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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Increased serum type I interferon activity in organ-specific autoimmune disorders: clinical, imaging, and serological associations.
Front Immunol
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Background: Activation of the type I interferon (IFN) pathway has been implicated in the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune disorders but its role in the pathogenesis of organ-specific autoimmunity is limited. We tested the hypothesis that endogenous expression of type I IFN functional activity contributes to the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) and type I diabetes (T1DM). Methods: We studied 39 patients with ATD and 39 age and sex matched controls along with 88 T1DM patients and 46 healthy matched controls respectively. Available clinical and serological parameters were recorded by chart review, and thyroid ultrasound was performed in 17 ATD patients. Type I IFN serum activity was determined in all subjects using a reporter cell assay. The rs1990760 SNP of the interferon-induced helicase 1 gene was genotyped in ATD patients. Results: Serum type I IFN activity was increased in patients with ATD and T1DM compared to controls (p-values: 0.002 and 0.04, respectively). ATD patients with high type I IFN serum activity had increased prevalence of antibodies against thyroglobulin (anti-Tg) and cardiopulmonary manifestations compared to those with low IFN activity. Additionally, the presence of micronodules on thyroid ultrasound was associated with higher type I IFN levels. In patients with T1DM, high IFN levels were associated with increased apolipoprotein-B levels. Conclusion: Serum type I IFN activity is increased in ATD and T1DM and is associated with specific clinical, serological, and imaging features. These findings may implicate type I IFN pathway in the pathogenesis of specific features of organ-specific autoimmunity.
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Alterations in biomarkers of endothelial function following on-pump coronary artery revascularization.
J. Clin. Lab. Anal.
PUBLISHED: 11-20-2010
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Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) has been associated with activation and injury of endothelial cells, probably responsible for the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) taking place in these patients.
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The pattern of inflammatory/anti-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in type 1 diabetic patients over time.
Ann. Med.
PUBLISHED: 06-24-2010
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To evaluate the profile of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and the way they are connected in co-regulated networks and determine whether disease duration influences their pattern.
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The antioxidant effect of angiotensin II receptor blocker, losartan, in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.
Transl Res
PUBLISHED: 02-23-2010
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We determined the effect of a short-term angiotensin II signaling blockade on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), nitric oxide (NO), and malondialdehyde (MDA) (index of lipid peroxidation) levels in the systemic circulation and on peroxynitrite generation and insulitis development in the streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic rats pancreas. Diabetes was induced in Wistar rats by intraperitoneal STZ injection. Diabetic rats were treated for 1 week with losartan (20 mg/kg/body weight/day in the drinking water), and pancreas and blood were collected for histochemical, immunohistochemical, and biochemical studies. Diabetic rats showed greater VEGF, sICAM-1, NO, and MDA levels, a high score of insulitis, increased nitrotyrosine staining, and markedly reduced pancreatic insulin content when compared with controls. Losartan treatment suppressed the excessive NO and lipid peroxidation production systemically without restoring them to that of healthy subjects and reduced VEGF levels while leaving sICAM-1 levels unchanged. The insulitis score and nitrotyrosine staining were reduced, whereas the pancreatic islets and the beta-cell area were increased significantly in the treated group, indicating the reduction of inflammation and nitrosative stress and an early regeneration of beta-cell mass in the pancreas. Conclusively, in the STZ diabetic rat model, even a short-term losartan treatment improves oxidative and nitrosative stress systemically and locally, improving the islets environment and accelerating beta-cell regeneration.
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CD40/CD40L signaling and its implication in health and disease.
Biofactors
PUBLISHED: 11-12-2009
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CD40, a transmembrane receptor of the tumor necrosis factor gene superfamily is expressed on a variety of cells, such as monocytes, B-cells, antigen presenting cells, endothelial, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts. The interaction between CD40 and CD40 ligand (CD40L) enhances the expression of cytokines, chemokines, matrix metalloproteinases, growth factors, and adhesion molecules, mainly through the stimulation of nuclear factor kappa B. The aim of this review is to summarize the molecular and cellular characteristics of CD40 and CD40L, the mechanisms that regulate their expression, the cellular responses they stimulate and finally their implication in the pathophysiology of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.
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The use of animal models in the study of diabetes mellitus.
In Vivo
PUBLISHED: 05-06-2009
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Animal models have enormously contributed to the study of diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disease with abnormal glucose homeostasis, due to some defect in the secretion or the action of insulin. They give researchers the opportunity to control in vivo the genetic and environmental factors that may influence the development of the disease and establishment of its complications, and thus gain new information about its handling and treatment in humans. Most experiments are carried out on rodents, even though other species with human-like biological characteristics are also used. Animal models develop diabetes either spontaneously or by using chemical, surgical, genetic or other techniques, and depict many clinical features or related phenotypes of the disease. In this review, an overview of the most commonly used animal models of diabetes are provided, highlighting the advantages and limitations of each model, and discussing their usefulness and contribution in the field of diabetes research.
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Extracellular matrix-associated (GAGs, CTGF), angiogenic (VEGF) and inflammatory factors (MCP-1, CD40, IFN-?) in type 1 diabetes mellitus nephropathy.
Clin. Chem. Lab. Med.
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The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of extracellular matrix-associated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), angiogenic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and inflammatory factors (MCP-1, CD40, IFN-?) in the development of diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes (T1DM).
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.