously reported ASD candidate genes, such as NRXN1 (ref. 10) and CNTN4 (refs 11, 12), several new susceptibility genes encoding neuronal cell-adhesion molecules, including NLGN1 and ASTN2, were enriched with CNVs in ASD cases compared to controls (P = 9.5 x 10(-3)). Furthermore, CNVs within or surrounding genes involved in the ubiquitin pathways, including UBE3A, PARK2, RFWD2 and FBXO40, were affected by CNVs not observed in controls (P = 3.3 x 10(-3)). We also identified duplications 55 kilobases upstream of complementary DNA AK123120 (P = 3.6 x 10(-6)). Although these variants may be individually rare, they target genes involved in neuronal cell-adhesion or ubiquitin degradation, indicating that these two important gene networks expressed within the central nervous system may contribute to the genetic susceptibility of ASD.
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Diverse genome-wide association studies associate the IL12/IL23 pathway with Crohn Disease.
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2009
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Previous genome-wide association (GWA) studies typically focus on single-locus analysis, which may not have the power to detect the majority of genuinely associated loci. Here, we applied pathway analysis using Affymetrix SNP genotype data from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) and uncovered significant association between Crohn Disease (CD) and the IL12/IL23 pathway, harboring 20 genes (p = 8 x 10(-5)). Interestingly, the pathway contains multiple genes (IL12B and JAK2) or homologs of genes (STAT3 and CCR6) that were recently identified as genuine susceptibility genes only through meta-analysis of several GWA studies. In addition, the pathway contains other susceptibility genes for CD, including IL18R1, JUN, IL12RB1, and TYK2, which do not reach genome-wide significance by single-marker association tests. The observed pathway-specific association signal was subsequently replicated in three additional GWA studies of European and African American ancestry generated on the Illumina HumanHap550 platform. Our study suggests that examination beyond individual SNP hits, by focusing on genetic networks and pathways, is important to unleashing the true power of GWA studies.
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Association of the BANK 1 R61H variant with systemic lupus erythematosus in Americans of European and African ancestry.
Appl Clin Genet
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2009
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Recently an association was demonstrated between the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs10516487, within the B-cell gene BANK1 and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) as a consequence of a genome wide association study of this disease in European and Argentinean populations. In a bid for replication, we examined the effects of the R61H non-synonymous variant with respect to SLE in our genotyped American cohorts of European and African ancestry. Utilizing data from our ongoing genome-wide association study in our cohort of 178 Caucasian SLE cases and 1808 Caucasian population-based controls plus 148 African American (AA) SLE cases and 1894 AA population-based controls we investigated the association of the previously described non-synonymous SNP at the BANK1 locus with the disease in the two ethnicities separately. Using a Fishers exact test, the minor allele frequency (MAF) of rs10516487 in the Caucasian cases was 22.6% while it was 31.2% in Caucasian controls, yielding a protective odds ratio (OR) of 0.64 (95% CI 0.49-0.85; one-sided p = 7.07 × 10(-4)). Furthermore, the MAF of rs10516487 in the AA cases was 18.7% while it was 23.3% in AA controls, yielding a protective OR of 0.75 (95% CI 0.55-1.034; one-sided p = 0.039). The OR of the BANK1 variant in our study cohorts is highly comparable with that reported previously in a South American/European SLE case-control cohort (OR = 0.72). As such, R61H in the BANK1 gene confers a similar magnitude of SLE protection, not only in European Americans, but also in African Americans.
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Evaluating the role of the FUS/TLS-related gene EWSR1 in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
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Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease affecting motor neurons. Mutations in related RNA-binding proteins TDP-43, FUS/TLS and TAF15 have been connected to ALS. These three proteins share several features, including the presence of a bioinformatics-predicted prion domain, aggregation-prone nature in vitro and in vivo and toxic effects when expressed in multiple model systems. Given these commonalities, we hypothesized that a related protein, EWSR1 (Ewing sarcoma breakpoint region 1), might also exhibit similar properties and therefore could contribute to disease. Here, we report an analysis of EWSR1 in multiple functional assays, including mutational screening in ALS patients and controls. We identified three missense variants in EWSR1 in ALS patients, which were absent in a large number of healthy control individuals. We show that disease-specific variants affect EWSR1 localization in motor neurons. We also provide multiple independent lines of in vitro and in vivo evidence that EWSR1 has similar properties as TDP-43, FUS and TAF15, including aggregation-prone behavior in vitro and ability to confer neurodegeneration in Drosophila. Postmortem analysis of sporadic ALS cases also revealed cytoplasmic mislocalization of EWSR1. Together, our studies highlight a potential role for EWSR1 in ALS, provide a collection of functional assays to be used to assess roles of additional RNA-binding proteins in disease and support an emerging concept that a class of aggregation-prone RNA-binding proteins might contribute broadly to ALS and related neurodegenerative diseases.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.