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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Expectation-induced placebo responses fail to accelerate wound healing in healthy volunteers: results from a prospective controlled experimental trial.
Int Wound J
PUBLISHED: 08-15-2013
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Placebo responses have been shown to affect the symptomatology of skin diseases. However, expectation-induced placebo effects on wound healing processes have not been investigated yet. We analysed whether subjects expectation of receiving an active drug accelerates the healing process of experimentally induced wounds. In 22 healthy men (experimental group, n?=?11; control group, n?=?11) wounds were induced by ablative laser on both thighs. Using a deceptive paradigm, participants in the experimental group were informed that an innovative wound gel was applied on one of the two wounds, whereas a non-active gel was applied on the wound of the other thigh. In fact, both gels were identical hydrogels without any active components. A control group was informed to receive a non-active gel on both wounds. Progress in wound healing was documented via planimetry on days 1, 4 and 7 after wound induction. From day 9 onwards wound inspections were performed daily accompanied by a change of the dressing and a new application of the gel. No significant differences could be observed with regard to duration or process of wound healing, either by intraindividual or by interindividual comparisons. These data document no expectation-induced placebo effect on the healing process of experimentally induced wounds in healthy volunteers.
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Cognitive factors mediate placebo responses in patients with house dust mite allergy.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Placebo effects have been reported in type I allergic reactions. However the neuropsychological mechanisms steering placebo responses in allergies are largely unknown. The study analyzed whether and to what extend a conditioned placebo response is affecting type I allergic reactions and whether this response can be reproduced at multiple occasions.
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Behavioural conditioning as the mediator of placebo responses in the immune system.
Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond., B, Biol. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 05-18-2011
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Current placebo research postulates that conditioning processes are one of the major mechanisms of the placebo response. Behaviourally conditioned changes in peripheral immune functions have been demonstrated in experimental animals, healthy subjects and patients. The physiological mechanisms responsible for this learned immune response are not yet fully understood, but some relevant afferent and efferent pathways in the communication between the brain and the peripheral immune system have been identified. In addition, possible benefits and applicability in clinical settings have been demonstrated where behaviourally conditioned immunosuppression attenuated the exacerbation of autoimmune diseases, prolonged allograft survival and affected allergic responses. Here, we summarize data describing the mechanisms and the potential clinical benefit of behaviourally conditioned immune functions, with particular focus on learned placebo effects on allergic reactions.
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Smoking and obesity are associated factors in acne inversa: results of a retrospective investigation in 100 patients.
Eur J Dermatol
PUBLISHED: 06-15-2009
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Acne inversa is a chronic, recurring acneiform skin disease with inflammation of the follicular epithelium of the sebaceous glands and the terminal hair follicle. It primarily manifests in the intertriginous areas. So far, the aetiology of acne inversa is unknown. Smoking, amongst others, is being discussed and should be evaluated as a possible aetiological factor. In this study a retrospective investigation was carried out in 100 patients with acne inversa. The parameters; age, BMI, sex, weight, height, location of acne inversa, quantity of smoking, smoking behaviour and the date of initial diagnosis of acne inversa were considered. In most cases, the acne inversa is located in the axillary and inguinal areas. Overall, 96% of the 100 patients had a positive, long standing, on average almost 20-year, smoking history. On average, over 20 cigarettes are smoked daily. Over 50% of the patients are overweight. Merely 26.1% fall into the normal weight category. Our results suggest that especially smoking, but also obesity, may present an aetiologically relevant factor in the origin of acne inversa.
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Chronic leg ulcers as a rare cause for the first diagnosis of epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica.
Int Wound J
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Chronic leg ulcers occur most frequently in the elderly population as a result of an underlying vascular disease especially chronic venous insufficiency. But it also occurs less commonly in younger people due to other aetiologies, for example, infections, vasculitis, neoplasia or genetic diseases. The following case report presents chronic leg ulcers as a rare cause for the first diagnosis of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. We report about a 21-year-old man with painful chronic leg ulcers resistant to different wound treatments for 4 months. After exclusion of the more common vascular aetiologies and reviewing the patients family history, we considered an epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica which could be confirmed by genetic analyses. We treated the patient with debridement, modified negative pressure therapy with non adhesive foil and skin grafting. The chronic leg ulcers healed completely. This case report demonstrates that the family history and genetic diseases should be considered as rare causes for therapy-refractory chronic leg ulcers especially in young patients.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.