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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Pediatric secondary chronic myeloid leukemia following cardiac transplantation for anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy.
Pediatr Blood Cancer
PUBLISHED: 08-31-2014
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Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a clonal myeloproliferative disorder of the hematopoietic stem cell that is exceptionally rare in the first five years of life, particularly as a secondary malignancy. This report describes a case of secondary CML in a four-year-old female occurring after AML treatment. Interestingly, CML developed while on immunosuppression for a heart transplant due to anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2015;62:166-168. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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Outcomes after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for children with I-cell disease.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 05-13-2014
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Mucolipidosis type II (MLII), or I-cell disease, is a rare but severe disorder affecting localization of enzymes to the lysosome, generally resulting in death before the 10th birthday. Although hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been used to successfully treat some lysosomal storage diseases, only 2 cases have been reported on the use of HSCT to treat MLII. For the first time, we describe the combined international experience in the use of HSCT for MLII in 22 patients. Although 95% of the patients engrafted, overall survival was low, with only 6 patients (27%) alive at last follow-up. The most common cause of death post-transplant was cardiovascular complications, most likely due to disease progression. Survivors were globally delayed in development and often required complex medical support, such as gastrostomy tubes for nutrition and tracheostomy with mechanical ventilation. Although HSCT has demonstrated efficacy in treating some lysosomal storage disorders, the neurologic outcome and survival for patents with MLII were poor. Therefore, new medical and cellular therapies should be sought for these patients.
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PIAS1 and STAT-3 impair the tumoricidal potential of IFN-?-stimulated mouse dendritic cells generated with IL-15.
Eur. J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 04-04-2014
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Primarily defined by their antigen-presenting property, dendritic cells (DCs) are being implemented as cancer vaccines in immunotherapeutic interventions. DCs can also function as direct tumor cell killers. How DC cytotoxic activity can be efficiently harnessed and the mechanisms controlling this nonconventional property are not fully understood. We report here that the tumoricidal potential of mouse DCs generated from myeloid precursors with GM-CSF and IL-15 (IL-15 DCs) can be triggered with the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 ligand lipopolysaccharide to a similar extent compared with that of their counterparts, conventionally generated with IL-4 (IL-4 DCs). The mechanism of tumor cell killing depends on the induction of iNOS expression by DCs. In contrast, interferon (IFN)-? induces the cytotoxic activity of IL-4 but not IL-15 DCs. Although the IFN-?-STAT-1 signaling pathway is overall functional in IL-15 DCs, IFN-? fails to induce iNOS expression in these cells. iNOS expression is negatively controlled in IFN-?-stimulated IL-15 DCs by the cooperation between the E3 SUMO ligase PIAS1 and STAT-3, and can be partially restored with PIAS1 siRNA and STAT-3 inhibitors.
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Chemotherapeutic targeting of myeloid-derived suppressor cells.
Oncoimmunology
PUBLISHED: 03-22-2014
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Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), which expand in cancer-bearing hosts, contribute to the escape of malignant cells from immune destruction and impair the efficacy of immunotherapeutic interventions. We have recently demonstrated that the conventional chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin selectively eliminates MDSCs, hence promoting the activity of immune effector cells and improving the therapeutic profile of adoptively transferred helper T lymphocytes.
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Treatment of hepatoblastoma with high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell rescue: the pediatric blood and marrow transplant consortium experience and review of the literature.
J. Pediatr. Hematol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 03-01-2014
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Children with high-risk or relapsed hepatoblastoma continue to represent treatment challenges. Multiple case reports have documented the use of high-dose chemotherapy with stem cell rescue (HDC) for this population; however, the efficacy and appropriate use of HDC remains unclear.
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Doxorubicin Eliminates Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells and Enhances the Efficacy of Adoptive T-Cell Transfer in Breast Cancer.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 11-06-2013
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Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) expand in tumor-bearing hosts and play a central role in cancer immune evasion by inhibiting adaptive and innate immunity. They therefore represent a major obstacle for successful cancer immunotherapy. Different strategies have thus been explored to deplete and/or inactivate MDSC in vivo. Using a murine mammary cancer model, we demonstrated that doxorubicin selectively eliminates MDSC in the spleen, blood, and tumor beds. Furthermore, residual MDSC from doxorubicin-treated mice exhibited impaired suppressive function. Importantly, the frequency of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes and consequently the effector lymphocytes or natural killer (NK) to suppressive MDSC ratios were significantly increased following doxorubicin treatment of tumor-bearing mice. In addition, the proportion of NK and cytotoxic T cell (CTL) expressing perforin and granzyme B and of CTL producing IFN-? was augmented by doxorubicin administration. Of therapeutic relevance, this drug efficiently combined with Th1 or Th17 lymphocytes to suppress tumor development and metastatic disease. MDSC isolated from patients with different types of cancer were also sensitive to doxorubicin-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro. These results thus indicate that doxorubicin may be used not only as a direct cytotoxic drug against tumor cells, but also as a potent immunomodulatory agent that selectively impairs MDSC-induced immunosuppression, thereby fostering the efficacy of T-cell-based immunotherapy. Cancer Res; 74(1); 1-15. ©2013 AACR.
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Prolonged remission of advanced bronchoalveolar adenocarcinoma in a dog treated with autologous, tumour-derived chaperone-rich cell lysate (CRCL) vaccine.
Int J Hyperthermia
PUBLISHED: 06-20-2013
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This paper presents the treatment of a 12-year-old female spayed Great Dane who presented with vestibular signs (ataxia, nystagmus, hind end collapse). Thoracic radiographs revealed a discrete pulmonary nodule in the right cranial lung lobe. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspirate detected primary bronchoalveolar adenocarcinoma, verified via computed tomography, with a second smaller nodule discovered in the right cranial lung lobe.
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The peptidome of tumour-derived chaperone-rich cell lysate anti-cancer vaccines reveals potential tumour antigens that stimulate tumour immunity.
Int J Hyperthermia
PUBLISHED: 05-31-2013
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Tumour-derived chaperone-rich cell lysate (CRCL) when isolated from tumour tissue or when embedded with peptide antigens is a potent anti-cancer vaccine consisting of numerous chaperone/heat shock proteins, including the highly immunogenic Hsp70, Hsp90, glucose regulated protein 94, and calreticulin. We have previously documented that CRCL provides both a source of tumour antigens and danger signals triggering antigen presenting cell activation. In this report we describe the peptidome of potential antigens extracted from CRCL prepared from a murine tumour. Using mass spectrometry techniques we identify almost 60 different proteins of origin for the CRCL peptides; we determine that the parental proteins come from essentially all parts of the cell, and are involved in a broad range of functions. Further in silico analysis demonstrates that the parental proteins are components of major signalling networks of vital importance for cancer cell survival, proliferation, and migration. In many instances the peptides identified possess amino acid sequences that would allow their putative binding and display by murine major histocompatibility complex class I and II molecules, and there are also predicted binding motifs for Hsp70-type chaperones. By mixing fractionated pools of peptides with antigen-free (normal liver) CRCL, we were able to reconstitute effective anti-tumour activity of the vaccine, showing that the peptides are indeed the major purveyors of CRCL vaccines efficacy.
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Dendritic cell tumor killing activity and its potential applications in cancer immunotherapy.
Crit. Rev. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 03-21-2013
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Universally viewed as the sentinels and messengers of the immune system and traditionally referred to as professional antigen-presenting cells, dendritic cells (DCs) play a fundamental role in antitumor immunity. DCs are uniquely equipped with the ability to acquire, process, and present to T lymphocytes tumor-derived antigens. They can drive the differentiation of naive T cells into activated tumor-specific effector lymphocytes. DCs also dictate the type and regulate the strength and duration of T-cell responses. In addition, they contribute to natural killer and natural killer T-cell antitumoral function and to B-cell-mediated immunity. Besides this cardinal role as orchestrators of innate and adaptive immune responses, many studies have provided evidence that DCs can also function as direct cytotoxic effectors against tumors. This less conventional aspect of DC function has, however, raised controversy as it relates to the origin of these cells and the induction, regulation, and mechanisms underlying their tumoricidal activity. The possible impact of the cytotoxic function of DCs on their capability to present antigens also has been the focus of intensive research. This review examines these questions and discusses the biological significance of this nontraditional property and possible strategies to exploit the killing potential of DCs in cancer immunotherapy.
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Th-1 lymphocytes induce dendritic cell tumor killing activity by an IFN-?-dependent mechanism.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 11-09-2011
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Dendritic cells (DCs) encompass a heterogeneous population of cells capable of orchestrating innate and adaptive immune responses. The ability of DCs to act as professional APCs has been the foundation for the development and use of these cells as vaccines in cancer immunotherapy. DCs are also endowed with the nonconventional property of directly killing tumor cells. The current study investigates the regulation of murine DC cytotoxic function by T lymphocytes. We provide evidence that CD4(+) Th-1, but not Th-2, Th-17 cells, or regulatory T cells, are capable of inducing DC cytotoxic function. IFN-? was identified as the major factor responsible for Th-1-induced DC tumoricidal activity. Tumor cell killing mediated by Th-1-activated killer DCs was dependent on inducible NO synthase expression and NO production. Importantly, Th-1-activated killer DCs were capable of presenting the acquired Ags from the killed tumor cells to T lymphocytes in vitro or in vivo. These observations offer new possibilities for the application of killer DCs in cancer immunotherapy.
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Immunologic effects of rituximab on the human spleen in immune thrombocytopenia.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 08-29-2011
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Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune disease with a complex pathogenesis. As in many B cell-related autoimmune diseases, rituximab (RTX) has been shown to increase platelet counts in some ITP patients. From an immunologic standpoint, the mode of action of RTX and the reasons underlying its limited efficacy have yet to be elucidated. Because splenectomy is a cornerstone treatment of ITP, the immune effect of RTX on this major secondary lymphoid organ was investigated in 18 spleens removed from ITP patients who were treated or not with RTX. Spleens from ITP individuals had follicular hyperplasia consistent with secondary follicles. RTX therapy resulted in complete B-cell depletion in the blood and a significant reduction in splenic B cells, but these patients did not achieve remission. Moreover, whereas the percentage of circulating regulatory T cells (Tregs) was similar to that in controls, splenic Tregs were reduced in ITP patients. Interestingly, the ratio of proinflammatory Th1 cells to suppressive Tregs was increased in the spleens of patients who failed RTX therapy. These results indicate that although B cells are involved in ITP pathogenesis, RTX-induced total B-cell depletion is not correlated with its therapeutic effects, which suggests additional immune-mediated mechanisms of action of this drug.
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Cytotoxic dendritic cells generated from cancer patients.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 07-29-2011
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Known for years as professional APCs, dendritic cells (DCs) are also endowed with tumoricidal activity. This dual role of DC as killers and messengers may have important implications for tumor immunotherapy. However, the tumoricidal activity of DCs has mainly been investigated in animal models. Cancer cells inhibit antitumor immune responses using numerous mechanisms, including the induction of immunosuppressive/ tolerogenic DCs that have lost their ability to present Ags in an immunogenic manner. In this study, we evaluated the possibility of generating tumor killer DCs from patients with advanced-stage cancers. We demonstrate that human monocyte-derived DCs are endowed with significant cytotoxic activity against tumor cells following activation with LPS. The mechanism of DC-mediated tumor cell killing primarily involves peroxynitrites. This observed cytotoxic activity is restricted to immature DCs. Additionally, after killing, these cytotoxic DCs are able to activate tumor Ag-specific T cells. These observations may open important new perspectives for the use of autologous cytotoxic DCs in cancer immunotherapy strategies.
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The dendritic cell-regulatory T lymphocyte crosstalk contributes to tumor-induced tolerance.
Clin. Dev. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 05-12-2011
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Tumor cells commonly escape from elimination by innate and adaptive immune responses using multiple strategies among which is the active suppression of effector immune cells. Regulatory T lymphocytes (Treg) and tolerogenic dendritic cells play essential roles in the establishment and persistence of cancer-induced immunosuppression. Differentiating dendritic cells (DCs) exposed to tumor-derived factors may be arrested at an immature stage becoming inept at initiating immune responses and may induce effector T-cell anergy or deletion. These tolerogenic DCs, which accumulate in patients with different types of cancers, are also involved in the generation of Treg. In turn, Treg that expand during tumor progression contribute to the immune tolerance of cancer by impeding DCs ability to orchestrate immune responses and by directly inhibiting antitumoral T lymphocytes. Herein we review these bidirectional communications between DCs and Treg as they relate to the promotion of cancer-induced tolerance.
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Allogeneic effector/memory Th-1 cells impair FoxP3+ regulatory T lymphocytes and synergize with chaperone-rich cell lysate vaccine to treat leukemia.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 12-01-2010
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Therapeutic strategies combining the induction of effective antitumor immunity with the inhibition of the mechanisms of tumor-induced immunosuppression represent a key objective in cancer immunotherapy. Herein we demonstrate that effector/memory CD4(+) T helper-1 (Th-1) lymphocytes, in addition to polarizing type-1 antitumor immune responses, impair tumor-induced CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T lymphocyte (Treg) immunosuppressive function in vitro and in vivo. Th-1 cells also inhibit the generation of FoxP3(+) Tregs from naive CD4(+)CD25(-)FoxP3(-) T cells by an interferon-?-dependent mechanism. In addition, in an aggressive mouse leukemia model (12B1), Th-1 lymphocytes act synergistically with a chaperone-rich cell lysate (CRCL) vaccine, leading to improved survival and long-lasting protection against leukemia. The combination of CRCL as a source of tumor-specific antigens and Th-1 lymphocytes as an adjuvant has the potential to stimulate efficient specific antitumor immunity while restraining Treg-induced suppression.
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Personalized dendritic cell-based tumor immunotherapy.
Immunotherapy
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2010
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Advances in the understanding of the immunoregulatory functions of dendritic cells (DCs) in animal models and humans have led to their exploitation as anticancer vaccines. Although DC-based immunotherapy has proven clinically safe and efficient to induce tumor-specific immune responses, only a limited number of objective clinical responses have been reported in cancer patients. These relatively disappointing results have prompted the evaluation of multiple approaches to improve the efficacy of DC vaccines. The topic of this review focuses on personalized DC-based anticancer vaccines, which in theory have the potential to present to the host immune system the entire repertoire of antigens harbored by autologous tumor cells. We also discuss the implementation of these vaccines in cancer therapeutic strategies, their limitations and the future challenges for effective immunotherapy against cancer.
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Peroxynitrite-dependent killing of cancer cells and presentation of released tumor antigens by activated dendritic cells.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 01-20-2010
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Dendritic cells (DCs), essential for the initiation and regulation of adaptive immune responses, have been used as anticancer vaccines. DCs may also directly trigger tumor cell death. In the current study, we have investigated the tumoricidal and immunostimulatory activities of mouse bone marrow-derived DCs. Our results indicate that these cells acquire killing capabilities toward tumor cells only when activated with LPS or Pam3Cys-SK4. Using different transgenic mouse models including inducible NO synthase or GP91 knockout mice, we have further established that LPS- or Pam3Cys-SK4-activated DC killing activity involves peroxynitrites. Importantly, after killing of cancer cells, DCs are capable of engulfing dead tumor cell fragments and of presenting tumor Ags to specific T lymphocytes. Thus, upon specific stimulation, mouse bone marrow-derived DCs can directly kill tumor cells through a novel peroxynitrite-dependent mechanism and participate at virtually all levels of antitumor immune responses, which reinforces their interest in immunotherapy.
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Signaling pathways induced by a tumor-derived vaccine in antigen presenting cells.
Immunobiology
PUBLISHED: 07-01-2009
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We have previously reported on the anti-tumoral potential of a chaperone-rich cell lysate (CRCL) vaccine. Immunization with CRCL generated from tumors elicits specific T and NK cell-dependent immune responses leading to protective immunity in numerous mouse tumor models. CRCL provides both a source of tumor antigens and danger signals leading to dendritic cell activation. In humans, tumor-derived CRCL induces dendritic cell activation and CRCL-loaded dendritic cells promote the generation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes in vitro. The current study was designed to identify the signaling events and modifications triggered by CRCL in antigen presenting cells. Our results indicate that tumor-derived CRCL not only promotes the activation of dendritic cells, but also significantly fosters the function of macrophages that thus appear as major targets of this vaccine. Activation of both cell types is associated with the induction of the MAP kinase pathway, the phosphorylation of STAT1, STAT5 and AKT and with transcription factor NF-kappaB activation in vitro and in vivo. These results thus provide important insights into the mechanisms by which CRCL-based vaccines exert their adjuvant effects on antigen presenting cells.
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Killer dendritic cells and their potential for cancer immunotherapy.
Cancer Immunol. Immunother.
PUBLISHED: 06-26-2009
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Known for years as the principal messengers of the immune system, dendritic cells (DC) represent a heterogeneous population of antigen presenting cells critically located at the nexus between innate and adaptive immunity. DC play a central role in the initiation of tumor-specific immune responses as they are endowed with the unique ability to take up, process and present tumor antigens to naïve CD4(+) or CD8(+) effector T lymphocytes. By virtue of the cytokines they produce, DC also regulate the type, strength and duration of T cell immune responses. In addition, they can participate in anti-tumoral NK and NKT cell activation and in the orchestration of humoral immunity. More recent studies have documented that besides their primary role in the induction and regulation of adaptive anti-tumoral immune responses, DC are also endowed with the capacity to directly kill cancer cells. This dual role of DC as killers and messengers may have important implications for tumor immunotherapy. First, the direct killing of malignant cells by DC may foster the release and thereby the immediate availability of specific tumor antigens for presentation to cytotoxic or helper T lymphocytes. Second, DC may participate in the effector phase of the immune response, potentially augmenting the diversity of the killing mechanisms leading to tumor elimination. This review focuses on this non-conventional cytotoxic function of DC as it relates to the promotion of cancer immunity and discusses the potential application of killer DC (KDC) in tumor immunotherapy.
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Myeloid-derived suppressor cells from tumor-bearing mice impair TGF-?-induced differentiation of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Tregs from CD4+CD25-FoxP3- T cells.
J. Leukoc. Biol.
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MDSCs and Tregs play an essential role in the immunosuppressive networks that contribute to tumor-immune evasion. The mechanisms by which tumors promote the expansion and/or function of these suppressive cells and the cross-talk between MDSC and Treg remain incompletely defined. Previous reports have suggested that MDSC may contribute to Treg induction in cancer. Herein, we provide evidence that tumor-induced gr-MDSCs, endowed with the potential of suppressing conventional T Lc, surprisingly impair TGF-?1-mediated generation of CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) iTregs. Furthermore, gr-MDSCs impede the proliferation of nTregs without, however, affecting FoxP3 expression. Suppression of iTreg differentiation from naïve CD4(+) cells by gr-MDSC occurs early in the polarization process, requires inhibition of early T cell activation, and depends on ROS and IDO but does not require arginase 1, iNOS, NO, cystine/cysteine depletion, PD-1 and PD-L1 signaling, or COX-2. These findings thus indicate that gr-MDSCs from TB hosts have the unanticipated ability to restrict immunosuppressive Tregs.
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Cytotoxic and antigen presenting functions of T helper-1-activated dendritic cells.
Oncoimmunology
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Although primarily defined by their cardinal antigen-presenting function, dendritic cells (DCs) are also equipped with cytotoxic properties. We have recently reported that DCs activated by IFN?-secreting Th-1 lymphocytes can kill cancer cells and subsequently present the acquired tumor-derived antigens to T lymphocytes both in vitro and in vivo.
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Late effects in adult survivors of pediatric cancer: a guide for the primary care physician.
Am. J. Med.
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Because of significant medical advances in the past 50 years, the number of adult survivors of childhood/adolescent cancer has increased dramatically. Unfortunately, more than 60% of these survivors will have at least 1 long-term side effect from treatment. This growing population requires dedicated care by their primary physicians because they have specific risk factors depending on their initial cancer diagnosis and the treatment modalities they received. Internists and family physicians play an integral role in providing appropriate screening, treatment, and counseling to prevent morbidity and mortality in these patients.
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Diagnostic and treatment challenges for the pediatric hematologist oncologist in endemic areas for coccidioidomycosis.
J. Pediatr. Hematol. Oncol.
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Coccidioidomycosis is a mycosis endemic to certain areas in the Southwest, mostly Arizona and California, Mexico, and parts of Central and South America. Disseminated coccidioidomycosis is much more common in immunocompromised hosts; therefore, it is frequently encountered by pediatric oncologists in endemic areas. Special attention is needed to diagnose, effectively treat the infection, and appropriately adjust chemotherapy treatment plans to minimize immunosuppression. We describe the presentation and course of 6 patients with coccidioidomycosis who were seen by the pediatric hematology-oncology service at the University of Arizona during the last 3 years. Coccidioidomycosis is a relatively common infection encountered by pediatric oncologists in the southwestern states and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients living or visiting these areas.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.