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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Emerging roles of extracellular vesicles in the nervous system.
J. Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 11-14-2014
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Information exchange executed by extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, is a newly described form of intercellular communication important in the development and physiology of neural systems. These vesicles can be released from cells, are packed with information including signaling proteins and both coding and regulatory RNAs, and can be taken up by target cells, thereby facilitating the transfer of multilevel information. Recent studies demonstrate their critical role in physiological processes, including nerve regeneration, synaptic function, and behavior. These vesicles also have a sinister role in the propagation of toxic amyloid proteins in neurodegenerative conditions, including prion diseases and Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, in inducing neuroinflammation by exchange of information between the neurons and glia, as well as in aiding tumor progression in the brain by subversion of normal cells. This article provides a summary of topics covered in a symposium and is not meant to be a comprehensive review of the subject.
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Step by Step Manipulation of the CryoCapsule with HPM High Pressure Freezers.
Methods Cell Biol.
PUBLISHED: 10-08-2014
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The CryoCapsule is a tool dedicated to correlative light to electron microscopy experiments. Focused on simplifying the specimen manipulation throughout the entire workflow from live-cell imaging to freeze substitution following cryofixation by high pressure freezing, we introduce here a step by step procedure to use the CryoCapsule either with the high pressure freezing machines: HPM010 or the HPM100.
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Biogenesis, secretion, and intercellular interactions of exosomes and other extracellular vesicles.
Annu. Rev. Cell Dev. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 08-21-2014
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In the 1980s, exosomes were described as vesicles of endosomal origin secreted from reticulocytes. Interest increased around these extracellular vesicles, as they appeared to participate in several cellular processes. Exosomes bear proteins, lipids, and RNAs, mediating intercellular communication between different cell types in the body, and thus affecting normal and pathological conditions. Only recently, scientists acknowledged the difficulty of separating exosomes from other types of extracellular vesicles, which precludes a clear attribution of a particular function to the different types of secreted vesicles. To shed light into this complex but expanding field of science, this review focuses on the definition of exosomes and other secreted extracellular vesicles. Their biogenesis, their secretion, and their subsequent fate are discussed, as their functions rely on these important processes.
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Membrane trafficking. Nucleoside diphosphate kinases fuel dynamin superfamily proteins with GTP for membrane remodeling.
Science
PUBLISHED: 06-28-2014
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Dynamin superfamily molecular motors use guanosine triphosphate (GTP) as a source of energy for membrane-remodeling events. We found that knockdown of nucleoside diphosphate kinases (NDPKs) NM23-H1/H2, which produce GTP through adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-driven conversion of guanosine diphosphate (GDP), inhibited dynamin-mediated endocytosis. NM23-H1/H2 localized at clathrin-coated pits and interacted with the proline-rich domain of dynamin. In vitro, NM23-H1/H2 were recruited to dynamin-induced tubules, stimulated GTP-loading on dynamin, and triggered fission in the presence of ATP and GDP. NM23-H4, a mitochondria-specific NDPK, colocalized with mitochondrial dynamin-like OPA1 involved in mitochondria inner membrane fusion and increased GTP-loading on OPA1. Like OPA1 loss of function, silencing of NM23-H4 but not NM23-H1/H2 resulted in mitochondrial fragmentation, reflecting fusion defects. Thus, NDPKs interact with and provide GTP to dynamins, allowing these motor proteins to work with high thermodynamic efficiency.
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The Complex Ultrastructure of the Endolysosomal System.
Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol
PUBLISHED: 05-22-2014
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Live-cell imaging reveals the endolysosomal system as a complex and highly dynamic network of interacting compartments. Distinct types of endosomes are discerned by kinetic, molecular, and morphological criteria. Although none of these criteria, or combinations thereof, can capture the full complexity of the endolysosomal system, they are extremely useful for experimental purposes. Some membrane domain specializations and specific morphological characteristics can only be seen by ultrastructural analysis after preparation for electron microscopy (EM). Immuno-EM allows a further discrimination of seemingly identical compartments by their molecular makeup. In this review we provide an overview of the ultrastructural characteristics and membrane organization of endosomal compartments, along with their organizing machineries.
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Prion strains are differentially released through the exosomal pathway.
Cell. Mol. Life Sci.
PUBLISHED: 05-07-2014
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Cell-to-cell transfer of prions is a crucial step in the spreading of prion infection through infected tissue. At the cellular level, several distinct pathways including direct cell-cell contacts and release of various types of infectious extracellular vesicles have been described that may potentially lead to infection of naïve cells. The relative contribution of these pathways and whether they may vary depending on the prion strain and/or on the infected cell type are not yet known. In this study we used a single cell type (RK13) infected with three different prion strains. We showed that in each case, most of the extracellular prions resulted from active cell secretion through the exosomal pathway. Further, quantitative analysis of secreted infectivity indicated that the proportion of prions eventually secreted was dramatically dependent on the prion strain. Our data also highlight that infectious exosomes secreted from cultured cells might represent a biologically pertinent material for spiking experiments. Also discussed is the appealing possibility that abnormal PrP from different prion strains may differentially interact with the cellular machinery to promote secretion.
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Control of MT1-MMP transport by atypical PKC during breast-cancer progression.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 04-21-2014
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Dissemination of carcinoma cells requires the pericellular degradation of the extracellular matrix, which is mediated by membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP). In this article, we report a co-up-regulation and colocalization of MT1-MMP and atypical protein kinase C iota (aPKC?) in hormone receptor-negative breast tumors in association with a higher risk of metastasis. Silencing of aPKC in invasive breast-tumor cell lines impaired the delivery of MT1-MMP from late endocytic storage compartments to the surface and inhibited matrix degradation and invasion. We provide evidence that aPKC?, in association with MT1-MMP-containing endosomes, phosphorylates cortactin, which is present in F-actin-rich puncta on MT1-MMP-positive endosomes and regulates cortactin association with the membrane scission protein dynamin-2. Thus, cell line-based observations and clinical data reveal the concerted activity of aPKC, cortactin, and dynamin-2, which control the trafficking of MT1-MMP from late endosome to the plasma membrane and play an important role in the invasive potential of breast-cancer cells.
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The CryoCapsule: simplifying correlative light to electron microscopy.
Traffic
PUBLISHED: 02-12-2014
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Correlating complementary multiple scale images of the same object is a straightforward means to decipher biological processes. Light microscopy and electron microscopy are the most commonly used imaging techniques, yet despite their complementarity, the experimental procedures available to correlate them are technically complex. We designed and manufactured a new device adapted to many biological specimens, the CryoCapsule, that simplifies the multiple sample preparation steps, which at present separate live cell fluorescence imaging from contextual high-resolution electron microscopy, thus opening new strategies for full correlative light to electron microscopy. We tested the biological application of this highly optimized tool on three different specimens: the in vitro Xenopus laevis mitotic spindle, melanoma cells over-expressing YFP-langerin sequestered in organized membranous subcellular organelles and a pigmented melanocytic cell in which the endosomal system was labeled with internalized fluorescent transferrin.
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Recycling endosome tubule morphogenesis from sorting endosomes requires the kinesin motor KIF13A.
Cell Rep
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2014
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Early endosomes consist of vacuolar sorting and tubular recycling domains that segregate components fated for degradation in lysosomes or reuse by recycling to the plasma membrane or Golgi. The tubular transport intermediates that constitute recycling endosomes function in cell polarity, migration, and cytokinesis. Endosomal tubulation and fission require both actin and intact microtubules, but although factors that stabilize recycling endosomal tubules have been identified, those required for tubule generation from vacuolar sorting endosomes (SEs) remain unknown. We show that the microtubule motor KIF13A associates with recycling endosome tubules and controls their morphogenesis. Interfering with KIF13A function impairs the formation of endosomal tubules from SEs with consequent defects in endosome homeostasis and cargo recycling. Moreover, KIF13A interacts and cooperates with RAB11 to generate endosomal tubules. Our data illustrate how a microtubule motor couples early endosome morphogenesis to its motility and function.
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Mitochondria and melanosomes establish physical contacts modulated by Mfn2 and involved in organelle biogenesis.
Curr. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 01-03-2014
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To efficiently supply ATP to sites of high-energy demand and finely regulate calcium signaling, mitochondria adapt their metabolism, shape, and distribution within the cells, including relative positioning with respect to other organelles. However, physical contacts between mitochondria and the secretory/endocytic pathway have been demonstrated so far only with the ER, through structural and functional interorganellar connections.
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Septin6 and Septin7 GTP Binding Proteins Regulate AP-3- and ESCRT-Dependent Multivesicular Body Biogenesis.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Septins (SEPTs) form a family of GTP-binding proteins implicated in cytoskeleton and membrane organization, cell division and host/pathogen interactions. The precise function of many family members remains elusive. We show that SEPT6 and SEPT7 complexes bound to F-actin regulate protein sorting during multivesicular body (MVB) biogenesis. These complexes bind AP-3, an adapter complex sorting cargos destined to remain in outer membranes of maturing endosomes, modulate AP-3 membrane interactions and the motility of AP-3-positive endosomes. These SEPT-AP interactions also influence the membrane interaction of ESCRT (endosomal-sorting complex required for transport)-I, which selects ubiquitinated cargos for degradation inside MVBs. Whereas our findings demonstrate that SEPT6 and SEPT7 function in the spatial, temporal organization of AP-3- and ESCRT-coated membrane domains, they uncover an unsuspected coordination of these sorting machineries during MVB biogenesis. This requires the E3 ubiquitin ligase LRSAM1, an AP-3 interactor regulating ESCRT-I sorting activity and whose mutations are linked with Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies.
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Analysis of ESCRT functions in exosome biogenesis, composition and secretion highlights the heterogeneity of extracellular vesicles.
J. Cell. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 10-08-2013
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Exosomes are extracellular vesicles (EVs) secreted upon fusion of endosomal multivesicular bodies (MVBs) with the plasma membrane. The mechanisms involved in their biogenesis have not yet been fully identified although they could be used to modulate exosome formation and therefore are a promising tool in understanding exosome functions. We have performed an RNA interference screen targeting 23 components of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery and associated proteins in MHC class II (MHC II)-expressing HeLa-CIITA cells. Silencing of HRS, STAM1 or TSG101 reduced the secretion of EV-associated CD63 and MHC II but each gene altered differently the size and/or protein composition of secreted EVs, as quantified by immuno-electron microscopy. By contrast, depletion of VPS4B augmented this secretion while not altering the features of EVs. For several other ESCRT subunits, it was not possible to draw any conclusions about their involvement in exosome biogenesis from the screen. Interestingly, silencing of ALIX increased MHC II exosomal secretion, as a result of an overall increase in intracellular MHC II protein and mRNA levels. In human dendritic cells (DCs), ALIX depletion also increased MHC II in the cells, but not in the released CD63-positive EVs. Such differences could be attributed to a greater heterogeneity in size, and higher MHC II and lower CD63 levels in vesicles recovered from DCs as compared with HeLa-CIITA. The results reveal a role for selected ESCRT components and accessory proteins in exosome secretion and composition by HeLa-CIITA. They also highlight biogenetic differences in vesicles secreted by a tumour cell line and primary DCs.
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Identification and characterization of multiple novel Rab-myosin Va interactions.
Mol. Biol. Cell
PUBLISHED: 09-04-2013
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Myosin Va is a widely expressed actin-based motor protein that binds members of the Rab GTPase family (3A, 8A, 10, 11A, 27A) and is implicated in many intracellular trafficking processes. To our knowledge, myosin Va has not been tested in a systematic screen for interactions with the entire Rab GTPase family. To that end, we report a yeast two-hybrid screen of all human Rabs for myosin Va-binding ability and reveal 10 novel interactions (3B, 3C, 3D, 6A, 6A, 6B, 11B, 14, 25, 39B), which include interactions with three new Rab subfamilies (Rab6, Rab14, Rab39B). Of interest, myosin Va interacts with only a subset of the Rabs associated with the endocytic recycling and post-Golgi secretory systems. We demonstrate that myosin Va has three distinct Rab-binding domains on disparate regions of the motor (central stalk, an alternatively spliced exon, and the globular tail). Although the total pool of myosin Va is shared by several Rabs, Rab10 and Rab11 appear to be the major determinants of its recruitment to intracellular membranes. We also present evidence that myosin Va is necessary for maintaining a peripheral distribution of Rab11- and Rab14-positive endosomes.
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Metastasis suppressor tetraspanin CD82/KAI1 regulates ubiquitylation of epidermal growth factor receptor.
J. Biol. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 07-29-2013
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Ligand-induced ubiquitylation of EGF receptor (EGFR) is an important regulatory mechanism that controls endocytic trafficking of the receptor and its signaling potential. Here we report that tetraspanin CD82/KAI1 specifically suppresses ubiquitylation of EGFR after stimulation with heparin-binding EGF or amphiregulin and alters the rate of recruitment of the activated receptor to EEA1-positive endosomes. The suppressive effect of CD82 is dependent on the heparin-binding domain of the ligand. Deletion of the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of CD82 (CD82?C mutant) inhibits endocytic trafficking of the tetraspanin and compromises its activity toward heparin-binding EGF-activated EGFR. Reduced ubiquitylation of EGFR is accompanied by PKC-dependent increase in serine phosphorylation of c-Cbl in cells expressing elevated levels of CD82. Furthermore, phosphorylation of threonine 654 (PKC phosphorylation site) in the juxtamembrane domain of the receptor is considerably increased in CD82-expressing cells. These results describe previously unsuspected links between tetraspanin proteins and ubiquitylation of their molecular partners (e.g., EGFR). Our data identify CD82 as a new regulator of c-Cbl, which discriminatively controls the activity of this E3 ubiquitin ligase toward heparin-binding ligand-EGFR pairs. Taken together, these observations provide an important new insight into the modulatory role of CD82 in endocytic trafficking of EGF receptor.
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BACE2 processes PMEL to form the melanosome amyloid matrix in pigment cells.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 06-10-2013
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Amyloids are often associated with pathologic processes such as in Alzheimers disease (AD), but can also underlie physiological processes such as pigmentation. Formation of pathological and functional amyloidogenic substrates can require precursor processing by proteases, as exemplified by the generation of A? peptide from amyloid precursor protein (APP) by beta-site APP cleaving enzyme (BACE)1 and ?-secretase. Proteolytic processing of the pigment cell-specific Melanocyte Protein (PMEL) is also required to form functional amyloid fibrils during melanogenesis, but the enzymes involved are incompletely characterized. Here we show that the BACE1 homologue BACE2 processes PMEL to generate functional amyloids. BACE2 is highly expressed in pigment cells and Bace2(-/-) but not Bace1(-/-) mice display coat color defects, implying a specific role for BACE2 during melanogenesis. By using biochemical and morphological analyses, combined with RNA silencing, pharmacologic inhibition, and BACE2 overexpression in a human melanocytic cell line, we show that BACE2 cleaves the integral membrane form of PMEL within the juxtamembrane domain, releasing the PMEL luminal domain into endosomal precursors for the formation of amyloid fibrils and downstream melanosome morphogenesis. These studies identify an amyloidogenic substrate of BACE2, reveal an important physiological role for BACE2 in pigmentation, and highlight analogies in the generation of PMEL-derived functional amyloids and APP-derived pathological amyloids.
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LDL cholesterol recycles to the plasma membrane via a Rab8a-Myosin5b-actin-dependent membrane transport route.
Dev. Cell
PUBLISHED: 05-29-2013
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Mammalian cells acquire cholesterol, a major membrane constituent, via low-density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake. However, the mechanisms by which LDL cholesterol reaches the plasma membrane (PM) have remained obscure. Here, we applied LDL labeled with BODIPY cholesteryl linoleate to identify this pathway in living cells. The egress of BODIPY cholesterol (BC) from late endosomal (LE) organelles was dependent on acid lipase and Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) protein, as for natural cholesterol. We show that NPC1 was needed to recruit Rab8a to BC-containing LEs, and Rab8a enhanced the motility and segregation of BC- and CD63-positive organelles from lysosomes. The BC carriers docked to the cortical actin by a Rab8a- and Myosin5b (Myo5b)-dependent mechanism, typically in the proximity of focal adhesions (FAs). LDL increased the number and dynamics of FAs and stimulated cell migration in an acid lipase, NPC1, and Rab8a-dependent fashion, providing evidence that this cholesterol delivery route to the PM is important for cell movement.
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First identification of Ewings sarcoma-derived extracellular vesicles and exploration of their biological and potential diagnostic implications.
Biol. Cell
PUBLISHED: 03-19-2013
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Exosomes are small RNA- and protein-containing extracellular vesicles (EVs) that are thought to mediate hetero- and homotypic intercellular communication between normal and malignant cells.Tumour-derived exosomes are believed to promote re-programming of the tumour-associated stroma to favour tumour growth and metastasis. Currently, exosomes have been intensively studied in carcinomas. However, little is known about their existence and possible role in sarcomas.
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Lysosome-related organelles: unusual compartments become mainstream.
Curr. Opin. Cell Biol.
PUBLISHED: 03-12-2013
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Lysosome-related organelles (LROs) comprise a group of cell type-specific subcellular compartments with unique composition, morphology and structure that share some features with endosomes and lysosomes and that function in varied processes such as pigmentation, hemostasis, lung plasticity and immunity. In recent years, studies of genetic diseases in which LRO functions are compromised have provided new insights into the mechanisms of LRO biogenesis and the regulated secretion of LRO contents. These insights have revealed previously unappreciated specialized endosomal sorting processes in all cell types, and are expanding our views of the plasticity of the endosomal and secretory systems in adapting to cell type-specific needs.
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Extracellular vesicles: exosomes, microvesicles, and friends.
J. Cell Biol.
PUBLISHED: 02-20-2013
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Cells release into the extracellular environment diverse types of membrane vesicles of endosomal and plasma membrane origin called exosomes and microvesicles, respectively. These extracellular vesicles (EVs) represent an important mode of intercellular communication by serving as vehicles for transfer between cells of membrane and cytosolic proteins, lipids, and RNA. Deficiencies in our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms for EV formation and lack of methods to interfere with the packaging of cargo or with vesicle release, however, still hamper identification of their physiological relevance in vivo. In this review, we focus on the characterization of EVs and on currently proposed mechanisms for their formation, targeting, and function.
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PMEL: a pigment cell-specific model for functional amyloid formation.
Pigment Cell Melanoma Res
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2013
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PMEL is a pigment cell-specific protein responsible for the formation of fibrillar sheets within the pigment organelle, the melanosome. The fibrillar sheets serve as a template upon which melanins polymerize as they are synthesized. The PMEL fibrils are required for optimal pigment cell function, as animals that either lack PMEL expression or express mutant PMEL variants show varying degrees of hypopigmentation and pigment cell inviability. The PMEL fibrils have biophysical properties of amyloid, a protein fold that is frequently associated with neurodegenerative and other diseases. However, PMEL is one of a growing number of non-pathogenic amyloid proteins that contribute to the function of the cell and/or organism that produces them. Understanding how PMEL generates amyloid in a non-pathogenic manner might provide insights into how to avoid toxicity due to pathological amyloid formation. In this review, we summarize and reconcile data concerning the fate of PMEL from its site of synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum to newly formed melanosomes and the role of distinct PMEL subdomains in trafficking and amyloid fibril formation. We then discuss how its progression through the secretory pathway into the endosomal system might allow for the regulated and non-toxic conversion of PMEL into an ordered amyloid polymer.
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Rab30 is required for the morphological integrity of the Golgi apparatus.
Biol. Cell
PUBLISHED: 07-20-2011
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Rab GTPases are key coordinators of eukaryotic intracellular membrane trafficking. In their active states, Rabs localise to the cytoplasmic face of intracellular compartments where they regulate membrane trafficking processes. Many Rabs have been extensively characterised whereas others, such as Rab30, have to date received relatively little attention.
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The ocular albinism type 1 (OA1) GPCR is ubiquitinated and its traffic requires endosomal sorting complex responsible for transport (ESCRT) function.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 07-05-2011
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The function of signaling receptors is tightly controlled by their intracellular trafficking. One major regulatory mechanism within the endo-lysosomal system required for receptor localization and down-regulation is protein modification by ubiquitination and downstream interactions with the endosomal sorting complex responsible for transport (ESCRT) machinery. Whether and how these mechanisms operate to regulate endosomal sorting of mammalian G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) remains unclear. Here, we explore the involvement of ubiquitin and ESCRTs in the trafficking of OA1, a pigment cell-specific GPCR, target of mutations in Ocular Albinism type 1, which localizes intracellularly to melanosomes to regulate their biogenesis. Using biochemical and morphological methods in combination with overexpression and inactivation approaches we show that OA1 is ubiquitinated and that its intracellular sorting and down-regulation requires functional ESCRT components. Depletion or overexpression of subunits of ESCRT-0, -I, and -III markedly inhibits OA1 degradation with concomitant retention within the modified endosomal system. Our data further show that OA1 ubiquitination is uniquely required for targeting to the intralumenal vesicles of multivesicular endosomes, thereby regulating the balance between down-regulation and delivery to melanosomes. This study highlights the role of ubiquitination and the ESCRT machinery in the intracellular trafficking of mammalian GPCRs and has implications for the physiopathology of ocular albinism type 1.
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Exosome secretion: molecular mechanisms and roles in immune responses.
Traffic
PUBLISHED: 06-30-2011
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Exosomes are small membrane vesicles, secreted by most cell types from multivesicular endosomes, and thought to play important roles in intercellular communications. Initially described in 1983, as specifically secreted by reticulocytes, exosomes became of interest for immunologists in 1996, when they were proposed to play a role in antigen presentation. More recently, the finding that exosomes carry genetic materials, mRNA and miRNA, has been a major breakthrough in the field, unveiling their capacity to vehicle genetic messages. It is now clear that not only immune cells but probably all cell types are able to secrete exosomes: their range of possible functions expands well beyond immunology to neurobiology, stem cell and tumor biology, and their use in clinical applications as biomarkers or as therapeutic tools is an extensive area of research. Despite intensive efforts to understand their functions, two issues remain to be solved in the future: (i) what are the physiological function(s) of exosomes in vivo and (ii) what are the relative contributions of exosomes and of other secreted membrane vesicles in these proposed functions? Here, we will focus on the current ideas on exosomes and immune responses, but also on their mechanisms of secretion and the use of this knowledge to elucidate the latter issue.
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Functional mechanisms of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) associated anti-HIV-1 properties.
Cell. Mol. Life Sci.
PUBLISHED: 06-20-2011
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The cellular prion protein PrP(C)/CD230 is a GPI-anchor protein highly expressed in cells from the nervous and immune systems and well conserved among vertebrates. In the last decade, several studies suggested that PrP(C) displays antiviral properties by restricting the replication of different viruses, and in particular retroviruses such as murine leukemia virus (MuLV) and the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). In this context, we previously showed that PrP(C) displays important similarities with the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein and found that PrP(C) expression in a human cell line strongly reduced HIV-1 expression and virus production. Using different PrP(C) mutants, we report here that the anti-HIV-1 properties are mostly associated with the amino-terminal 24-KRPKP-28 basic domain. In agreement with its reported RNA chaperone activity, we found that PrP(C) binds to the viral genomic RNA of HIV-1 and negatively affects its translation. Using a combination of biochemical and cell imaging strategies, we found that PrP(C) colocalizes with the virus assembly machinery at the plasma membrane and at the virological synapse in infected T cells. Depletion of PrP(C) in infected T cells and microglial cells favors HIV-1 replication, confirming its negative impact on the HIV-1 life cycle.
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The tetraspanin CD63 regulates ESCRT-independent and -dependent endosomal sorting during melanogenesis.
Dev. Cell
PUBLISHED: 06-10-2011
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Cargo sorting to intraluminal vesicles (ILVs) of multivesicular endosomes is required for lysosome-related organelle (LRO) biogenesis. PMEL-a component of melanocyte LROs (melanosomes)-is sorted to ILVs in an ESCRT-independent manner, where it is proteolytically processed and assembled into functional amyloid fibrils during melanosome maturation. Here we show that the tetraspanin CD63 directly participates in ESCRT-independent sorting of the PMEL luminal domain, but not of traditional ESCRT-dependent cargoes, to ILVs. Inactivating CD63 in cell culture or in mice impairs amyloidogenesis and downstream melanosome morphogenesis. Whereas CD63 is required for normal PMEL luminal domain sorting, the disposal of the remaining PMEL transmembrane fragment requires functional ESCRTs but not CD63. In the absence of CD63, the PMEL luminal domain follows this fragment and is targeted for ESCRT-dependent degradation. Our data thus reveal a tight interplay regulated by CD63 between two distinct endosomal ILV sorting processes for a single cargo during LRO biogenesis.
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Mutations in or near the transmembrane domain alter PMEL amyloid formation from functional to pathogenic.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-25-2011
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PMEL is a pigment cell-specific protein that forms physiological amyloid fibrils upon which melanins ultimately deposit in the lumen of the pigment organelle, the melanosome. Whereas hypomorphic PMEL mutations in several species result in a mild pigment dilution that is inherited in a recessive manner, PMEL alleles found in the Dominant white (DW) chicken and Silver horse (HoSi)--which bear mutations that alter the PMEL transmembrane domain (TMD) and that are thus outside the amyloid core--are associated with a striking loss of pigmentation that is inherited in a dominant fashion. Here we show that the DW and HoSi mutations alter PMEL TMD oligomerization and/or association with membranes, with consequent formation of aberrantly packed fibrils. The aberrant fibrils are associated with a loss of pigmentation in cultured melanocytes, suggesting that they inhibit melanin production and/or melanosome integrity. A secondary mutation in the Smoky chicken, which reverts the dominant DW phenotype, prevents the accumulation of PMEL in fibrillogenic compartments and thus averts DW-associated pigment loss; a secondary mutation found in the Dun chicken likely dampens a HoSi-like dominant mutation in a similar manner. We propose that the DW and HoSi mutations alter the normally benign amyloid to a pathogenic form that antagonizes melanosome function, and that the secondary mutations found in the Smoky and Dun chickens revert or dampen pathogenicity by functioning as null alleles, thus preventing the formation of aberrant fibrils. We speculate that PMEL mutations can model the conversion between physiological and pathological amyloid.
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Myosin 1b promotes the formation of post-Golgi carriers by regulating actin assembly and membrane remodelling at the trans-Golgi network.
Nat. Cell Biol.
PUBLISHED: 04-18-2011
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The function of organelles is intimately associated with rapid changes in membrane shape. By exerting force on membranes, the cytoskeleton and its associated motors have an important role in membrane remodelling. Actin and myosin 1 have been implicated in the invagination of the plasma membrane during endocytosis. However, whether myosin 1 and actin contribute to the membrane deformation that gives rise to the formation of post-Golgi carriers is unknown. Here we report that myosin 1b regulates the actin-dependent post-Golgi traffic of cargo, generates force that controls the assembly of F-actin foci and, together with the actin cytoskeleton, promotes the formation of tubules at the TGN. Our results provide evidence that actin and myosin 1 regulate organelle shape and uncover an important function for myosin 1b in the initiation of post-Golgi carrier formation by regulating actin assembly and remodelling TGN membranes.
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[Biogenesis of melanosomes - the chessboard of pigmentation].
Med Sci (Paris)
PUBLISHED: 03-08-2011
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Melanosomes are lysosome-related organelles in retinal pigment epithelial cells and epidermal melanocytes in which melanin pigments are synthesized and stored. Melanosomes are generated by multistep processes in which an immature unpigmented organelle forms and then subsequently matures. Such maturation requires inter-organellar transport of protein cargos required for pigment synthesis but also recruitment of effector proteins necessary for the correct transport of melanosomes to the cell periphery. Several studies have started to unravel the main pathways and mechanisms exploited by melanosomal proteins involved in melanosome structure and melanin synthesis. A major unexpected finding seen early in melanosome biogenesis showed the similarities between the fibrillar sheets of premelanosomes and amyloid fibrils. Late steps of melanosome formation are dependent on pathways regulated by proteins encoded by genes mutated in genetic diseases such as the Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrom (HPS) and different types of albinism. Altogether the findings from the past recent years have started to unravel how specialized cells integrate unique and ubiquitous molecular mechanisms in subverting the endosomal system to generate cell-type specific structures and their associated functions. Further dissection of the melanosomal system will likely shed light not only on the biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles but also on general aspects of vesicular transport in the endosomal system.
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Inactivation of Pmel alters melanosome shape but has only a subtle effect on visible pigmentation.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-08-2011
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PMEL is an amyloidogenic protein that appears to be exclusively expressed in pigment cells and forms intralumenal fibrils within early stage melanosomes upon which eumelanins deposit in later stages. PMEL is well conserved among vertebrates, and allelic variants in several species are associated with reduced levels of eumelanin in epidermal tissues. However, in most of these cases it is not clear whether the allelic variants reflect gain-of-function or loss-of-function, and no complete PMEL loss-of-function has been reported in a mammal. Here, we have created a mouse line in which the Pmel gene has been inactivated (Pmel?/?). These mice are fully viable, fertile, and display no obvious developmental defects. Melanosomes within Pmel?/? melanocytes are spherical in contrast to the oblong shape present in wild-type animals. This feature was documented in primary cultures of skin-derived melanocytes as well as in retinal pigment epithelium cells and in uveal melanocytes. Inactivation of Pmel has only a mild effect on the coat color phenotype in four different genetic backgrounds, with the clearest effect in mice also carrying the brown/Tyrp1 mutation. This phenotype, which is similar to that observed with the spontaneous silver mutation in mice, strongly suggests that other previously described alleles in vertebrates with more striking effects on pigmentation are dominant-negative mutations. Despite a mild effect on visible pigmentation, inactivation of Pmel led to a substantial reduction in eumelanin content in hair, which demonstrates that PMEL has a critical role for maintaining efficient epidermal pigmentation.
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Cells respond to mechanical stress by rapid disassembly of caveolae.
Cell
PUBLISHED: 02-08-2011
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The functions of caveolae, the characteristic plasma membrane invaginations, remain debated. Their abundance in cells experiencing mechanical stress led us to investigate their role in membrane-mediated mechanical response. Acute mechanical stress induced by osmotic swelling or by uniaxial stretching results in a rapid disappearance of caveolae, in a reduced caveolin/Cavin1 interaction, and in an increase of free caveolins at the plasma membrane. Tether-pulling force measurements in cells and in plasma membrane spheres demonstrate that caveola flattening and disassembly is the primary actin- and ATP-independent cell response that buffers membrane tension surges during mechanical stress. Conversely, stress release leads to complete caveola reassembly in an actin- and ATP-dependent process. The absence of a functional caveola reservoir in myotubes from muscular dystrophic patients enhanced membrane fragility under mechanical stress. Our findings support a new role for caveolae as a physiological membrane reservoir that quickly accommodates sudden and acute mechanical stresses.
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Sas-4 proteins are required during basal body duplication in Paramecium.
Mol. Biol. Cell
PUBLISHED: 02-02-2011
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Centrioles and basal bodies are structurally related organelles composed of nine microtubule (MT) triplets. Studies performed in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos have shown that centriole duplication takes place in sequential way, in which different proteins are recruited in a specific order to assemble a procentriole. ZYG-1 initiates centriole duplication by triggering the recruitment of a complex of SAS-5 and SAS-6, which then recruits the final player, SAS-4, to allow the incorporation of MT singlets. It is thought that a similar mechanism (that also involves additional proteins) is present in other animal cells, but it remains to be investigated whether the same players and their ascribed functions are conserved during basal body duplication in cells that exclusively contain basal bodies. To investigate this question, we have used the multiciliated protist Paramecium tetraurelia. Here we show that in the absence of PtSas4, two types of defects in basal body duplication can be identified. In the majority of cases, the germinative disk and cartwheel, the first structures assembled during duplication, are not detected. In addition, if daughter basal bodies were formed, they invariably had defects in MT recruitment. Our results suggest that PtSas4 has a broader function than its animal orthologues.
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The ERM proteins interact with the HOPS complex to regulate the maturation of endosomes.
Mol. Biol. Cell
PUBLISHED: 12-09-2010
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In the degradative pathway, the progression of cargos through endosomal compartments involves a series of fusion and maturation events. The HOPS (homotypic fusion and protein sorting) complex is part of the machinery that promotes the progression from early to late endosomes and lysosomes by regulating the exchange of small GTPases. We report that an interaction between subunits of the HOPS complex and the ERM (ezrin, radixin, moesin) proteins is required for the delivery of EGF receptor (EGFR) to lysosomes. Inhibiting either ERM proteins or the HOPS complex leads to the accumulation of the EGFR into early endosomes, delaying its degradation. This impairment in EGFR trafficking observed in cells depleted of ERM proteins is due to a delay in the recruitment of Rab7 on endosomes. As a consequence, the maturation of endosomes is perturbed as reflected by an accumulation of hybrid compartments positive for both early and late endosomal markers. Thus, ERM proteins represent novel regulators of the HOPS complex in the early to late endosomal maturation.
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In vitro differentiation of retinal pigment epithelium from adult retinal stem cells.
Pigment Cell Melanoma Res
PUBLISHED: 11-10-2010
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One of the limitations in molecular and functional studies of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) has been the lack of an in vitro system retaining all the features of in vivo RPE cells. Retinal pigment epithelium cell lines do not show characteristics typical of a functional RPE, such as pigmentation and expression of specific markers. The present study was aimed at the development of culture conditions to differentiate, in vitro, retinal stem cells (RSC), derived from the adult ciliary body, into a functional RPE. Retinal stem cells were purified from murine eyes, grown as pigmented neurospheres and induced to differentiate into RPE on an extracellular matrix substrate using specific culture conditions. After 7-15 days of culture, pigmented cells with an epithelial morphology showed a polarized organization and a capacity for phagocytosis. We detected different stages of melanogenesis in cells at 7 days of differentiation, whereas RPE at 15 days contained only mature melanosomes. These data suggest that our protocol to differentiate RPE in vitro can provide a useful model for molecular and functional studies.
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Ang2/fat-free is a conserved subunit of the Golgi-associated retrograde protein complex.
Mol. Biol. Cell
PUBLISHED: 08-04-2010
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The Golgi-associated retrograde protein (GARP) complex mediates tethering and fusion of endosome-derived transport carriers to the trans-Golgi network (TGN). In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, GARP comprises four subunits named Vps51p, Vps52p, Vps53p, and Vps54p. Orthologues of the GARP subunits, except for Vps51p, have been identified in all other eukaryotes. A yeast two-hybrid screen of a human cDNA library yielded a phylogenetically conserved protein, Ang2/Fat-free, which interacts with human Vps52, Vps53 and Vps54. Human Ang2 is larger than yeast Vps51p, but exhibits significant homology in an N-terminal coiled-coil region that mediates assembly with other GARP subunits. Biochemical analyses show that human Ang2, Vps52, Vps53 and Vps54 form an obligatory 1:1:1:1 complex that strongly interacts with the regulatory Habc domain of the TGN SNARE, Syntaxin 6. Depletion of Ang2 or the GARP subunits similarly impairs protein retrieval to the TGN, lysosomal enzyme sorting, endosomal cholesterol traffic¤ and autophagy. These findings indicate that Ang2 is the missing component of the GARP complex in most eukaryotes.
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Protein complexes containing CYFIP/Sra/PIR121 coordinate Arf1 and Rac1 signalling during clathrin-AP-1-coated carrier biogenesis at the TGN.
Nat. Cell Biol.
PUBLISHED: 02-19-2010
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Actin dynamics is a tightly regulated process involved in various cellular events including biogenesis of clathrin-coated, AP-1 (adaptor protein 1)-coated transport carriers connecting the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and the endocytic pathway. However, the mechanisms coordinating coat assembly, membrane and actin remodelling during post-TGN transport remain poorly understood. Here we show that the Arf1 (ADP-ribosylation factor 1) GTPase synchronizes the TGN association of clathrin-AP-1 coats and protein complexes comprising CYFIP (cytoplasmic fragile-X mental retardation interacting protein; Sra, PIR121), a clathrin heavy chain binding protein associated with mental retardation. The Rac1 GTPase and its exchange factor beta-PIX (PAK-interacting exchange factor) activate these complexes, allowing N-WASP-dependent and Arp2/3-dependent actin polymerization towards membranes, thus promoting tubule formation. These phenomena can be recapitulated with synthetic membranes. This protein-network-based mechanism facilitates the sequential coordination of Arf1-dependent membrane priming, through the recruitment of coats and CYFIP-containing complexes, and of Rac1-dependent actin polymerization, and provides complementary but independent levels of regulation during early stages of clathrin-AP1-coated carrier biogenesis.
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Inhibition of retrograde transport protects mice from lethal ricin challenge.
Cell
PUBLISHED: 01-25-2010
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Bacterial Shiga-like toxins are virulence factors that constitute a significant public health threat worldwide, and the plant toxin ricin is a potential bioterror weapon. To gain access to their cytosolic target, ribosomal RNA, these toxins follow the retrograde transport route from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum, via endosomes and the Golgi apparatus. Here, we used high-throughput screening to identify small molecule inhibitors that protect cells from ricin and Shiga-like toxins. We identified two compounds that selectively block retrograde toxin trafficking at the early endosome-TGN interface, without affecting compartment morphology, endogenous retrograde cargos, or other trafficking steps, demonstrating an unexpected degree of selectivity and lack of toxicity. In mice, one compound clearly protects from lethal nasal exposure to ricin. Our work discovers the first small molecule that shows efficacy against ricin in animal experiments and identifies the retrograde route as a potential therapeutic target.
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AP-1 and KIF13A coordinate endosomal sorting and positioning during melanosome biogenesis.
J. Cell Biol.
PUBLISHED: 10-21-2009
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Specialized cell types exploit endosomal trafficking to deliver protein cargoes to cell type-specific lysosome-related organelles (LROs), but how endosomes are specified for this function is not known. In this study, we show that the clathrin adaptor AP-1 and the kinesin motor KIF13A together create peripheral recycling endosomal subdomains in melanocytes required for cargo delivery to maturing melanosomes. In cells depleted of AP-1 or KIF13A, a subpopulation of recycling endosomes redistributes to pericentriolar clusters, resulting in sequestration of melanosomal enzymes like Tyrp1 in vacuolar endosomes and consequent inhibition of melanin synthesis and melanosome maturation. Immunocytochemistry, live cell imaging, and electron tomography reveal AP-1- and KIF13A-dependent dynamic close appositions and continuities between peripheral endosomal tubules and melanosomes. Our results reveal that LRO protein sorting is coupled to cell type-specific positioning of endosomes that facilitate endosome-LRO contacts and are required for organelle maturation.
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N-terminal domains elicit formation of functional Pmel17 amyloid fibrils.
J. Biol. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 10-19-2009
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Pmel17 is a transmembrane protein that mediates the early steps in the formation of melanosomes, the subcellular organelles of melanocytes in which melanin pigments are synthesized and stored. In melanosome precursor organelles, proteolytic fragments of Pmel17 form insoluble, amyloid-like fibrils upon which melanins are deposited during melanosome maturation. The mechanism(s) by which Pmel17 becomes competent to form amyloid are not fully understood. To better understand how amyloid formation is regulated, we have defined the domains within Pmel17 that promote fibril formation in vitro. Using purified recombinant fragments of Pmel17, we show that two regions, an N-terminal domain of unknown structure and a downstream domain with homology to a polycystic kidney disease-1 repeat, efficiently form amyloid in vitro. Analyses of fibrils formed in melanocytes confirm that the polycystic kidney disease-1 domain forms at least part of the physiological amyloid core. Interestingly, this same domain is also required for the intracellular trafficking of Pmel17 to multivesicular compartments within which fibrils begin to form. Although a domain of imperfect repeats (RPT) is required for fibril formation in vivo and is a component of fibrils in melanosomes, RPT is not necessary for fibril formation in vitro and in isolation is unable to adopt an amyloid fold in a physiologically relevant time frame. These data define the structural core of Pmel17 amyloid, imply that the RPT domain plays a regulatory role in timing amyloid conversion, and suggest that fibril formation might be physically linked with multivesicular body sorting.
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Analysis of articulation between clathrin and retromer in retrograde sorting on early endosomes.
Traffic
PUBLISHED: 10-05-2009
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Clathrin and retromer have key functions for retrograde trafficking between early endosomes and the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Previous studies on Shiga toxin suggested that these two coat complexes operate in a sequential manner. Here, we show that the curvature recognition subunit component sorting nexin 1 (SNX1) of retromer interacts with receptor-mediated endocytosis-8 (RME-8) protein, and that RME-8 and SNX1 colocalize on early endosomes together with a model cargo of the retrograde route, the receptor-binding B-subunit of Shiga toxin (STxB). RME-8 has previously been found to bind to the clathrin uncoating adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) Hsc70, and we now report that depletion of RME-8 or Hsc70 affects retrograde trafficking at the early endosomes-TGN interface of STxB and the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor, an endogenous retrograde cargo protein. We also provide evidence that retromer interacts with the clathrin-binding protein hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (Hrs) not only via SNX1, as previously published (Chin Raynor MC, Wei X, Chen HQ, Li L. Hrs interacts with sorting nexin 1 and regulates degradation of epidermal growth factor receptor. J Biol Chem 2001;276:7069-7078), but also via the core complex component Vps35. Hrs codistributes at the ultrastructural level with STxB on early endosomes, and interfering with Hrs function using antibodies or mild overexpression inhibits retrograde transport. Our combined data suggest a model according to which the functions in retrograde sorting on early endosomes of SNX1/retromer and clathrin are articulated by RME-8, and possibly also by Hrs.
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The ocular albinism type 1 (OA1) G-protein-coupled receptor functions with MART-1 at early stages of melanogenesis to control melanosome identity and composition.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 08-28-2009
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OA1 (GPR143; GPCR, G-protein-coupled receptor), the protein product of the ocular albinism type 1 gene, encodes a pigment-cell-specific GPCR that localizes intracellularly to melanosomes. OA1 mutations result in ocular albinism due to alterations in melanosome formation, suggesting that OA1 is a key player in the biogenesis of melanosomes. To address the function of OA1 in melanosome biogenesis, we have used siRNA inactivation and combined morphological and biochemical methods to investigate melanosome ultrastructure, melanosomal protein localization and expression in human pigmented melanocytic cells. OA1 loss of function leads to decreased pigmentation and causes formation of enlarged aberrant premelanosomes harboring disorganized fibrillar structures and displaying proteins of mature melanosomes and lysosomes at their membrane. Moreover, we show that OA1 interacts biochemically with the premelanosomal protein MART-1. Inactivation of MART-1 by siRNA leads to a decreased stability of OA1 and is accompanied by similar defects in premelanosome biogenesis and composition. These data show for the first time that melanosome composition and identity are regulated at early stages by OA1 and that MART-1 likely acts as an escort protein for this GPCR.
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Rab27a and Rab27b control different steps of the exosome secretion pathway.
Nat. Cell Biol.
PUBLISHED: 08-14-2009
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Exosomes are secreted membrane vesicles that share structural and biochemical characteristics with intraluminal vesicles of multivesicular endosomes (MVEs). Exosomes could be involved in intercellular communication and in the pathogenesis of infectious and degenerative diseases. The molecular mechanisms of exosome biogenesis and secretion are, however, poorly understood. Using an RNA interference (RNAi) screen, we identified five Rab GTPases that promote exosome secretion in HeLa cells. Among these, Rab27a and Rab27b were found to function in MVE docking at the plasma membrane. The size of MVEs was strongly increased by Rab27a silencing, whereas MVEs were redistributed towards the perinuclear region upon Rab27b silencing. Thus, the two Rab27 isoforms have different roles in the exosomal pathway. In addition, silencing two known Rab27 effectors, Slp4 (also known as SYTL4, synaptotagmin-like 4) and Slac2b (also known as EXPH5, exophilin 5), inhibited exosome secretion and phenocopied silencing of Rab27a and Rab27b, respectively. Our results therefore strengthen the link between MVEs and exosomes, and introduce ways of manipulating exosome secretion in vivo.
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MHC II in dendritic cells is targeted to lysosomes or T cell-induced exosomes via distinct multivesicular body pathways.
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PUBLISHED: 07-14-2009
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Dendritic cells (DCs) express major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) to present peptide antigens to T cells. In immature DCs, which bear low cell surface levels of MHC II, peptide-loaded MHC II is ubiquitinated. Ubiquitination drives the endocytosis and sorting of MHC II to the luminal vesicles of multivesicular bodies (MVBs) for lysosomal degradation. Ubiquitination of MHC II is abrogated in activated DCs, resulting in an increased cell surface expression. We here provide evidence for an alternative MVB sorting mechanism for MHC II in antigen-loaded DCs, which is triggered by cognately interacting antigen-specific CD4+ T cells. At these conditions, DCs generate MVBs with MHC II and CD9 carrying luminal vesicles that are secreted as exosomes and transferred to the interacting T cells. Sorting of MHC II into exosomes was, in contrast to lysosomal targeting, independent of MHC II ubiquitination but rather correlated with its incorporation into CD9 containing detergent-resistant membranes. Together, these data indicate two distinct MVB pathways: one for lysosomal targeting and the other for exosome secretion.
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ARF6-regulated shedding of tumor cell-derived plasma membrane microvesicles.
Curr. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 07-01-2009
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Increased mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, small GTPase activation, cytoskeletal rearrangements, and the directed targeting of proteases to sites of extracellular matrix degradation all accompany the process of tumor cell invasion. Several studies have implicated the small GTP-binding protein ARF6 in tumor cell invasion, although the molecular basis by which ARF6 facilitates this process is unclear.
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ESCRT-I function is required for Tyrp1 transport from early endosomes to the melanosome limiting membrane.
Traffic
PUBLISHED: 06-09-2009
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Melanosomes are lysosome-related organelles that coexist with lysosomes within melanocytes. The pathways by which melanosomal proteins are diverted from endocytic organelles toward melanosomes are incompletely defined. In melanocytes from mouse models of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome that lack BLOC-1, melanosomal proteins such as tyrosinase-related protein 1 (Tyrp1) accumulate in early endosomes. Whether this accumulation represents an anomalous pathway or an arrested normal intermediate in melanosome protein trafficking is not clear. Here, we show that early endosomes are requisite intermediates in the trafficking of Tyrp1 from the Golgi to late stage melanosomes in normal melanocytic cells. Kinetic analyses show that very little newly synthesized Tyrp1 traverses the cell surface and that internalized Tyrp1 is inefficiently sorted to melanosomes. Nevertheless, nearly all Tyrp1 traverse early endosomes since it becomes trapped within enlarged, modified endosomes upon overexpression of Hrs. Although Tyrp1 localization is not affected by Hrs depletion, depletion of the ESCRT-I component, Tsg101, or inhibition of ESCRT function by dominant-negative approaches results in a dramatic redistribution of Tyrp1 to aberrant endosomal membranes that are largely distinct from those harboring traditional ESCRT-dependent, ubiquitylated cargoes such as MART-1. The lysosomal protein content of some of these membranes and the lack of Tyrp1 recycling to the plasma membrane in Tsg101-depleted cells suggests that ESCRT-I functions downstream of BLOC-1. Our data delineate a novel pathway for Tyrp1 trafficking and illustrate a requirement for ESCRT-I function in controlling protein sorting from vacuolar endosomes to the limiting membrane of a lysosome-related organelle.
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Exosomes--vesicular carriers for intercellular communication.
Curr. Opin. Cell Biol.
PUBLISHED: 03-18-2009
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Cells release different types of vesicular carriers of membrane and cytosolic components into the extracellular space. These vesicles are generated within the endosomal system or at the plasma membrane. Among the various kinds of secreted membrane vesicles, exosomes are vesicles with a diameter of 40-100 nm that are secreted upon fusion of multivesicular endosomes with the cell surface. Exosomes transfer not only membrane components but also nucleic acid between different cells, emphasizing their role in intercellular communication. This ability is likely to underlie the different physiological and pathological events, in which exosomes from different cell origins have been implicated. Only recently light have been shed on the subcellular compartments and mechanisms involved in their biogenesis and secretion opening new avenues to understand their functions.
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Diaphanous-related formins are required for invadopodia formation and invasion of breast tumor cells.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 03-10-2009
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Proteolytic degradation of the extracellular matrix by metastatic tumor cells is initiated by the formation of invadopodia, i.e., actin-driven filopodia-like membrane protrusions endowed with matrix-degradative activity. A signaling cascade involving neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein and the Arp2/3 actin nucleating complex is involved in actin assembly at invadopodia. Yet, the mechanism of invadopodia formation is poorly understood. Based on their role as actin nucleators in cytoskeletal rearrangements, including filopodia formation, we examined the function of Diaphanous-related formins (DRF) in invadopodia formation and invasion by breast tumor cells. Using small interfering RNA silencing of protein expression in highly invasive MDA-MB-231 breast adenocarcinoma cells, we show that three members of the DRF family (DRF1-DRF3) are required for invadopodia formation and two-dimensional matrix proteolysis. We also report that invasion of a three-dimensional Matrigel matrix involves filopodia-like protrusions enriched for invadopodial proteins, including membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase, which depend on DRFs for their formation. These data identify DRFs as critical components of the invasive apparatus of tumor cells in two-dimensional and three-dimensional matrices and suggest that different types of actin nucleators cooperate during the formation of invadopodia.
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The gene responsible for Dyggve-Melchior-Clausen syndrome encodes a novel peripheral membrane protein dynamically associated with the Golgi apparatus.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-28-2009
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Dyggve-Melchior-Clausen dysplasia (DMC) is a rare inherited dwarfism with severe mental retardation due to mutations in the DYM gene which encodes Dymeclin, a 669-amino acid protein of yet unknown function. Despite a high conservation across species and several predicted transmembrane domains, Dymeclin could not be ascribed to any family of proteins. Here we show, using in situ hybridization, that DYM is widely expressed in human embryos, especially in the cortex, the hippocampus and the cerebellum. Both the endogenous and the recombinant protein fused to green fluorescent protein co-localized with Golgi apparatus markers. Electron microscopy revealed that Dymeclin associates with the Golgi apparatus and with transitional vesicles of the reticulum-Golgi interface. Moreover, permeabilization assays revealed that Dymeclin is not a transmembrane but a peripheral protein of the Golgi apparatus as it can be completely released from the Golgi after permeabilization of the plasma membrane. Time lapse confocal microscopy experiments on living cells further showed that the protein shuttles between the cytosol and the Golgi apparatus in a highly dynamic manner and recognizes specifically a subset of mature Golgi membranes. Finally, we found that DYM mutations associated with DMC result in mis-localization and subsequent degradation of Dymeclin. These data indicate that DMC results from a loss-of-function of Dymeclin, a novel peripheral membrane protein which shuttles rapidly between the cytosol and mature Golgi membranes and point out a role of Dymeclin in cellular trafficking.
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ARF6 Interacts with JIP4 to control a motor switch mechanism regulating endosome traffic in cytokinesis.
Curr. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 02-13-2009
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Recent work has highlighted the importance of the recycling of endocytic membranes to the intercellular bridge for completion of cytokinesis in animal cells. ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6), which localizes to the plasma membrane and endosomal compartments, regulates endocytic recycling to the bridge during cytokinesis and is required for abscission.
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Vesiclepedia: a compendium for extracellular vesicles with continuous community annotation.
PLoS Biol.
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Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are membraneous vesicles released by a variety of cells into their microenvironment. Recent studies have elucidated the role of EVs in intercellular communication, pathogenesis, drug, vaccine and gene-vector delivery, and as possible reservoirs of biomarkers. These findings have generated immense interest, along with an exponential increase in molecular data pertaining to EVs. Here, we describe Vesiclepedia, a manually curated compendium of molecular data (lipid, RNA, and protein) identified in different classes of EVs from more than 300 independent studies published over the past several years. Even though databases are indispensable resources for the scientific community, recent studies have shown that more than 50% of the databases are not regularly updated. In addition, more than 20% of the database links are inactive. To prevent such database and link decay, we have initiated a continuous community annotation project with the active involvement of EV researchers. The EV research community can set a gold standard in data sharing with Vesiclepedia, which could evolve as a primary resource for the field.
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Drosophila S2 cells secrete wingless on exosome-like vesicles but the wingless gradient forms independently of exosomes.
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Wingless acts as a morphogen in Drosophila wing discs, where it specifies cell fates and controls growth several cell diameters away from its site of expression. Thus, despite being acylated and membrane associated, Wingless spreads in the extracellular space. Recent studies have focussed on identifying the route that Wingless follows in the secretory pathway and determining how it is packaged for release. We have found that, in medium conditioned by Wingless-expressing Drosophila S2 cells, Wingless is present on exosome-like vesicles and that this fraction activates signal transduction. Proteomic analysis shows that Wingless-containing exosome-like structures contain many Drosophila proteins that are homologous to mammalian exosome proteins. In addition, Evi, a multipass transmembrane protein, is also present on exosome-like vesicles. Using these exosome markers and a cell-based RNAi assay, we found that the small GTPase Rab11 contributes significantly to exosome production. This finding allows us to conclude from in vivo Rab11 knockdown experiments, that exosomes are unlikely to contribute to Wingless secretion and gradient formation in wing discs. Consistent with this conclusion, extracellularly tagged Evi expressed from a Bacterial Artificial Chromosome is not released from imaginal disc Wingless-expressing cells.
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Differential recognition of a dileucine-based sorting signal by AP-1 and AP-3 reveals a requirement for both BLOC-1 and AP-3 in delivery of OCA2 to melanosomes.
Mol. Biol. Cell
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Cell types that generate unique lysosome-related organelles (LROs), such as melanosomes in melanocytes, populate nascent LROs with cargoes that are diverted from endosomes. Cargo sorting toward melanosomes correlates with binding via cytoplasmically exposed sorting signals to either heterotetrameric adaptor AP-1 or AP-3. Some cargoes bind both adaptors, but the relative contribution of each adaptor to cargo recognition and their functional interactions with other effectors during transport to melanosomes are not clear. Here we exploit targeted mutagenesis of the acidic dileucine-based sorting signal in the pigment cell-specific protein OCA2 to dissect the relative roles of AP-1 and AP-3 in transport to melanosomes. We show that binding to AP-1 or AP-3 depends on the primary sequence of the signal and not its position within the cytoplasmic domain. Mutants that preferentially bound either AP-1 or AP-3 each trafficked toward melanosomes and functionally complemented OCA2 deficiency, but AP-3 binding was necessary for steady-state melanosome localization. Unlike tyrosinase, which also engages AP-3 for optimal melanosomal delivery, both AP-1- and AP-3-favoring OCA2 variants required BLOC-1 for melanosomal transport. These data provide evidence for distinct roles of AP-1 and AP-3 in OCA2 transport to melanosomes and indicate that BLOC-1 can cooperate with either adaptor during cargo sorting to LROs.
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SLC35D3 delivery from megakaryocyte early endosomes is required for platelet dense granule biogenesis and is differentially defective in Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome models.
Blood
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Platelet dense granules are members of a family of tissue-specific, lysosome-related organelles that also includes melanosomes in melanocytes. Contents released from dense granules after platelet activation promote coagulation and hemostasis, and dense granule defects such as those seen in Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) cause excessive bleeding, but little is known about how dense granules form in megakaryocytes (MKs). In the present study, we used SLC35D3, mutation of which causes a dense granule defect in mice, to show that early endosomes play a direct role in dense granule biogenesis. We show that SLC35D3 expression is up-regulated during mouse MK differentiation and is enriched in platelets. Using immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy and subcellular fractionation in megakaryocytoid cells, we show that epitope-tagged and endogenous SLC35D3 localize predominantly to early endosomes but not to dense granule precursors. Nevertheless, SLC35D3 is depleted in mouse platelets from 2 of 3 HPS models and, when expressed ectopically in melanocytes, SLC35D3 localizes to melanosomes in a manner requiring a HPS-associated protein complex that functions from early endosomal transport intermediates. We conclude that SLC35D3 is either delivered to nascent dense granules from contiguous early endosomes as MKs mature or functions in dense granule biogenesis directly from early endosomes, suggesting that dense granules originate from early endosomes in MKs.
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A dual role for K63-linked ubiquitin chains in multivesicular body biogenesis and cargo sorting.
Mol. Biol. Cell
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In yeast, the sorting of transmembrane proteins into the multivesicular body (MVB) internal vesicles requires their ubiquitylation by the ubiquitin ligase Rsp5. This allows their recognition by the ubiquitin-binding domains (UBDs) of several endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) subunits. K63-linked ubiquitin (K63Ub) chains decorate several MVB cargoes, and accordingly we show that they localize prominently to the class E compartment, which accumulates ubiquitylated cargoes in cells lacking ESCRT components. Conversely, yeast cells unable to generate K63Ub chains displayed MVB sorting defects. These properties are conserved among eukaryotes, as the mammalian melanosomal MVB cargo MART-1 is modified by K63Ub chains and partly missorted when the genesis of these chains is inhibited. We show that all yeast UBD-containing ESCRT proteins undergo ubiquitylation and deubiquitylation, some being modified through the opposing activities of Rsp5 and the ubiquitin isopeptidase Ubp2, which are known to assemble and disassemble preferentially K63Ub chains, respectively. A failure to generate K63Ub chains in yeast leads to an MVB ultrastructure alteration. Our work thus unravels a double function of K63Ub chains in cargo sorting and MVB biogenesis.
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Synchronization of secretory protein traffic in populations of cells.
Nat. Methods
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To dissect secretory traffic, we developed the retention using selective hooks (RUSH) system. RUSH is a two-state assay based on the reversible interaction of a hook protein fused to core streptavidin and stably anchored in the donor compartment with a reporter protein of interest fused to streptavidin-binding peptide (SBP). Biotin addition causes a synchronous release of the reporter from the hook. Using the RUSH system, we analyzed different transport characteristics of various Golgi and plasma membrane reporters at physiological temperature in living cells. Using dual-color simultaneous live-cell imaging of two cargos, we observed intra- and post-Golgi segregation of cargo traffic, consistent with observation in other systems. We show preliminarily that the RUSH system is usable for automated screening. The system should help increase the understanding of the mechanisms of trafficking and enable screens for molecules that perturb pathological protein transport.
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Myosin VI regulates actin dynamics and melanosome biogenesis.
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Myosin VI has been implicated in various steps of organelle dynamics. However, the molecular mechanism by which this myosin contributes to membrane traffic is poorly understood. Here, we report that myosin VI is associated with a lysosome-related organelle, the melanosome. Using an actin-based motility assay and video microscopy, we observed that myosin VI does not contribute to melanosome movements. Myosin VI expression regulates instead the organization of actin networks in the cytoplasm. Using a cell-free assay, we showed that myosin VI recruited actin at the surface of isolated melanosomes. Myosin VI is involved in the endocytic-recycling pathway, and this pathway contributes to the transport of a melanogenic enzyme to maturing melanosomes. We showed that depletion of myosin VI accumulated a melanogenic enzyme in enlarged melanosomes and increased their melanin content. We confirmed the requirement of myosin VI to regulate melanosome biogenesis by analysing the morphology of melanosomes in choroid cells from of the Snells waltzer mice that do not express myosin VI. Together, our results provide new evidence that myosin VI regulates the organization of actin dynamics at the surface of a specialized organelle and unravel a novel function of this myosin in regulating the biogenesis of this organelle.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.