JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Identification of a novel MSH6 germline variant in a family with multiple gastro-intestinal malignancies by next generation sequencing.
Fam. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 11-09-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The identification of germline variants that predispose to cancer is important to further our understanding of tumorigenesis, guide patient management, prevent disease in unaffected relatives, and inform best practice for health care. We describe a kindred with multiple gastrointestinal malignancies where a novel MSH6 germline susceptibility variant was identified by exome sequencing after eluding serial routine testing in multiple affected members. This case fosters discussion of our current understanding of DNA mismatch repair deficiency, the management of Lynch Syndrome, and the emerging role of next generation sequencing in laboratory medicine to identify rare pathogenic germline variants in a comprehensive, unbiased fashion.
Related JoVE Video
A two-dimensional pooling strategy for rare variant detection on next-generation sequencing platforms.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
We describe a method for pooling and sequencing DNA from a large number of individual samples while preserving information regarding sample identity. DNA from 576 individuals was arranged into four 12 row by 12 column matrices and then pooled by row and by column resulting in 96 total pools with 12 individuals in each pool. Pooling of DNA was carried out in a two-dimensional fashion, such that DNA from each individual is present in exactly one row pool and exactly one column pool. By considering the variants observed in the rows and columns of a matrix we are able to trace rare variants back to the specific individuals that carry them. The pooled DNA samples were enriched over a 250 kb region previously identified by GWAS to significantly predispose individuals to lung cancer. All 96 pools (12 row and 12 column pools from 4 matrices) were barcoded and sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq 2000 instrument with an average depth of coverage greater than 4,000×. Verification based on Ion PGM sequencing confirmed the presence of 91.4% of confidently classified SNVs assayed. In this way, each individual sample is sequenced in multiple pools providing more accurate variant calling than a single pool or a multiplexed approach. This provides a powerful method for rare variant detection in regions of interest at a reduced cost to the researcher.
Related JoVE Video
Genetic variants in TPMT and COMT are associated with hearing loss in children receiving cisplatin chemotherapy.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 05-15-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Cisplatin is a widely used and effective chemotherapeutic agent, although its use is restricted by the high incidence of irreversible ototoxicity associated with it. In children, cisplatin ototoxicity is a serious and pervasive problem, affecting more than 60% of those receiving cisplatin and compromising language and cognitive development. Candidate gene studies have previously reported associations of cisplatin ototoxicity with genetic variants in the genes encoding glutathione S-transferases and megalin. We report association analyses for 220 drug-metabolism genes in genetic susceptibility to cisplatin-induced hearing loss in children. We genotyped 1,949 SNPs in these candidate genes in an initial cohort of 54 children treated in pediatric oncology units, with replication in a second cohort of 112 children recruited through a national surveillance network for adverse drug reactions in Canada. We identified genetic variants in TPMT (rs12201199, P value = 0.00022, OR = 17.0, 95% CI 2.3-125.9) and COMT (rs9332377, P value = 0.00018, OR = 5.5, 95% CI 1.9-15.9) associated with cisplatin-induced hearing loss in children.
Related JoVE Video
Phylodynamics and dispersal of HRSV entails its permanence in the general population in between yearly outbreaks in children.
PLoS ONE
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is one of the major etiologic agents of respiratory tract infections among children worldwide.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.