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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Guidelines for reporting case studies on extracorporeal treatments in poisonings: methodology.
Semin Dial
PUBLISHED: 05-29-2014
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A literature review performed by the EXtracorporeal TReatments In Poisoning (EXTRIP) workgroup highlighted deficiencies in the existing literature, especially the reporting of case studies. Although general reporting guidelines exist for case studies, there are none in the specific field of extracorporeal treatments in toxicology. Our goal was to construct and propose a checklist that systematically outlines the minimum essential items to be reported in a case study of poisoned patients undergoing extracorporeal treatments. Through a modified two-round Delphi technique, panelists (mostly chosen from the EXTRIP workgroup) were asked to vote on the pertinence of a set of items to identify those considered minimally essential for reporting complete and accurate case reports. Furthermore, independent raters validated the clarity of each selected items between each round of voting. All case reports containing data on extracorporeal treatments in poisoning published in Medline in 2011 were reviewed during the external validation rounds. Twenty-one panelists (20 from the EXTRIP workgroup and an invited expert on pharmacology reporting guidelines) participated in the modified Delphi technique. This group included journal editors and experts in nephrology, clinical toxicology, critical care medicine, emergency medicine, and clinical pharmacology. Three independent raters participated in the validation rounds. Panelists voted on a total of 144 items in the first round and 137 items in the second round, with response rates of 96.3% and 98.3%, respectively. Twenty case reports were evaluated at each validation round and the independent raters' response rate was 99.6% and 98.8% per validation round. The final checklist consists of 114 items considered essential for case study reporting. This methodology of alternate voting and external validation rounds was useful in developing the first reporting guideline for case studies in the field of extracorporeal treatments in poisoning. We believe that this guideline will improve the completeness and transparency of published case reports and that the systematic aggregation of information from case reports may provide early signals of effectiveness and/or harm, thereby improving healthcare decision-making.
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Prostatic surgery associated acute kidney injury.
World J Nephrol
PUBLISHED: 05-28-2014
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Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with extended hospital stays, high risks of in-hospital and long-term mortality, and increased risk of incident and progressive chronic kidney disease. Patients with urological diseases are a high-risk group for AKI owing to the coexistence of obstructive uropathy, older age, and preexistent chronic kidney disease. Nonetheless, precise data on the incidence and outcomes of postoperative AKI in urological procedures are lacking. Benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer are common diagnoses in older men and are frequently treated with surgical procedures. Whereas severe AKI after prostate surgery in general appears to be unusual, AKI associated with transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) syndrome and with rhabdomyolysis (RM) after radical prostatectomy have been frequently described. The purpose of this review is to discuss the current knowledge regarding the epidemiology, risk factors, outcomes, prevention, and treatment of AKI associated with prostatic surgery. The mechanisms of TURP syndrome and RM following prostatic surgeries will be emphasized.
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Acute kidney injury in Latin America: a view on renal replacement therapy resources.
Nephrol. Dial. Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 04-16-2014
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Acute kidney injury (AKI) has increasingly been recognized as an important public health issue due to its rising frequency, its associations with early and late adverse outcomes and its economic burden.
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Burnt sugarcane harvesting is associated with acute renal dysfunction.
Kidney Int.
PUBLISHED: 03-27-2014
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Sugarcane harvesting has been associated with an epidemic of chronic kidney disease in Central America mainly affecting previously healthy young workers. Repeated episodes of acute kidney dysfunction are hypothesized to be one of the possible mechanisms for this phenomenon. Therefore, this exploratory study aimed to assess the acute effects of burnt sugarcane harvesting on renal function among 28 healthy non-African Brazilian workers. Urine and blood samples were collected at the beginning and at the end of the harvesting season and before and at the end of a harvesting workday. All individuals decreased their estimated glomerular filtration rate by ?20% at the end of the daily shift, and 18.5% presented with serum creatinine increases consistent with acute kidney injury. Those changes were associated with increased serum creatine phosphokinase (a known marker for exertional rhabdomyolysis) and oxidative stress-associated malondialdehyde levels, increased peripheral blood white cell counts, decreased urinary and serum sodium, decreased calculated fractional sodium excretion, and increased urine density. Thus, burnt sugarcane harvesting caused acute renal dysfunction in previously healthy workers. This was associated with a combination of dehydration, systemic inflammation, oxidative stress, and rhabdomyolysis.Kidney International advance online publication, 17 September 2014; doi:10.1038/ki.2014.306.
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Biopsy proven acute tubular necrosis due to rhabdomyolysis in a dengue fever patient: a case report and review of literature.
Rev. Inst. Med. Trop. Sao Paulo
PUBLISHED: 02-21-2014
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Renal histology results are very scarce in dengue-associated rhabdomyolysis patients developing acute kidney injury (AKI). We report a case of dengue fever-induced AKI associated to rhabdomyolysis with a renal biopsy showing acute tubular necrosis (ATN) and renal deposition of myoglobin. A 28-year-old patient who presented dengue fever (DF) complicated by severe AKI and rhabdomyolysis is described. The patient required hemodialysis for three weeks. A renal biopsy revealed ATN with positive staining for myoglobin in the renal tubuli. The patient was discharged with recovered renal function. In conclusion, this case report described a biopsy proven ATN associated to DF-induced rhabdomyolysis, in which renal deposition of myoglobin was demonstrated. We suggest that serum creatine phosphokinase should be monitored in DF patients to allow for an early diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis and the institution of renal protective measures.
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Water balance, acute kidney injury and mortality of intensive care unit patients.
J Bras Nefrol
PUBLISHED: 02-12-2014
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Acute kidney injury (AKI) has a high hospital incidence and is associated to significant morbidity and mortality. Sepsis, major surgery and low cardiac output are the main cause of AKI worldwide. In the majority of these situations, volume expansion is part of both prevention and therapeutic management, restoring peripheral perfusion and attenuating drug nephrotoxicity. Early and aggressive volume resuscitation in septic patients halts tissue ischemia and is associated with higher survival. However, a liberal fluid infusion strategy after six hours can cause fluid overload. Fluid overload has been associated with morbidity and mortality increase in critically ill patients. Herein, we present a review of the main studies that assessed the effects of net fluid balance/fluid overload on the morbidity and mortality of critically ill patients. We suggest that positive water balance may be used as a potential early biomarker of AKI in these patients.
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Predictive usefulness of urinary biomarkers for the identification of cyclosporine A-induced nephrotoxicity in a rat model.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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The main side effect of cyclosporine A (CsA), a widely used immunosuppressive drug, is nephrotoxicity. Early detection of CsA-induced acute nephrotoxicity is essential for stop or minimize kidney injury, and timely detection of chronic nephrotoxicity is critical for halting the drug and preventing irreversible kidney injury. This study aimed to identify urinary biomarkers for the detection of CsA-induced nephrotoxicity. We allocated salt-depleted rats to receive CsA or vehicle for 7, 14 or 21 days and evaluated renal function and hemodynamics, microalbuminuria, renal macrophage infiltration, tubulointerstitial fibrosis and renal tissue and urinary biomarkers for kidney injury. Kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?), interleukin 6 (IL-6), fibronectin, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), TGF-?, osteopontin, and podocin were assessed in urine. TNF-?, IL-6, fibronectin, osteopontin, TGF-?, collagen IV, alpha smooth muscle actin (? -SMA) and vimentin were assessed in renal tissue. CsA caused early functional renal dysfunction and microalbuminuria, followed by macrophage infiltration and late tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Urinary TNF-?, KIM-1 and fibronectin increased in the early phase, and urinary TGF-? and osteopontin increased in the late phase of CsA nephrotoxicity. Urinary biomarkers correlated consistently with renal tissue cytokine expression. In conclusion, early increases in urinary KIM-1, TNF-?, and fibronectin and elevated microalbuminuria indicate acute CsA nephrotoxicity. Late increases in urinary osteopontin and TGF-? indicate chronic CsA nephrotoxicity. These urinary kidney injury biomarkers correlated well with the renal tissue expression of injury markers and with the temporal development of CsA nephrotoxicity.
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Effects of Schizolobium parahyba extract on experimental Bothrops venom-induced acute kidney injury.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Venom-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent complication of Bothrops snakebite with relevant morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of Schizolobium parahyba (SP) extract, a natural medicine with presumed anti-Bothrops venom effects, in an experimental model of Bothrops jararaca venom (BV)-induced AKI.
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Acute kidney injury: global health alert.
Arab J Nephrol Transplant
PUBLISHED: 06-26-2013
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Acute kidney injury (AKI) is increasingly prevalent in developing and developed countries and is associated with severe morbidity and mortality. Most etiologies of AKI can be prevented by interventions at the individual, community, regional and in-hospital levels. Effective measures must include community-wide efforts to increase an awareness of the devastating effects of AKI and provide guidance on preventive strategies, as well as early recognition and management. Efforts should be focused on minimizing causes of AKI, increasing awareness of the importance of serial measurements of serum creatinine in high risk patients, and documenting urine volume in acutely ill people to achieve early diagnosis; there is as yet no definitive role for alternative biomarkers. Protocols need to be developed to systematically manage prerenal conditions and specific infections. More accurate data about the true incidence and clinical impact of AKI will help to raise the importance of the disease in the community, increase awareness of AKI by governments, the public, general and family physicians and other health care professionals to help prevent the disease. Prevention is the key to avoid the heavy burden of mortality and morbidity associated with AKI.
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[Acute kidney injury: a global alert].
J Bras Nefrol
PUBLISHED: 04-20-2013
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Acute kidney injury (AKI) is increasingly prevalent in developing and developed countries and is associated with severe morbidity and mortality. Most etiologies of AKI can be prevented by interventions at the individual, community, regional and in-hospital levels. Effective measures must include community-wide efforts to increase an awareness of the devastating effects of AKI and provide guidance on preventive strategies, as well as early recognition and management. Efforts should be focused on minimizing causes of AKI, increasing awareness of the importance of serial measurements of serum creatinine in high risk patients, and documenting urine volume in acutely ill people to achieve early diagnosis; there is as yet no definitive role for alternative biomarkers. Protocols need to be developed to systematically manage prerenal conditions and specific infections. More accurate data about the true incidence and clinical impact of AKI will help to raise the importance of the disease in the community, increase awareness of AKI by governments, the public, general and family physicians and other health care professionals to help prevent the disease. Prevention is the key to avoid the heavy burden of mortality and morbidity associated with AKI.
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Acute kidney injury: global health alert.
Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl
PUBLISHED: 03-30-2013
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Acute kidney injury (AKI) is increasingly prevalent in developing and developed countries and is associated with severe morbidity and mortality. Most etiologies of AKI can be prevented by interventions at the individual, community, regional and in-hospital levels. Effective measures must include community-wide efforts to increase an awareness of the devastating effects of AKI and provide guidance on preventive strategies, as well as early recognition and management. Efforts should be focused on minimizing causes of AKI, increasing awareness of the importance of serial measurements of serum creatinine in high risk patients, and documenting urine volume in acutely ill people to achieve early diagnosis; there is as yet no definitive role for alternative biomarkers. Protocols need to be developed to systematically manage prerenal conditions and specific infections. More accurate data about the true incidence and clinical impact of AKI will help to raise the importance of the disease in the community, increase awareness of AKI by governments, the public, general and family physicians and other health care professionals to help prevent the disease. Prevention is the key to avoid the heavy burden of mortality and morbidity associated with AKI.
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Acute kidney injury: global health alert.
Transplantation
PUBLISHED: 03-19-2013
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Acute kidney injury (AKI) is increasingly prevalent in developing and developed countries and is associated with severe morbidity and mortality. Most etiologies of AKI can be prevented by interventions at the individual, community, regional, and in-hospital levels. Effective measures must include community-wide efforts to increase an awareness of the devastating effects of AKI and provide guidance on preventive strategies, and early recognition and management. Efforts should be focused on minimizing the causes of AKI, increasing awareness of the importance of serial measurements of serum creatinine in high-risk patients, and documenting urine volume in acutely ill people to achieve early diagnosis; there is as yet no definitive role for alternative biomarkers. Protocols need to be developed to systematically manage prerenal conditions and specific infections. More accurate data about the true incidence and clinical impact of AKI will help raise the importance of the disease in the community and increase awareness of AKI by governments, the public, and general and family physicians and other health care professionals to help prevent the disease. Prevention is the key to avoid the heavy burden of mortality and morbidity associated with AKI.
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Acute kidney injury: global health alert.
Kidney Int.
PUBLISHED: 01-09-2013
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Acute kidney injury (AKI) is increasingly prevalent in developing and developed countries and is associated with severe morbidity and mortality. Most etiologies of AKI can be prevented by interventions at the individual, community, regional, and in-hospital levels. Effective measures must include community-wide efforts to increase an awareness of the devastating effects of AKI and provide guidance on preventive strategies, as well as early recognition and management. Efforts should be focused on minimizing causes of AKI, increasing awareness of the importance of serial measurements of serum creatinine in high-risk patients, and documenting urine volume in acutely ill people to achieve early diagnosis; there is as yet no definitive role for alternative biomarkers. Protocols need to be developed to systematically manage prerenal conditions and specific infections. More accurate data about the true incidence and clinical impact of AKI will help to raise the importance of the disease in the community, increase awareness of AKI by governments, the public, general and family physicians, and other health-care professionals to help prevent the disease. Prevention is the key to avoid the heavy burden of mortality and morbidity associated with AKI.
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Incidence and mortality of acute kidney injury after myocardial infarction: a comparison between KDIGO and RIFLE criteria.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Acute kidney injury (AKI) increases the risk of death after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Recently, a new AKI definition was proposed by the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) organization. The aim of the current study was to compare the incidence and the early and late mortality of AKI diagnosed by RIFLE and KDIGO criteria in the first 7 days of hospitalization due to an AMI.
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Stroke in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and anemia treated with Darbepoetin Alfa: the trial to reduce cardiovascular events with Aranesp therapy (TREAT) experience.
Circulation
PUBLISHED: 11-21-2011
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More strokes were observed in the Trial to Reduce Cardiovascular Events With Aranesp Therapy (TREAT) among patients assigned to darbepoetin alfa. We sought to identify baseline characteristics and postrandomization factors that might explain this association.
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Annexin A1 protein attenuates cyclosporine-induced renal hemodynamics changes and macrophage infiltration in rats.
Inflamm. Res.
PUBLISHED: 09-03-2011
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Cyclosporine (CsA) remains an important immunosuppressant for transplantation and for treatment of autoimmune diseases. The most troublesome side effect of CsA is renal injury. Acute CsA-induced nephrotoxicity is characterized by reduced renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) due to afferent arteriole vasoconstriction. Annexin A1 (ANXA1) is a potent anti-inflammatory protein with protective effect in renal ischemia/reperfusion injury. Here we study the effects of ANXA1 treatment in an experimental model of acute CsA nephrotoxicity.
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Acute kidney injury caused by bothrops snake venom.
Nephron Clin Pract
PUBLISHED: 07-08-2011
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Medically important venomous snakes in Latin America belong to the genus Bothrops, Crotalus, Lachesis and Micrurus. The Bothrops genus is responsible for the majority of accidents. The WHO globally estimates 2,500,000 poisonous snakebites and 125,000 deaths annually. In its last report in 2001, the Brazilian Ministry of Health accounted 359 deaths due to snakebites, of which the Bothrops genus was responsible for 185. Snake venoms cause local and systemic damage, including acute kidney injury, which is the most important cause of death among patients surviving the early effects of envenoming by the Crotalus and Bothrops genuses. Venom-induced acute kidney injury is a frequent complication of Bothrops snakebite, carrying relevant morbidity and mortality.
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Peritoneal dialysis in acute kidney injury: lessons learned and applied.
Semin Dial
PUBLISHED: 04-27-2011
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Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is a simple, safe, gentle, and efficient renal replacement therapy (RRT) method. It is able to correct acute kidney injury (AKI)-induced metabolic, electrolytic, and acid-base disorders and volume overload both in and out the intensive care unit setting. Some PD modalities, such as high-volume PD and continuous flow PD, can provide RRT doses and efficiency comparable to extracorporeal blood purification methods. PD is particularly suitable for children, patients with refractory heart failure or hemodynamically instable, conditions where systemic anticoagulation should be avoided, patients with difficulty for vascular access and hypo- and hyperthermia conditions. In the following manuscript, PD technical aspects and the possible advantages and limitations of this RRT method will be discussed, and the more recent literature on clinical experience with PD for treatment of AKI will be reviewed.
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Loxosceles gaucho venom-induced acute kidney injury--in vivo and in vitro studies.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis
PUBLISHED: 04-16-2011
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Accidents caused by Loxosceles spider may cause severe systemic reactions, including acute kidney injury (AKI). There are few experimental studies assessing Loxosceles venom effects on kidney function in vivo.
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The effects of so-called forbidden acupuncture points on pregnancy outcome in wistar rats.
Forsch Komplementmed
PUBLISHED: 01-31-2011
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This study sought to determine if acupuncture in LI4 and SP6, or in sacral points could harm the pregnancy outcome in Wistar rats as is believed according to traditional knowledge.
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Glomerular deposition of immune complexes as a first manifestation of malignant melanoma - a case report.
Ren Fail
PUBLISHED: 10-20-2010
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Immune complex (IC) deposition in renal tissue is considered as a possible tumor marker. This raised the hypothesis that some tumor markers might be related to the patient prognosis, with emphasis in the possibility to detect them in tissue sample, not only in blood. We report a patient with membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN) and tumoral IC deposition that were detected previous to the diagnosis of melanoma.
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Strategies of the Brazilian chronic kidney disease prevention campaign (2003-2009).
Nephron Clin Pract
PUBLISHED: 09-17-2010
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In Brazil, as in the rest of the world, the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasing. In order to alert the population, health professionals and authorities to this risk, in 2003, the Brazilian Society of Nephrology launched a CKD prevention campaign called Previna-se. In addition, since its onset, Brazil has participated in the World Kidney Day efforts and has developed several prevention strategies. Here, we summarize the main strategies adopted in this campaign (population screening, events and meetings, distribution of educational materials, routine report of estimated glomerular filtration rate) and our initial results, sharing practical experience that could be useful in other developing countries.
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Erythropoietic response and outcomes in kidney disease and type 2 diabetes.
N. Engl. J. Med.
PUBLISHED: 09-17-2010
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Non–placebo-controlled trials of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) comparing lower and higher hemoglobin targets in patients with chronic kidney disease indicate that targeting of a lower hemoglobin range may avoid ESA-associated risks. However, target-based strategies are confounded by each patients individual hematopoietic response.
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Brazilian dialysis census, 2009.
J Bras Nefrol
PUBLISHED: 08-23-2010
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National dialysis data are fundamental for treatment planning.
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Renal glomerular alterations in patients with cancer: a clinical and immunohistochemical autopsy study.
Ren Fail
PUBLISHED: 08-21-2010
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Membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN) can be found in patients with cancer as a paraneoplastic syndrome or it could be manifested clinically before tumor detection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency and type of renal histopathological alterations in patients with malignancy that died without cancer treatment and were submitted to necropsy.
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Effect of kidney disease on acute coronary syndrome.
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol
PUBLISHED: 06-24-2010
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Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is highly prevalent worldwide and is associated with an increased risk for adverse outcomes in patients hospitalized with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). In studies including thousands of patients admitted with myocardial infarction, CKD consistently determines a poorer prognosis for ACS patients. In contrast with CKD, information about the effect of acute kidney injury (AKI) on clinical outcomes after ACS is limited. Most data come from retrospective registry databank studies of nonconsecutive patients with a significant number of patients excluded from analyses. There are no prospective studies designed to determine whether AKI strictly diagnosed by the new the Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) or RIFLE (Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, and End-stage kidney disease) criteria is a risk factor for death after ACS, and there are no data comparing the RIFLE and AKIN criteria for AKI diagnosis after myocardial infarction. This article reviews the most important data on CKD and ACS and the available data on AKI and ACS. The importance of obtaining an early serum creatinine level after admission for ACS and the importance of renal function monitoring during hospitalization are stressed.
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Prevention of contrast-induced nephropathy by use of bicarbonate solution: preliminary results and literature review.
J Bras Nefrol
PUBLISHED: 06-20-2010
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The incidence of contrast-induced nephropathy has increased simultaneously with the increase in contrast medium use in diagnostic and interventional procedures. The incidence of contrast-induced nephropathy in the general population is low, but increases exponentially in patients with risk factors, such as diabetes and chronic kidney disease. Several strategies have been used in order to prevent contrast-induced nephropathy. The most efficient strategies are saline hydration (0.9% or 0.45%), use of low-or iso-osmolality contrast medium, and sodium bicarbonate infusion.
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Macrophage depletion attenuates chronic cyclosporine A nephrotoxicity.
Transplantation
PUBLISHED: 06-11-2010
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Cyclosporine A (CsA)-induced chronic nephrotoxicity is characterized by renal dysfunction and interstitial fibrosis. Early and progressive renal macrophage influx, correlating with latter interstitial fibrotic areas, has been associated with CsA treatment. This study investigated the role of macrophages, the nitric oxide (NO) pathway, and the oxidative stress on chronic CsA nephrotoxicity.
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Annexin 1 mimetic peptide protects against renal ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats.
J. Mol. Med.
PUBLISHED: 06-07-2010
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Inflammation is currently recognized as a key mechanism in the pathogenesis of renal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. The importance of infiltrating neutrophil, lymphocytes, and macrophage in this kind of injury has been assessed with conflicting results. Annexin 1 is a protein with potent neutrophil anti-migratory activity. In order to evaluate the effects of annexin A1 on renal I/R injury, uninephrectomized rats received annexin A1 mimetic peptide Ac2-26 (100 ?g) or vehicle before 30 min of renal artery clamping and were compared to sham surgery animals. Annexin A1 mimetic peptide granted a remarkable protection against I/R injury, preventing glomerular filtration rate and urinary osmolality decreases and acute tubular necrosis development. Annexin A1 infusion aborted neutrophil extravasation and attenuated macrophage infiltration but did not prevent tissue lymphocyte traffic. I/R increased annexin A1 expression (assessed by transmission electron microscopy) in renal epithelial cells, which was attenuated by exogenous annexin A1 infusion. Additionally, annexin A1 reduced I/R injury in isolated proximal tubules suspension. Annexin A1 protein afforded striking functional and structural protection against renal I/R. These results point to an important role of annexin A1 in the epithelial cells defense against I/R injury and indicate that neutrophils are key mediators for the development of tissue injury after renal I/R. If these results were confirmed in clinical studies, annexin A1 might emerge as an important tool to protect against I/R injury in renal transplantation and in vascular surgery.
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Interaction of the anti-inflammatory annexin A1 protein and tacrolimus immunosuppressant in the renal function of rats.
Am. J. Nephrol.
PUBLISHED: 03-27-2010
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Tacrolimus (FK) is currently widely used in transplant immunosuppression and the treatment of autoimmune diseases. However, FK induces nephrotoxicity which is characterized by functional and structural renal injury. The ubiquitous protein annexin A1 (ANXA1) has potent anti-inflammatory effects and protects against ischemia/reperfusion injury. We investigated the effects of exogenous ANXA1 treatment in an experimental model of acute FK nephrotoxicity.
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Ga-67 scintigraphy in the differential diagnosis between acute interstitial nephritis and acute tubular necrosis: an experimental study.
Nephrol. Dial. Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 03-26-2010
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The differentiation between acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) and acute tubular necrosis (ATN) is crucial in patients with acute kidney injury. Gallium-67 citrate (Ga-67) has been used clinically in the differential diagnosis between these entities, but its efficacy is disputed. The aim of this study was to evaluate Ga-67 scintigraphy efficacy in the differentiation between experimental models of drug-induced AIN and ATN.
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[Hypertension prevalence and risk factors in a Brazilian urban population].
Arq. Bras. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 03-26-2010
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The available studies have not fully analyzed the several factors involved in the genesis of hypertension (HT), especially the association among blood pressure, urinary sodium excretion and renal dysfunction.
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Urine volume in acute kidney injury: how much is enough?
Ren Fail
PUBLISHED: 12-25-2009
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Eight hundred and seventy-nine patients with acute kidney injury were retrospectively studied over year and eleven months for evaluation of urine volume as a risk factor for death. They were divided into five groups, according to the 24 h urine volume (UV): anuric (UV 50 mL/24 h and < 400 mL/24 h, group 2), and non-oliguric (UV >or= 400 mL/24 h). Nonoliguric group was subdivided in three subgroups: UV > 400 mL/24 h and 1000 mL/24 h and 2000 mL/24 h (group 5). Linear tendency test (Mantel extension) pointed out a significant increase in mortality with UV decrease (p < 0.001), confirmed by multivariate analysis. Anuric and oliguric patients had increased risk of respectively 95% and 76% times for death compared to controls (p < 0.05). Patients from groups 4 and 5 presented a reduced risk for death of 50% and 70%, respectively, p = 0.004 and p = 0.001. In conclusion, urine volume was a strong independent factor for mortality in this cohort of AKI patients.
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Prevalence and risk factors for acute kidney injury associated with parenteral polymyxin B use.
Ann Pharmacother
PUBLISHED: 11-03-2009
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The main adverse effect of polymyxin B is nephrotoxicity. There are few data on polymyxin-associated renal injury.
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A trial of darbepoetin alfa in type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease.
N. Engl. J. Med.
PUBLISHED: 10-30-2009
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Anemia is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and renal events among patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease. Although darbepoetin alfa can effectively increase hemoglobin levels, its effect on clinical outcomes in these patients has not been adequately tested.
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[Polymyxins - review with emphasis on nephrotoxicity].
Rev Assoc Med Bras
PUBLISHED: 07-17-2009
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Polymyxins are polypeptide antibiotics with strong action against Gram-negative bacteria. Their use was almost halted between 1970 and 1980 due to the launching of less toxic compounds. The emergence of multiresistant Gram-negative bacterial strains, mainly in patients hospitalized in intensive care units, and the absence of new antimicrobials effective against these pathogens, renewed interest in polymyxins in recent years. The major adverse effect of this class of antibiotics is nephrotoxicity. Currently, only polymyxins B and E are used in clinical practice. Polymyxin E, the compound more employed and studied, is known as colistin and is used in the form of sodium colistimethate, for the purpose of reducing its nephrotoxicity. There is no consistent data about prevalence of renal injury associated with use of the polymyxins or about the risk factors to develop nephrotoxicity with these antibiotics. The aim of this manuscript is to review the main aspects of polymyxin pharmacodynamics, to provide a better understanding about the mechanism of renal injury associated with them and to compare the different prevalences of renal injury described with the use of these antibiotics.
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Evaluation of the awareness, control and cost-effectiveness of hypertension treatment in a Brazilian city: populational study.
J. Hypertens.
PUBLISHED: 07-10-2009
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Hypertension is a highly prevalent disease worldwide, constituting one of the main risk factors for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The aims of this study were to evaluate the level of awareness and control of hypertension comparing sex, socioeconomic and educational level, BMI and drug therapy in over 40-year-old patients. The cost-effectiveness of the main pharmacologic classes of antihypertensives, as monotherapy and combination therapy, was also assessed.
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Prevalence and risk factors for aminoglycoside nephrotoxicity in intensive care units.
Antimicrob. Agents Chemother.
PUBLISHED: 04-13-2009
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In order to assess the prevalence of and risk factors for aminoglycoside-associated nephrotoxicity in intensive care units (ICUs), we evaluated 360 consecutive patients starting aminoglycoside therapy in an ICU. The patients had a baseline calculated glomerular filtration rate (cGFR) of > or =30 ml/min/1.73 m(2). Among these patients, 209 (58%) developed aminoglycoside-associated nephrotoxicity (the acute kidney injury [AKI] group, which consisted of individuals with a decrease in cGFR of >20% from the baseline cGFR), while 151 did not (non-AKI group). Both groups had similar baseline cGFRs. The AKI group developed a lower cGFR nadir (45 +/- 27 versus 79 +/- 39 ml/min/1.73 m(2) for the non-AKI group; P < 0.001); was older (56 +/- 18 years versus 52 +/- 19 years for the non-AKI group; P = 0.033); had a higher prevalence of diabetes (19.6% versus 9.3% for the non-AKI group; P = 0.007); was more frequently treated with other nephrotoxic drugs (51% versus 38% for the non-AKI group; P = 0.024); used iodinated contrast more frequently (18% versus 8% for the non-AKI group; P = 0.0054); and showed a higher prevalence of hypotension (63% versus 44% for the non-AKI group; P = 0.0003), shock (56% versus 31% for the non-AKI group; P < 0.0001), and jaundice (19% versus 8% for the non-AKI group; P = 0.0036). The mortality rate was 44.5% for the AKI group and 29.1% for the non-AKI group (P = 0.0031). A logistic regression model identified as significant (P < 0.05) the following independent factors that affected aminoglycoside-associated nephrotoxicity: a baseline cGFR of <60 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (odds ratio [OR], 0.42), diabetes (OR, 2.13), treatment with other nephrotoxins (OR, 1.61) or iodinated contrast (OR, 2.13), and hypotension (OR, 1.83). In conclusion, AKI was frequent among ICU patients receiving an aminoglycoside, and it was associated with a high rate of mortality. The presence of diabetes or hypotension and the use of other nephrotoxic drugs and iodinated contrast were independent risk factors for the development of aminoglycoside-associated nephrotoxicity.
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Baseline characteristics in the Trial to Reduce Cardiovascular Events With Aranesp Therapy (TREAT).
Am. J. Kidney Dis.
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2009
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Anemia augments the already high rates of fatal and major nonfatal cardiovascular and renal events in individuals with type 2 diabetes. In 2004, we initiated the Trial to Reduce Cardiovascular Events With Aranesp Therapy (TREAT). This report presents the baseline characteristics and therapies of TREAT participants and subgroups defined by the presence or absence of overt proteinuria and history of cardiovascular disease. The design of TREAT and baseline characteristics also are compared with 2 recent trials of nondialysis patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in which treatment with another erythropoiesis-stimulating agent targeting greater hemoglobin levels had either a neutral or adverse effect on clinical outcomes.
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Previous exposure to cigarette smoke aggravates experimental cyclosporine-induced nephrotoxicity.
Am. J. Nephrol.
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The effects of cigarette smoke (CS) on cyclosporine (CsA)-induced nephrotoxicity are poorly studied. This study aims to assess the effects of previous exposure to CS on CsA nephrotoxicity.
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Prevention of intradialytic hypotension in patients with acute kidney injury submitted to sustained low-efficiency dialysis.
Ren Fail
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This study evaluated the effects of a protocol aiming to reduce hypotension in acute kidney injury (AKI) patients submitted to sustained low-efficiency dialysis (SLED).
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Extracorporeal treatment for thallium poisoning: recommendations from the EXTRIP Workgroup.
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol
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The EXtracorporeal TReatments In Poisoning (EXTRIP) workgroup was formed to provide recommendations on the use of extracorporeal treatment (ECTR) in poisoning. To test and validate its methods, the workgroup reviewed data for thallium (Tl).
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Hypomagnesemia as a risk factor for the non-recovery of the renal function in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury.
Nephrol. Dial. Transplant.
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The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of hypomagnesemia as a risk factor for the development of acute kidney injury (AKI) and non-recovery of renal function in critically ill patients.
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The EXTRIP (EXtracorporeal TReatments In Poisoning) workgroup: guideline methodology.
Clin Toxicol (Phila)
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Extracorporeal treatments (ECTRs), such as hemodialysis and hemoperfusion, are used in poisoning despite a lack of controlled human trials demonstrating efficacy. To provide uniform recommendations, the EXTRIP group was formed as an international collaboration among recognized experts from nephrology, clinical toxicology, critical care, or pharmacology and supported by over 30 professional societies. For every poison, the clinical benefit of ECTR is weighed against associated complications, alternative therapies, and costs. Rigorous methodology, using the AGREE instrument, was developed and ratified. Methods rely on evidence appraisal and, in the absence of robust studies, on a thorough and transparent process of consensus statements. Twenty-four poisons were chosen according to their frequency, available evidence, and relevance. A systematic literature search was performed in order to retrieve all original publications regardless of language. Data were extracted on a standardized instrument. Quality of the evidence was assessed by GRADE as: High = A, Moderate = B, Low = C, Very Low = D. For every poison, dialyzability was assessed and clinical effect of ECTR summarized. All pertinent documents were submitted to the workgroup with a list of statements for vote (general statement, indications, timing, ECTR choice). A modified Delphi method with two voting rounds was used, between which deliberation was required. Each statement was voted on a Likert scale (1-9) to establish the strength of recommendation. This approach will permit the production of the first important practice guidelines on this topic.
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Renal function at hospital admission and mortality due to acute kidney injury after myocardial infarction.
PLoS ONE
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The role of an impaired estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at hospital admission in the outcome of acute kidney injury (AKI) after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has been underreported. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of an admission eGFR<60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) on the incidence and early and late mortality of AMI-associated AKI.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.