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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
A novel common variant in DCST2 is associated with length in early life and height in adulthood.
Ralf J P van der Valk, Eskil Kreiner-Møller, Marjolein N Kooijman, Mònica Guxens, Evangelia Stergiakouli, Annika Sääf, Jonathan P Bradfield, Frank Geller, M Geoffrey Hayes, Diana L Cousminer, Antje Körner, Elisabeth Thiering, John A Curtin, Ronny Myhre, Ville Huikari, Raimo Joro, Marjan Kerkhof, Nicole M Warrington, Niina Pitkänen, Ioanna Ntalla, Momoko Horikoshi, Riitta Veijola, Rachel M Freathy, Yik-Ying Teo, Sheila J Barton, David M Evans, John P Kemp, Beate St Pourcain, Susan M Ring, George Davey Smith, Anna Bergström, Inger Kull, Hakon Hakonarson, Frank D Mentch, Hans Bisgaard, Bo Chawes, Jakob Stokholm, Johannes Waage, Patrick Eriksen, Astrid Sevelsted, Mads Melbye, , Cornelia M van Duijn, Carolina Medina-Gomez, Albert Hofman, Johan C de Jongste, H Rob Taal, André G Uitterlinden, Loren L Armstrong, Johan Eriksson, Aarno Palotie, Mariona Bustamante, Xavier Estivill, Juan R Gonzalez, Sabrina Llop, Wieland Kiess, Anubha Mahajan, Claudia Flexeder, Carla M T Tiesler, Clare S Murray, Angela Simpson, Per Magnus, Verena Sengpiel, Anna-Liisa Hartikainen, Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Alexandra Lewin, Alexessander Da Silva Couto Alves, Alexandra I Blakemore, Jessica L Buxton, Marika Kaakinen, Alina Rodriguez, Sylvain Sebert, Marja Vaarasmaki, Timo Lakka, Virpi Lindi, Ulrike Gehring, Dirkje S Postma, Wei Ang, John P Newnham, Leo-Pekka Lyytikäinen, Katja Pahkala, Olli T Raitakari, Kalliope Panoutsopoulou, Eleftheria Zeggini, Dorret I Boomsma, Maria Groen-Blokhuis, Jorma Ilonen, Lude Franke, Joel N Hirschhorn, Tune H Pers, Liming Liang, Jinyan Huang, Berthold Hocher, Mikael Knip, Seang-Mei Saw, John W Holloway, Erik Melén, Struan F A Grant, Bjarke Feenstra, William L Lowe, Elisabeth Widén, Elena Sergeyev, Harald Grallert, Adnan Custovic, Bo Jacobsson, Marjo-Riitta Järvelin, Mustafa Atalay, Gerard H Koppelman, Craig E Pennell, Harri Niinikoski, George V Dedoussis, Mark I McCarthy, Timothy M Frayling, Jordi Sunyer, Nicholas J Timpson, Fernando Rivadeneira, Klaus Bønnelykke, Vincent W V Jaddoe.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 10-03-2014
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Common genetic variants have been identified for adult height, but not much is known about the genetics of skeletal growth in early life. To identify common genetic variants that influence fetal skeletal growth, we meta-analyzed 22 genome-wide association studies (Stage 1; N = 28 459). We identified seven independent top single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (P < 1 × 10(-6)) for birth length, of which three were novel and four were in or near loci known to be associated with adult height (LCORL, PTCH1, GPR126 and HMGA2). The three novel SNPs were followed-up in nine replication studies (Stage 2; N = 11 995), with rs905938 in DC-STAMP domain containing 2 (DCST2) genome-wide significantly associated with birth length in a joint analysis (Stages 1 + 2; ? = 0.046, SE = 0.008, P = 2.46 × 10(-8), explained variance = 0.05%). Rs905938 was also associated with infant length (N = 28 228; P = 5.54 × 10(-4)) and adult height (N = 127 513; P = 1.45 × 10(-5)). DCST2 is a DC-STAMP-like protein family member and DC-STAMP is an osteoclast cell-fusion regulator. Polygenic scores based on 180 SNPs previously associated with human adult stature explained 0.13% of variance in birth length. The same SNPs explained 2.95% of the variance of infant length. Of the 180 known adult height loci, 11 were genome-wide significantly associated with infant length (SF3B4, LCORL, SPAG17, C6orf173, PTCH1, GDF5, ZNFX1, HHIP, ACAN, HLA locus and HMGA2). This study highlights that common variation in DCST2 influences variation in early growth and adult height.
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Risk of childhood asthma is associated with CpG-site polymorphisms, regional DNA methylation and mRNA levels at the GSDMB/ORMDL3 locus.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 09-25-2014
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Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in GSDMB (Gasdermin B) and ORMDL3 (ORMDL sphingolipid biosynthesis regulator 3) are strongly associated with childhood asthma, but the molecular alterations contributing to disease remain unknown. We investigated the effects of asthma-associated SNPs on DNA methylation and mRNA levels of GSDMB and ORMDL3. Genetic association between GSDMB/ORMDL3 and physician-diagnosed childhood asthma was confirmed in the Swedish birth-cohort BAMSE. CpG-site SNPs (rs7216389 and rs4065275) showed differences in DNA methylation depending on carrier status of the risk alleles, and were significantly associated with methylation levels in two CpG sites in the 5' UTR (untranslated region) of ORMDL3. In the Swedish Search study, we found significant differences in DNA methylation between asthmatics and controls in five CpG sites; after adjusting for lymphocyte and neutrophil cell counts, three remained significant: one in IKZF3 [IKAROS family zinc finger 3 (Aiolos); cg16293631] and two in the CpG island (CGI) of ORMDL3 (cg02305874 and cg16638648). Also, cg16293631 and cg02305874 correlated with mRNA levels of ORMDL3. The association between methylation and asthma was independent of the genotype in rs7216389, rs4065275 and rs12603332. Both SNPs and CpG sites showed significant associations with ORMDL3 mRNA levels. SNPs influenced expression independently of methylation, and the residual association between methylation and expression was not mediated by these SNPs. We found a differentially methylated region in the CGI shore of ORMDL3 with six CpG sites less methylated in CD8(+) T-cells. In summary, this study supports that there are differences in DNA methylation at this locus between asthmatics and controls; and both SNPs and CpG sites are independently associated with ORMDL3 expression.
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Reversal of Immunoglobulin A Deficiency in Children.
J. Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 09-04-2014
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Immunoglobulin A deficiency (IgAD) is the most common primary immunodeficiency in the general population. It is defined as a serum IgA level below or equal to 0.07 g/l with normal IgM and IgG levels in children over the age of 4. However, a few cases of reversal of IgAD at later ages have been observed previously, especially in pediatric patients. This study aimed at investigating the frequency of reversal in a large cohort of children and young adults in order to evaluate the present definition of IgAD.
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Pre- and postnatal exposure to parental smoking and allergic disease through adolescence.
Pediatrics
PUBLISHED: 08-20-2014
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To examine the role of prenatal and postnatal second-hand tobacco smoke (SHS) exposure on asthma, rhinitis, and eczema development up to 16 years of age.
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An update on epigenetics and childhood respiratory diseases.
Paediatr Respir Rev
PUBLISHED: 07-31-2014
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Epigenetic mechanisms, defined as changes in phenotype or gene expression caused by mechanisms other than changes in the underlying DNA sequence, have been proposed to constitute a link between genetic and environmental factors that affect complex diseases. Recent studies show that DNA methylation, one of the key epigenetic mechanisms, is altered in children exposed to air pollutants and environmental tobacco smoke early in life. Several candidate gene studies on epigenetics have been published to date, but it is only recently that global methylation analyses have been performed for respiratory disorders such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, large-scale studies with adequate power are yet to be presented in children, and implications for clinical use remain to be evaluated. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in epigenetics and respiratory disorders in children, with a main focus on methodological challenges and analyses related to phenotype and exposure using global methylation approaches.
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Risk factors and markers of asthma control differ between asthma subtypes in children.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol
PUBLISHED: 07-06-2014
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There is limited understanding about risk factors for asthma, and few studies have presented an overall picture of factors associated with asthma subtypes in schoolchildren. The aim of this study was to evaluate risk factors and markers of asthma control associated with asthma subtypes up to preadolescence.
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Genome-wide association analysis identifies six new loci associated with forced vital capacity.
Daan W Loth, María Soler Artigas, Sina A Gharib, Louise V Wain, Nora Franceschini, Beate Koch, Tess D Pottinger, Albert Vernon Smith, Qing Duan, Chris Oldmeadow, Mi Kyeong Lee, David P Strachan, Alan L James, Jennifer E Huffman, Veronique Vitart, Adaikalavan Ramasamy, Nicholas J Wareham, Jaakko Kaprio, Xin-Qun Wang, Holly Trochet, Mika Kähönen, Claudia Flexeder, Eva Albrecht, Lorna M Lopez, Kim de Jong, Bharat Thyagarajan, Alexessander Couto Alves, Stefan Enroth, Ernst Omenaas, Peter K Joshi, Tove Fall, Ana Viñuela, Lenore J Launer, Laura R Loehr, Myriam Fornage, Guo Li, Jemma B Wilk, Wenbo Tang, Ani Manichaikul, Lies Lahousse, Tamara B Harris, Kari E North, Alicja R Rudnicka, Jennie Hui, Xiangjun Gu, Thomas Lumley, Alan F Wright, Nicholas D Hastie, Susan Campbell, Rajesh Kumar, Isabelle Pin, Robert A Scott, Kirsi H Pietiläinen, Ida Surakka, Yongmei Liu, Elizabeth G Holliday, Holger Schulz, Joachim Heinrich, Gail Davies, Judith M Vonk, Mary Wojczynski, Anneli Pouta, Asa Johansson, Sarah H Wild, Erik Ingelsson, Fernando Rivadeneira, Henry Völzke, Pirro G Hysi, Gudny Eiriksdottir, Alanna C Morrison, Jerome I Rotter, Wei Gao, Dirkje S Postma, Wendy B White, Stephen S Rich, Albert Hofman, Thor Aspelund, David Couper, Lewis J Smith, Bruce M Psaty, Kurt Lohman, Esteban G Burchard, André G Uitterlinden, Melissa Garcia, Bonnie R Joubert, Wendy L McArdle, A Bill Musk, Nadia Hansel, Susan R Heckbert, Lina Zgaga, Joyce B J van Meurs, Pau Navarro, Igor Rudan, Yeon-Mok Oh, Susan Redline, Deborah L Jarvis, Jing Hua Zhao, Taina Rantanen, George T O'Connor, Samuli Ripatti, Rodney J Scott, Stefan Karrasch, Harald Grallert, Nathan C Gaddis, John M Starr, Cisca Wijmenga, Ryan L Minster, David J Lederer, Juha Pekkanen, Ulf Gyllensten, Harry Campbell, Andrew P Morris, Sven Gläser, Christopher J Hammond, Kristin M Burkart, John Beilby, Stephen B Kritchevsky, Vilmundur Gudnason, Dana B Hancock, O Dale Williams, Ozren Polašek, Tatijana Zemunik, Ivana Kolčić, Marcy F Petrini, Matthias Wjst, Woo Jin Kim, David J Porteous, Generation Scotland, Blair H Smith, Anne Viljanen, Markku Heliövaara, John R Attia, Ian Sayers, Regina Hampel, Christian Gieger, Ian J Deary, H Marike Boezen, Anne Newman, Marjo-Riitta Järvelin, James F Wilson, Lars Lind, Bruno H Stricker, Alexander Teumer, Timothy D Spector, Erik Melén, Marjolein J Peters, Leslie A Lange, R Graham Barr, Ken R Bracke, Fien M Verhamme, Joohon Sung, Pieter S Hiemstra, Patricia A Cassano, Akshay Sood, Caroline Hayward, Josée Dupuis, Ian P Hall, Guy G Brusselle, Martin D Tobin, Stephanie J London.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 05-22-2014
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Forced vital capacity (FVC), a spirometric measure of pulmonary function, reflects lung volume and is used to diagnose and monitor lung diseases. We performed genome-wide association study meta-analysis of FVC in 52,253 individuals from 26 studies and followed up the top associations in 32,917 additional individuals of European ancestry. We found six new regions associated at genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10(-8)) with FVC in or near EFEMP1, BMP6, MIR129-2-HSD17B12, PRDM11, WWOX and KCNJ2. Two loci previously associated with spirometric measures (GSTCD and PTCH1) were related to FVC. Newly implicated regions were followed up in samples from African-American, Korean, Chinese and Hispanic individuals. We detected transcripts for all six newly implicated genes in human lung tissue. The new loci may inform mechanisms involved in lung development and the pathogenesis of restrictive lung disease.
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IgA measurements in over 12 000 Swedish twins reveal sex differential heritability and regulatory locus near CD30L.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-27-2014
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In a broad attempt to improve the understanding of the genetic regulation of serum IgA levels, the heritability was estimated in over 12 000 Swedish twins, and a genome-wide association study was conducted in a subsample of 9617. Using the classical twin model the heritability was found to be significantly larger among females (61%) compared with males (21%), while contribution from shared environment (20%) was only seen for males. By modeling the genetic relationship matrix with IgA levels, we estimate that a substantial proportion (31%) of variance in IgA levels can ultimately be explained by the investigated SNPs. The genome-wide association study revealed significant association to two loci: (i) rs6928791 located on chromosome 6, 22 kb upstream of the gene SAM and SH3 domain containing 1 (SASH1) and (ii) rs13300483 on chromosome 9, situated 12 kb downstream the CD30 ligand (CD30L) encoding gene. The association to rs13300483 was replicated in two additional independent Swedish materials. The heritability of IgA levels is moderate and can partly be attributable to common variation in the CD30L locus.
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Subnormal levels of vitamin D are associated with acute wheeze in young children.
Acta Paediatr.
PUBLISHED: 03-24-2014
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This study evaluated risk factors for acute wheeze in preschool children and investigated whether subnormal levels of vitamin D were associated with increased risk for acute wheeze, atopy or viral/bacterial respiratory infections.
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Prevalence of severe childhood asthma according to the WHO.
Respir Med
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2014
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The World Health Organization (WHO) recently proposed a new definition of severe asthma to facilitate standardized characterization of patients, and enable more accurate estimations of the prevalence of severe asthma. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of severe asthma according to the WHO definition in children aged 12 years, in Stockholm, Sweden.
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Maternal BMI in early pregnancy and offspring asthma, rhinitis and eczema up to 16 years of age.
Clin. Exp. Allergy
PUBLISHED: 01-17-2014
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Maternal obesity has been linked to offspring asthma, however other allergy-related diseases, as well as the association beyond early school-age are largely unstudied.
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A genome-wide association study of atopic dermatitis identifies loci with overlapping effects on asthma and psoriasis.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-25-2013
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Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common dermatological disease of childhood. Many children with AD have asthma and AD shares regions of genetic linkage with psoriasis, another chronic inflammatory skin disease. We present here a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of childhood-onset AD in 1563 European cases with known asthma status and 4054 European controls. Using Illumina genotyping followed by imputation, we generated 268 034 consensus genotypes and in excess of 2 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for analysis. Association signals were assessed for replication in a second panel of 2286 European cases and 3160 European controls. Four loci achieved genome-wide significance for AD and replicated consistently across all cohorts. These included the epidermal differentiation complex (EDC) on chromosome 1, the genomic region proximal to LRRC32 on chromosome 11, the RAD50/IL13 locus on chromosome 5 and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) on chromosome 6; reflecting action of classical HLA alleles. We observed variation in the contribution towards co-morbid asthma for these regions of association. We further explored the genetic relationship between AD, asthma and psoriasis by examining previously identified susceptibility SNPs for these diseases. We found considerable overlap between AD and psoriasis together with variable coincidence between allergic rhinitis (AR) and asthma. Our results indicate that the pathogenesis of AD incorporates immune and epidermal barrier defects with combinations of specific and overlapping effects at individual loci.
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HTR4 gene structure and altered expression in the developing lung.
Respir. Res.
PUBLISHED: 06-13-2013
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Meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning the 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 4 (5-HT?R) gene (HTR4) associated with lung function. The aims of this study were to i) investigate the expression profile of HTR4 in adult and fetal lung tissue and cultured airway cells, ii) further define HTR4 gene structure and iii) explore the potential functional implications of key SNPs using a bioinformatic approach.
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Exposure to air pollution from traffic and childhood asthma until 12 years of age.
Epidemiology
PUBLISHED: 06-01-2013
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There are limited prospective data on long-term exposure to air pollution and effects on childhood respiratory morbidity. We investigated the development of asthma and related symptoms longitudinally over the first 12 years of life in relation to air pollution from road traffic.
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Fish consumption in infancy and development of allergic disease up to age 12 y.
Am. J. Clin. Nutr.
PUBLISHED: 04-10-2013
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Fish intake in infancy has been associated with reduced risk of allergic disease in early childhood, but it is unknown whether this effect remains as children grow older.
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The chitinase-like protein YKL-40: a possible biomarker of inflammation and airway remodeling in severe pediatric asthma.
J. Allergy Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 03-06-2013
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Problematic severe childhood asthma includes a subgroup of patients who are resistant to therapy. The specific mechanisms involved are unknown, and novel biomarkers are required to facilitate treatment and diagnosis of therapy-resistant asthma. The chitinase-like protein YKL-40 has been related to asthma and airway remodeling.
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Interaction between retinoid acid receptor-related orphan receptor alpha (RORA) and neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1) in asthma.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-21-2013
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Retinoid acid receptor-related Orphan Receptor Alpha (RORA) was recently identified as a susceptibility gene for asthma in a genome-wide association study. To investigate the impact of RORA on asthma susceptibility, we performed a genetic association study between RORA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the vicinity of the asthma-associated SNP (rs11071559) and asthma-related traits. Because the regulatory region of a previously implicated asthma susceptibility gene, Neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1), has predicted elements for RORA binding, we hypothesized that RORA may interact biologically and genetically with NPSR1. 37 RORA SNPs and eight NPSR1 SNPs were genotyped in the Swedish birth cohort BAMSE (2033 children) and the European cross-sectional PARSIFAL study (1120 children). Seven RORA SNPs confined into a 49 kb region were significantly associated with physician-diagnosed childhood asthma. The most significant association with rs7164773 (T/C) was driven by the CC genotype in asthma cases (OR?=?2.0, 95%CI 1.36-2.93, p?=?0.0003 in BAMSE; and 1.61, 1.18-2.19, p?=?0.002 in the combined BAMSE-PARSIFAL datasets, respectively), and strikingly, the risk effect was dependent on the Gln344Arg mutation in NPSR1. In cell models, stimulation of NPSR1 activated a pathway including RORA and other circadian clock genes. Over-expression of RORA decreased NPSR1 promoter activity further suggesting a regulatory loop between these genes. In addition, Rora mRNA expression was lower in the lung tissue of Npsr1 deficient mice compared to wildtype littermates during the early hours of the light period. We conclude that RORA SNPs are associated with childhood asthma and show epistasis with NPSR1, and the interaction between RORA and NPSR1 may be of biological relevance. Combinations of common susceptibility alleles and less common functional polymorphisms may modify the joint risk effects on asthma susceptibility.
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Investigation of novel genes for lung function in children and their interaction with tobacco smoke exposure: a preliminary report.
Acta Paediatr.
PUBLISHED: 02-12-2013
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To replicate newly reported single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations with adult lung function in a cohort of children and to investigate interactions with tobacco smoke exposure on lung function.
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DNA methylation in the Neuropeptide S Receptor 1 (NPSR1) promoter in relation to asthma and environmental factors.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2013
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Asthma and allergy are complex disorders influenced by both inheritance and environment, a relationship that might be further clarified by epigenetics. Neuropeptide S Receptor 1 (NPSR1) has been associated with asthma and allergy and a study suggested modulation of the genetic risk by environmental factors. We aimed to study DNA methylation in the promoter region of NPSR1 in relation to asthma and environmental exposures. Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay (EMSA) was used to investigate potential functional roles of both genotypes and methylation status in the NPSR1 promoter. DNA methylation was analysed using EpiTYPER in blood samples from two well-characterized cohorts; the BIOAIR study of severe asthma in adults and the Swedish birth cohort BAMSE. We observed that DNA methylation and genetic variants in the promoter influenced the binding of nuclear proteins to DNA, suggesting functional relevance. Significant, although small, differences in methylation were related to both adult severe asthma (p?=?0.0001) and childhood allergic asthma (p?=?0.01). Furthermore, DNA methylation was associated with exposures such as current smoking in adults for two CpG sites (p?=?0.005 and 0.04), parental smoking during infancy in the children (p?=?0.02) and in which month the sample was taken (p?=?0.01). In summary, DNA methylation levels in the promoter of NPSR1 showed small but significant associations with asthma, both in adults and in children, and to related traits such as allergy and certain environmental exposures. Both genetic variation and the methylated state of CpG sites seem to have an effect on the binding of nuclear proteins in the regulatory region of NPSR1 suggesting complex regulation of this gene in asthma and allergy.
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Rule-Based Models of the Interplay between Genetic and Environmental Factors in Childhood Allergy.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Both genetic and environmental factors are important for the development of allergic diseases. However, a detailed understanding of how such factors act together is lacking. To elucidate the interplay between genetic and environmental factors in allergic diseases, we used a novel bioinformatics approach that combines feature selection and machine learning. In two materials, PARSIFAL (a European cross-sectional study of 3113 children) and BAMSE (a Swedish birth-cohort including 2033 children), genetic variants as well as environmental and lifestyle factors were evaluated for their contribution to allergic phenotypes. Monte Carlo feature selection and rule based models were used to identify and rank rules describing how combinations of genetic and environmental factors affect the risk of allergic diseases. Novel interactions between genes were suggested and replicated, such as between ORMDL3 and RORA, where certain genotype combinations gave odds ratios for current asthma of 2.1 (95% CI 1.2-3.6) and 3.2 (95% CI 2.0-5.0) in the BAMSE and PARSIFAL children, respectively. Several combinations of environmental factors appeared to be important for the development of allergic disease in children. For example, use of baby formula and antibiotics early in life was associated with an odds ratio of 7.4 (95% CI 4.5-12.0) of developing asthma. Furthermore, genetic variants together with environmental factors seemed to play a role for allergic diseases, such as the use of antibiotics early in life and COL29A1 variants for asthma, and farm living and NPSR1 variants for allergic eczema. Overall, combinations of environmental and life style factors appeared more frequently in the models than combinations solely involving genes. In conclusion, a new bioinformatics approach is described for analyzing complex data, including extensive genetic and environmental information. Interactions identified with this approach could provide useful hints for further in-depth studies of etiological mechanisms and may also strengthen the basis for risk assessment and prevention.
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GSTCD and INTS12 regulation and expression in the human lung.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) meta-analyses have identified a strong association signal for lung function, which maps to a region on 4q24 containing two oppositely transcribed genes: glutathione S-transferase, C-terminal domain containing (GSTCD) and integrator complex subunit 12 (INTS12). Both genes were found to be expressed in a range of human airway cell types. The promoter regions and transcription start sites were determined in mRNA from human lung and a novel splice variant was identified for each gene. We obtained the following evidence for GSTCD and INTS12 co-regulation and expression: (i) correlated mRNA expression was observed both via Q-PCR and in a lung expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) study, (ii) induction of both GSTCD and INTS12 mRNA expression in human airway smooth muscle cells was seen in response to TGF?1, (iii) a lung eQTL study revealed that both GSTCD and INTS12 mRNA levels positively correlate with percent predicted FEV1, and (iv) FEV1 GWAS associated SNPs in 4q24 were found to act as an eQTL for INTS12 in a number of tissues. In fixed sections of human lung tissue, GSTCD protein expression was ubiquitous, whereas INTS12 expression was predominantly in epithelial cells and pneumocytes. During human fetal lung development, GSTCD protein expression was observed to be highest at the earlier pseudoglandular stage (10-12 weeks) compared with the later canalicular stage (17-19 weeks), whereas INTS12 expression levels did not alter throughout these stages. Knowledge of the transcriptional and translational regulation and expression of GSTCD and INTS12 provides important insights into the potential role of these genes in determining lung function. Future work is warranted to fully define the functions of INTS12 and GSTCD.
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Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies three new risk loci for atopic dermatitis.
Lavinia Paternoster, Marie Standl, Chih-Mei Chen, Adaikalavan Ramasamy, Klaus Bønnelykke, Liesbeth Duijts, Manuel A Ferreira, Alexessander Couto Alves, Jacob P Thyssen, Eva Albrecht, Hansjörg Baurecht, Bjarke Feenstra, Patrick M A Sleiman, Pirro Hysi, Nicole M Warrington, Ivan Curjuric, Ronny Myhre, John A Curtin, Maria M Groen-Blokhuis, Marjan Kerkhof, Annika Sääf, Andre Franke, David Ellinghaus, Regina Fölster-Holst, Emmanouil Dermitzakis, Stephen B Montgomery, Holger Prokisch, Katharina Heim, Anna-Liisa Hartikainen, Anneli Pouta, Juha Pekkanen, Alexandra I F Blakemore, Jessica L Buxton, Marika Kaakinen, David L Duffy, Pamela A Madden, Andrew C Heath, Grant W Montgomery, Philip J Thompson, Melanie C Matheson, Peter Le Souef, , Beate St Pourcain, George Davey Smith, John Henderson, John P Kemp, Nicholas J Timpson, Panos Deloukas, Susan M Ring, H-Erich Wichmann, Martina Müller-Nurasyid, Natalija Novak, Norman Klopp, Elke Rodríguez, Wendy McArdle, Allan Linneberg, Torkil Menné, Ellen A Nohr, Albert Hofman, André G Uitterlinden, Cornelia M van Duijn, Fernando Rivadeneira, Johan C de Jongste, Ralf J P van der Valk, Matthias Wjst, Rain Jõgi, Frank Geller, Heather A Boyd, Jeffrey C Murray, Cecilia Kim, Frank Mentch, Michael March, Massimo Mangino, Tim D Spector, Veronique Bataille, Craig E Pennell, Patrick G Holt, Peter Sly, Carla M T Tiesler, Elisabeth Thiering, Thomas Illig, Medea Imboden, Wenche Nystad, Angela Simpson, Jouke-Jan Hottenga, Dirkje Postma, Gerard H Koppelman, Henriëtte A Smit, Cilla Söderhäll, Bo Chawes, Eskil Kreiner-Møller, Hans Bisgaard, Erik Melén, Dorret I Boomsma, Adnan Custovic, Bo Jacobsson, Nicole M Probst-Hensch, Lyle J Palmer, Daniel Glass, Hakon Hakonarson, Mads Melbye, Deborah L Jarvis, Vincent W V Jaddoe, Christian Gieger, David P Strachan, Nicholas G Martin, Marjo-Riitta Järvelin, Joachim Heinrich, David M Evans, Stephan Weidinger.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-08-2011
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Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a commonly occurring chronic skin disease with high heritability. Apart from filaggrin (FLG), the genes influencing atopic dermatitis are largely unknown. We conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 5,606 affected individuals and 20,565 controls from 16 population-based cohorts and then examined the ten most strongly associated new susceptibility loci in an additional 5,419 affected individuals and 19,833 controls from 14 studies. Three SNPs reached genome-wide significance in the discovery and replication cohorts combined, including rs479844 upstream of OVOL1 (odds ratio (OR) = 0.88, P = 1.1 × 10(-13)) and rs2164983 near ACTL9 (OR = 1.16, P = 7.1 × 10(-9)), both of which are near genes that have been implicated in epidermal proliferation and differentiation, as well as rs2897442 in KIF3A within the cytokine cluster at 5q31.1 (OR = 1.11, P = 3.8 × 10(-8)). We also replicated association with the FLG locus and with two recently identified association signals at 11q13.5 (rs7927894; P = 0.008) and 20q13.33 (rs6010620; P = 0.002). Our results underline the importance of both epidermal barrier function and immune dysregulation in atopic dermatitis pathogenesis.
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Traffic-related air pollution and development of allergic sensitization in children during the first 8 years of life.
J. Allergy Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 05-22-2011
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The role of exposure to air pollution in the development of allergic sensitization remains unclear.
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Expression analysis of asthma candidate genes during human and murine lung development.
Respir. Res.
PUBLISHED: 03-15-2011
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Little is known about the role of most asthma susceptibility genes during human lung development. Genetic determinants for normal lung development are not only important early in life, but also for later lung function.
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A comprehensive analysis of the COL29A1 gene does not support a role in eczema.
J. Allergy Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2011
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Based on a recent positional cloning approach, it was claimed that the collagen 29A1 gene (COL29A1), which encodes an epidermal collagen, represents a major risk gene for eczema underlying a previously reported linkage to chromosome 3q21. However, thus far, not a single replication attempt has been published, and no definitive functional data have been provided.
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Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is associated with allergic rhinitis in children with asthma.
Clin Mol Allergy
PUBLISHED: 01-18-2011
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Allergic rhinitis (AR) affects up to 80% of children with asthma and increases asthma severity. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is a key mediator of allergic inflammation. The role of the TSLP gene (TSLP) in the pathogenesis of AR has not been studied.
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Assessment of the neuropeptide S system in anxiety disorders.
Biol. Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 05-25-2010
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The G protein-coupled receptor neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1) and its ligand neuropeptide S (NPS) form a signaling system mainly implicated in susceptibility to asthma and inflammatory disorders in humans and regulation of anxiety and arousal in rodents. We addressed here the role of NPS and NPSR1 as susceptibility genes for human anxiety disorders.
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Analyses of shared genetic factors between asthma and obesity in children.
J. Allergy Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 02-16-2010
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Epidemiologic studies consistently show associations between asthma and obesity. Shared genetics might account for this association.
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Breast-feeding in relation to asthma, lung function, and sensitization in young schoolchildren.
J. Allergy Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 01-05-2010
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The evidence from previous studies on beneficial effects of breast-feeding in relation to development of asthma is conflicting.
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Selective IgA deficiency in early life: association to infections and allergic diseases during childhood.
Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2009
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Selective IgA deficiency in early life is quite common in Caucasian populations, but it is unclear whether it increases the risk of infections and allergic diseases during childhood. Serum IgA levels were measured in 2423 children at 4 years of age in a Swedish population based birth cohort (BAMSE). Parental questionnaires were repeatedly sent out during the childs first 8 years of life, collecting information about infections and allergic diseases. 14 children (1:173) were found to be IgA deficient at 4 years of age. These children had an increased risk of pseudocroup at year 1 (p<0.01) and food hypersensitivity at year 4 (p<0.05) as compared to IgA sufficient children. No increased risk was observed in the partial IgA deficiency group. The findings suggest that selective IgA deficiency may increase the risk of parentally reported pseudocroup and food hypersensitivity during early childhood.
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Transcriptome analysis reveals upregulation of bitter taste receptors in severe asthmatics.
Eur. Respir. J.
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The causes of severe childhood asthma are poorly understood. Our aim was to define global patterns of gene expression in children with severe therapy-resistant and controlled asthma. White blood cells were isolated and the global transcriptome profile was characterised using the Affymetrix Human Gene ST 1.0 chip in children with severe, therapy-resistant asthma (n=17), controlled asthma (n=19) and healthy controls (n=18). Receptor expression was studied in separated leukocyte fractions from asthmatic adults (n=12). Overall, 1378 genes were differentially expressed between children with severe/controlled asthma and controls. Three significantly enriched Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways were represented: natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity (upregulated in controlled asthma); N-glycan biosynthesis (downregulated in severe asthma); and bitter taste transduction receptors (TAS2Rs) (upregulated in severe asthma). Quantitative PCR experiments confirmed upregulation of TAS2Rs in severe asthmatics. TAS2R expression was replicated in leukocytes from adult asthmatics, in which TAS2R agonists also inhibited LPS-induced cytokine release. Significant correlations between expression of TAS2Rs and clinical markers of asthma severity were found in both adults and children. In conclusion, specific gene expression patterns were observed in children with severe, therapy-resistant asthma. The increased expression of bronchodilatory TAS2Rs suggests a new target for the treatment of asthma.
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Traffic-related air pollution and lung function in children at 8 years of age: a birth cohort study.
Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med.
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Long-term exposure to air pollution has been related to lung function decrements in children, but the role of timing of exposure remains unknown. Objectives: To assess the role of long-term exposure to air pollution on lung function in school-age children.
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Air pollution, genetics, and allergy: an update.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol
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Air pollution has been increasingly associated with diverse adverse health outcomes, including airway diseases. Data suggest that gene-environment interactions are important in this context. However, evidence regarding causal effects of exposure and development of allergic conditions specifically remains immature. We review the developments of the past 18 months regarding air pollution, genetics and epigenetics, and allergy.
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Genome-wide association study of the age of onset of childhood asthma.
J. Allergy Clin. Immunol.
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Childhood asthma is a complex disease with known heritability and phenotypic diversity. Although an earlier onset has been associated with more severe disease, there has been no genome-wide association study of the age of onset of asthma in children.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.