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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Is the link from working memory to analogy causal? No analogy improvements following working memory training gains.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 09-04-2014
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Analogical reasoning has been hypothesized to critically depend upon working memory through correlational data, but less work has tested this relationship through experimental manipulation. An opportunity for examining the connection between working memory and analogical reasoning has emerged from the growing, although somewhat controversial, body of literature suggests complex working memory training can sometimes lead to working memory improvements that transfer to novel working memory tasks. This study investigated whether working memory improvements, if replicated, would increase analogical reasoning ability. We assessed participants' performance on verbal and visual analogy tasks after a complex working memory training program incorporating verbal and spatial tasks. Participants' improvements on the working memory training tasks transferred to other short-term and working memory tasks, supporting the possibility of broad effects of working memory training. However, we found no effects on analogical reasoning. We propose several possible explanations for the lack of an impact of working memory improvements on analogical reasoning.
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FAP20 is an inner junction protein of doublet microtubules essential for both the planar asymmetrical waveform and stability of flagella in Chlamydomonas.
Mol. Biol. Cell
PUBLISHED: 02-26-2014
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The axoneme-the conserved core of eukaryotic cilia and flagella-contains highly specialized doublet microtubules (DMTs). A long-standing question is what protein(s) compose the junctions between two tubules in DMT. Here we identify a highly conserved flagellar-associated protein (FAP), FAP20, as an inner junction (IJ) component. The flagella of Chlamydomonas FAP20 mutants have normal length but beat with an abnormal symmetrical three-dimensional pattern. In addition, the mutant axonemes are liable to disintegrate during beating, implying that interdoublet connections may be weakened. Conventional electron microscopy shows that the mutant axonemes lack the IJ, and cryo-electron tomography combined with a structural labeling method reveals that the labeled FAP20 localizes at the IJ. The mutant axonemes also lack doublet-specific beak structures, which are localized in the proximal portion of the axoneme and may be involved in planar asymmetric flagellar bending. FAP20 itself, however, may not be a beak component, because uniform localization of FAP20 along the entire length of all nine DMTs is inconsistent with the beak's localization. FAP20 is the first confirmed component of the IJ. Our data also suggest that the IJ is important for both stabilizing the axoneme and scaffolding intra-B-tubular substructures required for a planar asymmetrical waveform.
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Quality improvement in hospital management of community-acquired pneumonia: focus on new strategies and current challenges.
Curr Infect Dis Rep
PUBLISHED: 01-30-2014
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Community-acquired pneumonia is a common reason for hospitalization and leads to significant morbidity and mortality. There are published evidence-based guidelines for the diagnosis, treatment, and management of community-acquired pneumonia. Many countries, including the US, have developed national, publically reported quality measures related to the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia. This review highlights recent published innovations aimed at improving the quality of care for patients hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia. Interventions include standardized protocols and pathways, education and feedback from antimicrobial stewardship teams, and automated pharmacy technology. The importance of multidisciplinary collaboration and multidimensional interventions are discussed. Insight into local context and institutional support are essential to understanding the implementation of improvement efforts and these factors should be reported in future publications related to quality improvement.
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Isolation of intraflagellar transport particle proteins from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.
Meth. Enzymol.
PUBLISHED: 03-19-2013
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Cilia, the hair-like protrusions found on most eukaryotic cells, were once considered vestigial organelles. The recent renaissance of research in cilia arose from the discoveries of intraflagellar transport (IFT) and the involvement of IFT particle proteins in human diseases. Many IFT particle proteins have since been identified, and research on IFT particle complexes and their protein components continues to provide insight into the mechanism of IFT and the etiology of ciliopathies. In this chapter, we describe the methods of isolating IFT particles from the flagella of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Two methods, sucrose density gradient fractionation and immunoprecipitation, are explained in detail. Troubleshooting information is presented to illustrate the critical steps of the procedure to ensure successful implementation of these methods in individual labs.
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Navigating veterans with an abnormal prostate cancer screening test: a quasi-experimental study.
BMC Health Serv Res
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2013
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Prostate cancer disproportionately affects low-income and minority men. This study evaluates the impact of a patient navigation intervention on timeliness of diagnostic resolution and treatment initiation among veterans with an abnormal prostate cancer screen.
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Probing the role of IFT particle complex A and B in flagellar entry and exit of IFT-dynein in Chlamydomonas.
Protoplasma
PUBLISHED: 06-30-2011
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Mediating the transport of flagellar precursors and removal of turnover products, intraflagellar transport (IFT) is required for flagella assembly and maintenance. The IFT apparatus is composed of the anterograde IFT motor kinesin II, the retrograde IFT motor IFT-dynein, and IFT particles containing two complexes, A and B. In order to have a balanced two-way transportation, IFT-dynein has to be carried into flagella and transported to the flagellar tip by kinesin II, where it is activated to drive the retrograde IFT back to the flagellar base. In this study, we investigated the role of complex A and complex B in the flagellar entry and exit of IFT-dynein. We showed that regardless of the amount of complex A, IFT-dynein accumulated proportionally to the amount of complex B in the flagella of fla15/ift144 and fla17-1/ift139, two complex A temperature-sensitive mutants. Complex A was depleted from both cellular and flagellar compartments in fla15/ift144 mutant. However, in fla17-1/ift139 mutant, the flagellar level of complex A was at the wild-type level, which was in radical contrast to the significantly reduced cellular amount of complex A. These results support that complex A is not required for the flagellar entry of IFT-dynein, but might be essential for the lagellar exit of IFT-dynein. Additionally, we confirmed the essential role of IFT172, a complex B subunit, in the flagellar entry of IFT-dynein. These results indicate that complexes A and B play complementary but distinct roles for IFT-dynein, with complex B carrying IFT-dynein into the flagella while complex A mediates the flagellar exit of IFT-dynein.
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Costs and cost effectiveness of a health care provider-directed intervention to promote colorectal cancer screening.
J. Clin. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 10-13-2009
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Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening remains underutilized in the United States. Prior studies reporting the cost effectiveness of randomized interventions to improve CRC screening have not been replicated in the setting of small physician practices. We recently conducted a randomized trial evaluating an academic detailing intervention in 264 small practices in geographically diverse New York City communities. The objective of this secondary analysis is to assess the cost effectiveness of this intervention.
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Monoclonal antibody-associated progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy in patients treated with rituximab, natalizumab, and efalizumab: a Review from the Research on Adverse Drug Events and Reports (RADAR) Project.
Lancet Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 08-04-2009
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Progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy (PML) is a serious and usually fatal CNS infection caused by JC polyoma virus. CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphopenia, resulting from HIV infection, chemotherapy, or immunosuppressive therapy, are the primary risk factors. The immune modulatory monoclonal antibodies rituximab, natalizumab, and efalizumab have received regulatory approval in the USA and Europe for treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, rheumatoid arthritis, and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (Europe only); multiple sclerosis and Crohns disease; and psoriasis, respectively. Efalizumab and natalizumab administration is associated with CD4+ T lymphopenia and altered trafficking of T lymphocytes into the CNS, and rituximab leads to prolonged B-lymphocyte depletion. Unexpected cases of PML developing in people who receive these drugs have been reported, with many of the affected individuals dying from this disease. Herein, we review clinical findings, pathology, epidemiology, basic science, and risk-management issues associated with PML infection developing after treatment with these monoclonal antibodies.
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Accelerated approval of cancer drugs: improved access to therapeutic breakthroughs or early release of unsafe and ineffective drugs?
J. Clin. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 07-27-2009
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Accelerated approval (AA) was initiated by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to shorten development times of drugs for serious medical illnesses. Sponsors must confirm efficacy in postapproval trials. Confronted with several drugs that received AA on the basis of phase II trials and for which confirmatory trials were incomplete, FDA officials have encouraged sponsors to design AA applications on the basis of interim analyses of phase III trials.
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Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy after rituximab therapy in HIV-negative patients: a report of 57 cases from the Research on Adverse Drug Events and Reports project.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 03-05-2009
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Rituximab improves outcomes for persons with lymphoproliferative disorders and is increasingly used to treat immune-mediated illnesses. Recent reports describe 2 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and 1 with rheumatoid arthritis who developed progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) after rituximab treatment. We reviewed PML case descriptions among patients treated with rituximab from the Food and Drug Administration, the manufacturer, physicians, and a literature review from 1997 to 2008. Overall, 52 patients with lymphoproliferative disorders, 2 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, 1 patient with rheumatoid arthritis, 1 patient with an idiopathic autoimmune pancytopenia, and 1 patient with immune thrombocytopenia developed PML after treatment with rituximab and other agents. Other treatments included hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (7 patients), purine analogs (26 patients), or alkylating agents (39 patients). One patient with an autoimmune hemolytic anemia developed PML after treatment with corticosteroids and rituximab, and 1 patient with an autoimmune pancytopenia developed PML after treatment with corticosteroids, azathioprine, and rituximab. Median time from last rituximab dose to PML diagnosis was 5.5 months. Median time to death after PML diagnosis was 2.0 months. The case-fatality rate was 90%. Awareness is needed of the potential for PML among rituximab-treated persons.
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Ticlopidine- and clopidogrel-associated thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP): review of clinical, laboratory, epidemiological, and pharmacovigilance findings (1989-2008).
Kidney Int. Suppl.
PUBLISHED: 01-31-2009
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Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a fulminant disease characterized by platelet aggregates, thrombocytopenia, renal insufficiency, neurologic changes, and mechanical injury to erythrocytes. Most idiopathic cases of TTP are characterized by a deficiency of ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease, with thrombospondin-1-like domains) metalloprotease activity. Ironically, use of anti-platelet agents, the thienopyridine derivates clopidogrel and ticlopidine, is associated with drug induced TTP. Data were abstracted from a systematic review of English-language literature for thienopyridine-associated TTP identified in MEDLINE, EMBASE, the public website of the Food and Drug Administration, and abstracts from national scientific conferences from 1991 to April 2008. Ticlopidine and clopidogrel are the two most common drugs associated with TTP in FDA safety databases. Epidemiological studies identify recent initiation of anti-platelet agents as the most common risk factor associated with risks of developing TTP. Laboratory studies indicate that most cases of thienopyridine-associated TTP involve an antibody to ADAMTS13 metalloprotease, present with severe thrombocytopenia, and respond to therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE); a minority of thienopyridine-associated TTP presents with severe renal insufficiency, involves direct endothelial cell damage, and is less responsive to TPE. The evaluation of this potentially fatal drug toxicity can serve as a template for future efforts to comprehensively characterize other severe adverse drug reactions.
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Design of a prostate cancer patient navigation intervention for a Veterans Affairs hospital.
BMC Health Serv Res
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Patient navigation programs have been launched nationwide in an attempt to reduce racial/ethnic and socio-demographic disparities in cancer care, but few have evaluated outcomes in the prostate cancer setting. The National Cancer Institute-funded Chicago Patient Navigation Research Program (C-PNRP) aims to implement and evaluate the efficacy of a patient navigation intervention for predominantly low-income minority patients with an abnormal prostate cancer screening test at a Veterans Affairs (VA) hospital in Chicago.
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Dissecting the sequential assembly and localization of intraflagellar transport particle complex B in Chlamydomonas.
PLoS ONE
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Intraflagellar transport (IFT), the key mechanism for ciliogenesis, involves large protein particles moving bi-directionally along the entire ciliary length. IFT particles contain two large protein complexes, A and B, which are constructed with proteins in a core and several peripheral proteins. Prior studies have shown that in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, IFT46, IFT52, and IFT88 directly interact with each other and are in a subcomplex of the IFT B core. However, ift46, bld1, and ift88 mutants differ in phenotype as ift46 mutants are able to form short flagella, while the other two lack flagella completely. In this study, we investigated the functional differences of these individual IFT proteins contributing to complex B assembly, stability, and basal body localization. We found that complex B is completely disrupted in bld1 mutant, indicating an essential role of IFT52 for complex B core assembly. Ift46 mutant cells are capable of assembling a relatively intact complex B, but such complex is highly unstable and prone to degradation. In contrast, in ift88 mutant cells the complex B core still assembles and remains stable, but the peripheral proteins no longer attach to the B core. Moreover, in ift88 mutant cells, while complex A and the anterograde IFT motor FLA10 are localized normally to the transition fibers, complex B proteins instead are accumulated at the proximal ends of the basal bodies. In addition, in bld2 mutant, the IFT complex B proteins still localize to the proximal ends of defective centrioles which completely lack transition fibers. Taken together, these results revealed a step-wise assembly process for complex B, and showed that the complex first localizes to the proximal end of the centrioles and then translocates onto the transition fibers via an IFT88-dependent mechanism.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.