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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
BikeSafe: evaluating a bicycle safety program for middle school aged children.
Accid Anal Prev
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2014
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The purpose of this study is to measure the effectiveness of a bicycle safety education curriculum for middle school age children in order to reduce the number of injuries and fatalities of bicyclists hit by cars in Miami-Dade County.
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Factors associated with inpatient mortality in a field hospital following the Haiti earthquake, January-May 2010.
Am J Disaster Med
PUBLISHED: 11-24-2011
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To describe factors associated with inpatient mortality in a field hospital established following the 2010 Haiti earthquake.
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Common data elements for pediatric traumatic brain injury: recommendations from the working group on demographics and clinical assessment.
J. Neurotrauma
PUBLISHED: 11-07-2011
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The Common Data Elements (CDEs) initiative is a National Institutes of Health (NIH) interagency effort to standardize naming, definitions, and data structure for clinical research variables. Comparisons of the results of clinical studies of neurological disorders have been hampered by variability in data coding, definitions, and procedures for sample collection. The CDE project objective is to enable comparison of future clinical trials results in major neurological disorders, including traumatic brain injury (TBI), stroke, multiple sclerosis, and epilepsy. As part of this effort, recommendations for CDEs for research on TBI were developed through a 2009 multi-agency initiative. Following the initial recommendations of the Working Group on Demographics and Clinical Assessment, a separate workgroup developed recommendations on the coding of clinical and demographic variables specific to pediatric TBI studies for subjects younger than 18 years. This article summarizes the selection of measures by the Pediatric TBI Demographics and Clinical Assessment Working Group. The variables are grouped into modules which are grouped into categories. For consistency with other CDE working groups, each variable was classified by priority (core, supplemental, and emerging). Templates were produced to summarize coding formats, guide selection of data points, and provide procedural recommendations. This proposed standardization, together with the products of the other pediatric TBI working groups in imaging, biomarkers, and outcome assessment, will facilitate multi-center studies, comparison of results across studies, and high-quality meta-analyses of individual patient data.
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Event-based prospective memory performance during subacute recovery following moderate to severe traumatic brain injury in children: Effects of monetary incentives.
J Int Neuropsychol Soc
PUBLISHED: 01-29-2010
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There are very few studies investigating remediation of event-based prospective memory (EB-PM) impairments following traumatic brain injury (TBI). To address this, we used 2 levels of motivational enhancement (dollars vs. pennies) to improve EB-PM in children with moderate to severe TBI in the subacute recovery phase. Children with orthopedic injuries (OI; n = 61), moderate (n = 28), or severe (n = 30) TBI were compared. Significant effects included Group x Motivation Condition (F(2, 115) = 3.73, p < .03). The OI (p < .002) and moderate TBI (p < .03) groups performed significantly better under the high- versus low-incentive condition; however, the severe TBI group failed to demonstrate improvement (p = .38). EB-PM performance was better in adolescents compared to younger children (p < .02). These results suggest that EB-PM can be significantly improved in the subacute phase with this level of monetary incentives in children with moderate, but not severe, TBI. Other strategies to improve EB-PM in these children at a similar point in recovery remain to be identified and evaluated.
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Preventing pediatric pedestrian injuries.
J Trauma
PUBLISHED: 05-12-2009
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Pedestrian-related crashes cause an estimated 1.2 million deaths and 50 million injuries worldwide. There were 32,590 nonfatal injuries reported among children 0 to 14 years of age in the United States in 2006. The incidence of pedestrian injuries seems to be decreasing due to improvements in trauma care and a nationwide decline in walking. This article is a special communication and overview of selected literature regarding efforts to decrease the frequency of pediatric pedestrian trauma. WalkSafe an elementary school-based pedestrian injury prevention program will be discussed as an example of a program that has been able to demonstrate a decrease in injuries in children.
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The WalkSafe Program: developing and evaluating the educational component.
J Trauma
PUBLISHED: 03-12-2009
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Miami-Dade County, FL, has one of the highest numbers of pediatric pedestrian injuries in the country. To respond to this problem, WalkSafe an elementary school-based pedestrian injury prevention program was created. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the 3-day WalkSafe educational curriculum in a high-risk district.
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Developing a trauma critical care and rehab hospital in Haiti: a year after the earthquake.
Am J Disaster Med
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Prior to the devastating earthquake in Haiti, January 12, 2010, a group of Haitian physicians, leaders and members of Project Medishare for Haiti, a Non-governmental Organization, had developed plans for a Trauma Critical Care Network for Haiti.
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Psychiatric disorders after pediatric traumatic brain injury: a prospective, longitudinal, controlled study.
J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci
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The objective was to examine the effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI), as compared with orthopedic injury (OI), relative to the risk for psychiatric disorder. There has only been one previous prospective study of this nature. Participants were age 7-17 years at the time of hospitalization for either TBI (complicated mild-to-severe) or OI. The study used a prospective, longitudinal, controlled design, with standardized psychiatric assessments conducted at baseline (reflecting pre-injury functioning) and 3 months post-injury. Assessments of pre-injury psychiatric, adaptive functioning, family adversity, and family psychiatric history status were conducted. Severity of injury was assessed by standard clinical scales. The outcome measure was the presence of a psychiatric disorder not present before the injury ("novel"), during the first 3 months after TBI. Enrolled participants (N=141) included children with TBI (N=75) and with OI (N=66). The analyses focused on 118 children (84%) (TBI: N=65; OI: N=53) who returned for follow-up assessment at 3 months. Novel psychiatric disorder (NPD) occurred significantly more frequently in the TBI (32/65; 49%) than the OI (7/53; 13%) group. This difference was not accounted for by pre-injury lifetime psychiatric status; pre-injury adaptive functioning; pre-injury family adversity, family psychiatric history, socioeconomic status, injury severity, or age at injury. Furthermore, none of these variables significantly discriminated between children with TBI who developed, versus those who did not develop, NPD. These findings suggest that children with complicated mild-to-severe TBI are at significantly higher risk than OI-controls for the development of NPD in the first 3 months after injury.
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Neuroimaging correlates of novel psychiatric disorders after pediatric traumatic brain injury.
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry
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To study magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) correlates of novel (new-onset) psychiatric disorders (NPD) after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and orthopedic injury (OI).
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.