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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Characterization of reduced and oxidized dopamine and 3,4-dihydrophenylacetic acid, on brain mitochondrial electron transport chain activities.
Biochim. Biophys. Acta
PUBLISHED: 01-19-2011
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Loss of dopamine (DA) homeostasis may be a contributing factor to cell damage in Parkinsons disease (PD). Past studies showing deleterious effects of DA on mitochondrial function, however, have been inconsistent raising questions about mitochondria as a downstream target for DA. Issues such as the dopamine species i.e., reduced or oxidized, time of exposure and the effect of major metabolites such as 3,4-dihydrophenylacetic acid (DOPAC) may contribute to the disparate findings. The present study used isolated, lysed rat brain mitochondria to characterize the effects of oxidized or reduced DA and DOPAC on complex activities of the electron transport chain (ETC). Time of exposure and quantitation of reduced or oxidized catachols for DA and DOPAC were monitored for all experiments. Reduced DA and DOPAC with or without a 30min preincubation had no affect on NADH oxidase activity which monitors the activities of complexes I, III and IV. Complex II activity was inhibited by reduced DA (?500?M), but not by reduced DOPAC and was significantly attenuated by SOD suggesting reactive oxygen species involvement. In contrast, fully oxidized DA and DOPAC dose dependently inhibited NADH oxidase, complex I and complex III activities with IC(50s) in the 50-200?M range. No preincubation was required for inhibition with the catechols when they were fully oxidized. Oxidized DA inhibited complex I only when exposure occurred during stimulated electron flow, suggesting covalent binding of quinones to proteins within active sites of the complex. In intact, well coupled mitochondria, extramitochondrial DA was shown to access the mitochondrial matrix in a dose, time and energy-dependent fashion. The findings suggest that many of the reported inconsistencies with regards to the effects of DA and DOPAC on ETC function can be attributed to the oxidized state of the catechol at the time of exposure. In addition, the findings provide possible downstream targets for DA that could contribute to the vulnerability of dopaminergic neurons in PD.
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Liposomal-glutathione provides maintenance of intracellular glutathione and neuroprotection in mesencephalic neuronal cells.
Neurochem. Res.
PUBLISHED: 06-03-2010
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A liposomal preparation of glutathione (GSH) was investigated for its ability to replenish intracellular GSH and provide neuroprotection in an in vitro model of Parkinsons disease using paraquat plus maneb (PQMB) in rat mesencephalic cultures. In mixed neuronal/glial cultures depleted of intracellular GSH, repletion to control levels occurred over 4 h with liposomal-GSH or non-liposomal-GSH however, liposomal-GSH was 100-fold more potent; EC(50s) 4.75 ?M and 533 ?M for liposomal and non-liposomal-GSH, respectively. Liposomal-GSH utilization was also observed in neuronal cultures, but with a higher EC(50) (76.5 ?M), suggesting that glia facilitate utilization. Blocking ?-glutamylcysteine synthetase with buthionine sulfoxamine prevented replenishment with liposomal-GSH demonstrating the requirement for catabolism and resynthesis. Repletion was significantly attenuated with endosomal inhibition implicating the endosomal system in utilization. Liposomal-GSH provided dose-dependent protection against PQMB with an EC(50) similar to that found for repletion. PQMB depleted intracellular GSH by 50%. Liposomal-GSH spared endogenous GSH during PQMB exposure, but did not require GSH biosynthesis for protection. No toxicity was observed with the liposomal preparation at 200-fold the EC(50) for repletion. These findings indicate that glutathione supplied in a liposomal formulation holds promise as a potential therapeutic for neuronal maintenance.
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The excitatory peptide kisspeptin restores the luteinizing hormone surge and modulates amino acid neurotransmission in the medial preoptic area of middle-aged rats.
Endocrinology
PUBLISHED: 05-07-2009
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Reproductive success depends on a robust and appropriately timed preovulatory LH surge. The LH surge, in turn, requires ovarian steroid modulation of GnRH neuron activation by the neuropeptide kisspeptin and glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurotransmission in the medial preoptic area (mPOA). Middle-aged females exhibit reduced excitation of GnRH neurons and attenuated LH surges under estrogen-positive feedback conditions, in part, due to increased GABA and decreased glutamate neurotransmission in the mPOA. This study tested the hypothesis that altered kisspeptin regulation by ovarian steroids plays a role in age-related LH surge dysfunction. We demonstrate that middle-aged rats exhibiting delayed and attenuated LH surges have reduced levels of Kiss1 mRNA in the anterior hypothalamus under estrogen-positive feedback conditions. Kisspeptin application directly into the mPOA rescues total LH release and the LH surge amplitude in middle-aged rats and increases glutamate and decreases GABA release to levels seen in the mPOA of young females. Moreover, the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK801 blocks kisspeptin reinstatement of the LH surge. These observations suggest that age-related LH surge dysfunction results, in part, from reduced kisspeptin drive under estrogen-positive feedback conditions and that kisspeptin regulates GnRH/LH release, in part, through modulation of mPOA glutamate and GABA release.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.