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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Xpert MTB/RIF assay shortens airborne isolation for hospitalized patients with presumptive tuberculosis in the United States.
Clin. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 04-11-2014
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In the United States, individuals with presumptive pulmonary tuberculosis are placed in airborne infection isolation (AII) and assessed by smear microscopy on 3 respiratory specimens collected 8-24 hours apart. Xpert MTB/RIF assay (Xpert) on 1, 2, or 3 specimens may be more efficient for determining AII discontinuation.
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Comparison of the Biofire FilmArray RP, Genmark eSensor RVP, Luminex xTAG RVPv1, and Luminex xTAG RVP fast multiplex assays for detection of respiratory viruses.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 03-13-2013
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There are several U.S. FDA-cleared molecular respiratory virus panels available today, each with advantages and disadvantages. This study compares four multiplex panels, the BioFire Diagnostics FilmArray RP (respiratory panel), the GenMark Dx eSensor RVP (respiratory viral panel), the Luminex xTAG RVPv1, and the Luminex xTAG RVP fast. Three hundred specimens (200 retrospective and 100 consecutive) were tested using all four platforms to determine performance characteristics. The overall sensitivity and specificity, respectively, and 95% confidence interval (CI; in parentheses) for each panel were as follows: FilmArray RP, 84.5% (79.2, 88.6) and 100% (96.2, 100); eSensor RVP, 98.3% (95.5, 99.5) and 99.2% (95.4, 100); xTAG RVPv1, 92.7% (88.5, 95.4) and 99.8% (96.0, 100); and xTAG RVP fast, 84.4% (78.5, 88.9) and 99.9% (96.1, 100). The sensitivity of each assay fluctuated by viral target, with the greatest discrepancies noted for adenovirus and influenza virus B detection. Hands-on time and time to result were recorded and ease of use was assessed to generate a complete profile of each assay.
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Performance of Xpert MTB/RIF RUO assay and IS6110 real-time PCR for Mycobacterium tuberculosis detection in clinical samples.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 08-17-2011
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The Cepheid Xpert MTB/RIF research-use-only (RUO) assay and a laboratory-developed test (LDT) targeting IS6110 were evaluated and compared to mycobacterial culture as the gold standard. The performance characteristics of both molecular assays were determined by using 112 specimens from 90 patients, including 89 pulmonary specimens and 23 extrapulmonary specimens. Of the specimens tested, 37 (33%) were culture positive for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex; 29 were pulmonary, and 8 were extrapulmonary. Of these culture-positive specimens, 83% of the pulmonary specimens and 50% of the extrapulmonary specimens were smear positive. There was complete concordance between the smear-positive culture-positive specimens, independent of the anatomical site (100% sensitivity). The sensitivity of the MTB/RIF RUO assay for smear-negative specimens was 60% for pulmonary and 75% for extrapulmonary specimens, while the IS6110 LDT sensitivities were 40% and 0%, respectively. There was also complete concordance among the culture-negative specimens tested. Both assays showed 95% specificity, with four culture-negative specimens testing as positive. A review of patient records indicated that there was a high likelihood of the presence of M. tuberculosis complex DNA in the false-positive specimens. Biosafety analysis was performed and showed an acceptable reduction in organism viability using the processing methods described above. Both molecular assays are suitable for the detection of M. tuberculosis isolates in smear-positive pulmonary and extrapulmonary specimens, while the sensitivity of the detection of M. tuberculosis isolates in smear-negative specimens was variable.
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Retrospective and prospective verification of the Cepheid Xpert influenza virus assay.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 07-20-2011
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We performed a retrospective (n = 121) and prospective (n = 305) verification of the Cepheid Xpert Flu assay to determine its performance characteristics. The overall sensitivity and specificity were 93% and 100%, respectively. Nasopharyngeal specimen sensitivities were 100% for seasonal influenza A/H1 virus and influenza A/H3 virus, 90% for influenza A/2009/H1N1 virus, and 95% for influenza B virus.
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Prevalence and risk factor analysis for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization in children attending child care centers.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 12-29-2010
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Children attending child care centers (CCCs) are at increased risk for infections, including those caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Nasal colonization often precedes infection, and MRSA colonization has been associated with increased infection risk. Community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) has caused increased MRSA infections in the general population, including children. Little is known about the frequency of MRSA nasal colonization in young children, particularly in those attending CCCs where disease transmission is common. We sampled the nares of 1,163 children in 200 classrooms from 24 CCCs in North Carolina and Virginia to assess S. aureus colonization. MRSA strains were molecularly analyzed for staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type, Panton-Valentine leukocidin status, and multilocus sequence type. A case-control study was performed to identify risk factors for MRSA colonization. We found that 18.1% children were colonized with S. aureus and 1.3% with MRSA. Molecular analysis of the MRSA strains identified 47% as CA-MRSA and 53% as health care-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA). Although two centers had multiple children colonized with MRSA, genotyping indicated that no transmission had occurred within classrooms. The case-control study did not detect statistically significant risk factors for MRSA colonization. However, MRSA-colonized children were more likely to be nonwhite and to have increased exposure to antibiotics and skin infections in the home. Both CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA strains were found colonizing the nares of children attending CCCs. The low frequency of colonization observed highlights the need for a large multicenter study to determine risk factors for MRSA colonization and subsequent infection in this highly susceptible population.
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Comparative evaluation of the Nanosphere Verigene RV+ assay and the Simplexa Flu A/B & RSV kit for detection of influenza and respiratory syncytial viruses.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
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Using retrospective (n = 200) and prospective (n = 150) nasopharyngeal specimens, we evaluated the Nanosphere Verigene RV+ and the Focus Diagnostics Simplexa Flu A/B & RSV tests. Overall, RV+ demonstrated sensitivities and specificities of 96.6% and 100% for influenza A virus, 100% and 99.7% for influenza B virus, and 100% and 100% for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), while the Simplexa test sensitivities and specificities were 82.8 and 99.7%, 76.2 and 100%, and 94.6 and 100%, respectively.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.