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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Obesity and risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma and Barrett's esophagus: a mendelian randomization study.
J. Natl. Cancer Inst.
PUBLISHED: 11-01-2014
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Data from observational studies suggest that body mass index (BMI) is causally related to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) and its precursor, Barrett's esophagus (BE). However, the relationships may be affected by bias and confounding.
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Integrative post-genome-wide association analysis of CDKN2A and TP53 SNPs and risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma.
Carcinogenesis
PUBLISHED: 10-03-2014
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Incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) in Western countries has increased markedly in recent decades. Although several risk factors have been identified for EA and its precursor, Barrett's esophagus (BE), including reflux, Caucasian race, male gender, obesity, and smoking, less is known about the role of inherited genetic variation. Frequent somatic mutations in the tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A and TP53 were recently reported in EA tumors, while somatic alterations at 9p (CDKN2A) and 17p (TP53) have been implicated as predictors of progression from BE to EA. Motivated by these findings, we used data from a genome-wide association study of 2515 EA cases and 3207 controls to analyze 37 germline single nucleotide polymorphisms at the CDKN2A and TP53 loci. Three CDKN2A polymorphisms were nominally associated (P < 0.05) with reduced risk of EA: rs2518720 C>T [intronic, odds ratio 0.90, P = 0.0121, q = 0.3059], rs3088440 G>A (3'UTR, odds ratio 0.84, P = 0.0186, q = 0.3059), and rs4074785 C>T (intronic, odds ratio 0.85, P = 0.0248, q = 0.3059). None of the TP53 single nucleotide polymorphisms reached nominal significance. Two of the CDKN2A variants identified were also associated with reduced risk of progression from BE to EA, when assessed in a prospective cohort of 408 BE patients: rs2518720 (hazard ratio 0.57, P = 0.0095, q = 0.0285) and rs3088440 (hazard ratio 0.34, P = 0.0368, q = 0.0552). In vitro functional studies of rs3088440, a single nucleotide polymorphism located in the seed sequence of a predicted miR-663b binding site, suggested a mechanism whereby the G>A substitution may attenuate miR-663b-mediated repression of the CDKN2A transcript. This study provides the first evidence that germline variation at the CDKN2A locus may influence EA susceptibility.
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Telomere length and mortality following a diagnosis of ovarian cancer.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 08-26-2014
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Telomeres are essential for the maintenance of chromosomal integrity. Telomere shortening leads to genomic instability, which is hypothesized to play a role in cancer development and prognosis. No studies to date have evaluated the prognostic significance of telomere length for ovarian cancer.
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Intrauterine devices and endometrial cancer risk: A pooled analysis of the Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium.
Int. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 07-30-2014
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Intrauterine devices (IUDs), long-acting and reversible contraceptives, induce a number of immunological and biochemical changes in the uterine environment that could affect endometrial cancer (EC) risk. We addressed this relationship through a pooled analysis of data collected in the Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium. We combined individual-level data from 4 cohort and 14 case-control studies, in total 8,801 EC cases and 15,357 controls. Using multivariable logistic regression, we estimated pooled odds ratios (pooled-ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for EC risk associated with ever use, type of device, ages at first and last use, duration of use and time since last use, stratified by study and adjusted for confounders. Ever use of IUDs was inversely related to EC risk (pooled-OR?=?0.81, 95% CI?=?0.74-0.90). Compared with never use, reduced risk of EC was observed for inert IUDs (pooled-OR?=?0.69, 95% CI?=?0.58-0.82), older age at first use (?35 years pooled-OR?=?0.53, 95% CI?=?0.43-0.67), older age at last use (?45 years pooled-OR?=?0.60, 95% CI?=?0.50-0.72), longer duration of use (?10 years pooled-OR?=?0.61, 95% CI?=?0.52-0.71) and recent use (within 1 year of study entry pooled-OR?=?0.39, 95% CI?=?0.30-0.49). Future studies are needed to assess the respective roles of detection biases and biologic effects related to foreign body responses in the endometrium, heavier bleeding (and increased clearance of carcinogenic cells) and localized hormonal changes.
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Imputation and subset-based association analysis across different cancer types identifies multiple independent risk loci in the TERT-CLPTM1L region on chromosome 5p15.33.
Zhaoming Wang, Bin Zhu, Mingfeng Zhang, Hemang Parikh, Jinping Jia, Charles C Chung, Joshua N Sampson, Jason W Hoskins, Amy Hutchinson, Laurie Burdette, Abdisamad Ibrahim, Christopher Hautman, Preethi S Raj, Christian C Abnet, Andrew A Adjei, Anders Ahlbom, Demetrius Albanes, Naomi E Allen, Christine B Ambrosone, Melinda Aldrich, Pilar Amiano, Christopher Amos, Ulrika Andersson, Gerald Andriole, Irene L Andrulis, Cecilia Arici, Alan A Arslan, Melissa A Austin, Dalsu Baris, Donald A Barkauskas, Bryan A Bassig, Laura E Beane Freeman, Christine D Berg, Sonja I Berndt, Pier Alberto Bertazzi, Richard B Biritwum, Amanda Black, William Blot, Heiner Boeing, Paolo Boffetta, Kelly Bolton, Marie-Christine Boutron-Ruault, Paige M Bracci, Paul Brennan, Louise A Brinton, Michelle Brotzman, H Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, Julie E Buring, Mary Ann Butler, Qiuyin Cai, Géraldine Cancel-Tassin, Federico Canzian, Guangwen Cao, Neil E Caporaso, Alfredo Carrato, Tania Carreon, Angela Carta, Gee-Chen Chang, I-Shou Chang, Jenny Chang-Claude, Xu Che, Chien-Jen Chen, Chih-Yi Chen, Chung-Hsing Chen, Constance Chen, Kuan-Yu Chen, Yuh-Min Chen, Anand P Chokkalingam, Lisa W Chu, Francoise Clavel-Chapelon, Graham A Colditz, Joanne S Colt, David Conti, Michael B Cook, Victoria K Cortessis, E David Crawford, Olivier Cussenot, Faith G Davis, Immaculata De Vivo, Xiang Deng, Ti Ding, Colin P Dinney, Anna Luisa Di Stefano, W Ryan Diver, Eric J Duell, Joanne W Elena, Jin-Hu Fan, Heather Spencer Feigelson, Maria Feychting, Jonine D Figueroa, Adrienne M Flanagan, Joseph F Fraumeni, Neal D Freedman, Brooke L Fridley, Charles S Fuchs, Manuela Gago-Dominguez, Steven Gallinger, Yu-Tang Gao, Susan M Gapstur, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Reina Garcia-Closas, Julie M Gastier-Foster, J Michael Gaziano, Daniela S Gerhard, Carol A Giffen, Graham G Giles, Elizabeth M Gillanders, Edward L Giovannucci, Michael Goggins, Nalan Gokgoz, Alisa M Goldstein, Carlos González, Richard Gorlick, Mark H Greene, Myron Gross, H Barton Grossman, Robert Grubb, Jian Gu, Peng Guan, Christopher A Haiman, Göran Hallmans, Susan E Hankinson, Curtis C Harris, Patricia Hartge, Claudia Hattinger, Richard B Hayes, Qincheng He, Lee Helman, Brian E Henderson, Roger Henriksson, Judith Hoffman-Bolton, Chancellor Hohensee, Elizabeth A Holly, Yun-Chul Hong, Robert N Hoover, H Dean Hosgood, Chin-Fu Hsiao, Ann W Hsing, Chao Agnes Hsiung, Nan Hu, Wei Hu, Zhibin Hu, Ming-Shyan Huang, David J Hunter, Peter D Inskip, Hidemi Ito, Eric J Jacobs, Kevin B Jacobs, Mazda Jenab, Bu-Tian Ji, Christoffer Johansen, Mattias Johansson, Alison Johnson, Rudolf Kaaks, Ashish M Kamat, Aruna Kamineni, Margaret Karagas, Chand Khanna, Kay-Tee Khaw, Christopher Kim, In-Sam Kim, Jin Hee Kim, Yeul Hong Kim, Young-Chul Kim, Young Tae Kim, Chang Hyun Kang, Yoo Jin Jung, Cari M Kitahara, Alison P Klein, Robert Klein, Manolis Kogevinas, Woon-Puay Koh, Takashi Kohno, Laurence N Kolonel, Charles Kooperberg, Christian P Kratz, Vittorio Krogh, Hideo Kunitoh, Robert C Kurtz, Nilgun Kurucu, Qing Lan, Mark Lathrop, Ching C Lau, Fernando Lecanda, Kyoung-Mu Lee, Maxwell P Lee, Loic Le Marchand, Seth P Lerner, Donghui Li, Linda M Liao, Wei-Yen Lim, Dongxin Lin, Jie Lin, Sara Lindstrom, Martha S Linet, Jolanta Lissowska, Jianjun Liu, Börje Ljungberg, Josep Lloreta, Daru Lu, Jing Ma, Nuria Malats, Satu Mannisto, Neyssa Marina, Giuseppe Mastrangelo, Keitaro Matsuo, Katherine A McGlynn, Roberta Mckean-Cowdin, Lorna H McNeill, Robert R McWilliams, Beatrice S Melin, Paul S Meltzer, James E Mensah, Xiaoping Miao, Dominique S Michaud, Alison M Mondul, Lee E Moore, Kenneth Muir, Shelley Niwa, Sara H Olson, Nick Orr, Salvatore Panico, Jae Yong Park, Alpa V Patel, Ana Patiño-García, Sofia Pavanello, Petra H M Peeters, Beata Peplonska, Ulrike Peters, Gloria M Petersen, Piero Picci, Malcolm C Pike, Stefano Porru, Jennifer Prescott, Xia Pu, Mark P Purdue, You-Lin Qiao, Preetha Rajaraman, Elio Riboli, Harvey A Risch, Rebecca J Rodabough, Nathaniel Rothman, Avima M Ruder, Jeong-Seon Ryu, Marc Sanson, Alan Schned, Fredrick R Schumacher, Ann G Schwartz, Kendra L Schwartz, Molly Schwenn, Katia Scotlandi, Adeline Seow, Consol Serra, Massimo Serra, Howard D Sesso, Gianluca Severi, Hongbing Shen, Min Shen, Sanjay Shete, Kouya Shiraishi, Xiao-Ou Shu, Afshan Siddiq, Luis Sierrasesúmaga, Sabina Sierri, Alan Dart Loon Sihoe, Debra T Silverman, Matthias Simon, Melissa C Southey, Logan Spector, Margaret Spitz, Meir Stampfer, Pär Stattin, Mariana C Stern, Victoria L Stevens, Rachael Z Stolzenberg-Solomon, Daniel O Stram, Sara S Strom, Wu-Chou Su, Malin Sund, Sook Whan Sung, Anthony Swerdlow, Wen Tan, Hideo Tanaka, Wei Tang, Ze-Zhang Tang, Adonina Tardón, Evelyn Tay, Philip R Taylor, Yao Tettey, David M Thomas, Roberto Tirabosco, Anne Tjonneland, Geoffrey S Tobias, Jorge R Toro, Ruth C Travis, Dimitrios Trichopoulos, Rebecca Troisi, Ann Truelove, Ying-Huang Tsai, Margaret A Tucker, Rosario Tumino, David Van Den Berg, Stephen K Van Den Eeden, Roel Vermeulen, Paolo Vineis, Kala Visvanathan, Ulla Vogel, Chaoyu Wang, Chengfeng Wang, Junwen Wang, Sophia S Wang, Elisabete Weiderpass, Stephanie J Weinstein, Nicolas Wentzensen, William Wheeler, Emily White, John K Wiencke, Alicja Wolk, Brian M Wolpin, Maria Pik Wong, Margaret Wrensch, Chen Wu, Tangchun Wu, Xifeng Wu, Yi-Long Wu, Jay S Wunder, Yong-Bing Xiang, Jun Xu, Hannah P Yang, Pan-Chyr Yang, Yasushi Yatabe, Yuanqing Ye, Edward D Yeboah, Zhihua Yin, Chen Ying, Chong-Jen Yu, Kai Yu, Jian-Min Yuan, Krista A Zanetti, Anne Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Wei Zheng, Baosen Zhou, Lisa Mirabello, Sharon A Savage, Peter Kraft, Stephen J Chanock, Meredith Yeager, Maria Terese Landi, Jianxin Shi, Nilanjan Chatterjee, Laufey T Amundadottir.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-15-2014
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Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have mapped risk alleles for at least 10 distinct cancers to a small region of 63 000 bp on chromosome 5p15.33. This region harbors the TERT and CLPTM1L genes; the former encodes the catalytic subunit of telomerase reverse transcriptase and the latter may play a role in apoptosis. To investigate further the genetic architecture of common susceptibility alleles in this region, we conducted an agnostic subset-based meta-analysis (association analysis based on subsets) across six distinct cancers in 34 248 cases and 45 036 controls. Based on sequential conditional analysis, we identified as many as six independent risk loci marked by common single-nucleotide polymorphisms: five in the TERT gene (Region 1: rs7726159, P = 2.10 × 10(-39); Region 3: rs2853677, P = 3.30 × 10(-36) and PConditional = 2.36 × 10(-8); Region 4: rs2736098, P = 3.87 × 10(-12) and PConditional = 5.19 × 10(-6), Region 5: rs13172201, P = 0.041 and PConditional = 2.04 × 10(-6); and Region 6: rs10069690, P = 7.49 × 10(-15) and PConditional = 5.35 × 10(-7)) and one in the neighboring CLPTM1L gene (Region 2: rs451360; P = 1.90 × 10(-18) and PConditional = 7.06 × 10(-16)). Between three and five cancers mapped to each independent locus with both risk-enhancing and protective effects. Allele-specific effects on DNA methylation were seen for a subset of risk loci, indicating that methylation and subsequent effects on gene expression may contribute to the biology of risk variants on 5p15.33. Our results provide strong support for extensive pleiotropy across this region of 5p15.33, to an extent not previously observed in other cancer susceptibility loci.
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Case-control study of aspirin use and risk of pancreatic cancer.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 06-28-2014
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Pancreas-cancer prognosis is dismal, with 5-year survival less than 5%. Significant relationships between aspirin use and decreased pancreas-cancer incidence and mortality have been shown in four of 13 studies.
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Association between hypermethylation of DNA repetitive elements in white blood cell DNA and pancreatic cancer.
Cancer Epidemiol
PUBLISHED: 06-18-2014
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Pancreatic cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Methylation of DNA may influence risk or be a marker of early disease. The aim of this study was to measure the association between methylation of three DNA repetitive elements in white blood cell (WBC) DNA and pancreatic cancer. DNA from WBCs of pancreatic cancer cases (n=559) and healthy unrelated controls (n=603) were tested for methylation of the LINE-1, Alu and Sat2 DNA repetitive elements using MethyLight quantitative PCR assays. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) between both continuous measures of percent of methylated sample compared to a reference (PMR) or quintiles of PMR and pancreatic cancer, adjusted for age, sex, smoking, BMI, alcohol and higher education, were estimated. The PMR for each of the three markers was higher in cases than in controls, although only LINE-1 was significantly associated with pancreatic cancer (OR per log unit=1.37, 95%CI=1.16-1.63). The marker methylation score for all three markers combined was significantly associated with pancreatic cancer (p-trend=0.0006). There were no associations between measures of PMR and either presence of metastases, or timing of blood collection in relation to diagnosis, surgery, chemotherapy or death (all p>0.1). We observed an association between methylation of LINE-1 in WBC DNA and risk of pancreatic cancer. Further studies are needed to confirm this association.
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Cross-cancer pleiotropic analysis of endometrial cancer: PAGE and E2C2 consortia.
Carcinogenesis
PUBLISHED: 05-15-2014
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Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a large number of cancer-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), several of which have been associated with multiple cancer sites suggesting pleiotropic effects and shared biological mechanisms across some cancers. We hypothesized that SNPs associated with other cancers may be additionally associated with endometrial cancer. We examined 213 SNPs previously associated with 14 other cancers for their associations with endometrial cancer in 3758 endometrial cancer cases and 5966 controls of European ancestry from two consortia: Population Architecture Using Genomics and Epidemiology and the Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium. Study-specific logistic regression estimates adjusted for age, body mass index and the most significant principal components of genetic ancestry were combined using fixed-effect meta-analysis to evaluate the association between each SNP and endometrial cancer risk. A Bonferroni-corrected P value of 2.35×10(-4) was used to determine statistical significance of the associations. SNP rs7679673, ~6.3kb upstream of TET2 and previously reported to be associated with prostate cancer risk, was associated with endometrial cancer risk in the direction opposite to that for prostate cancer [meta-analysis odds ratio = 0.87 (per copy of the C allele), 95% confidence interval = 0.81, 0.93; P = 7.37×10(-5)] with no evidence of heterogeneity across studies (P heterogeneity = 0.66). This pleiotropic analysis is the first to suggest TET2 as a susceptibility locus for endometrial cancer.
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Risk factors for ovarian cancers with and without microsatellite instability.
Int. J. Gynecol. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 04-24-2014
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In a population-based sample of epithelial ovarian cancers, the objective of this study was to evaluate the association between microsatellite instability (MSI) status and the following factors: (1) ovarian cancer risk factors and (2) the distribution of the specific histologic subtypes.
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A new estimation approach for combining epidemiological data from multiple sources.
J Am Stat Assoc
PUBLISHED: 04-01-2014
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We propose a novel two-step procedure to combine epidemiological data obtained from diverse sources with the aim to quantify risk factors affecting the probability that an individual develops certain disease such as cancer. In the first step we derive all possible unbiased estimating functions based on a group of cases and a group of controls each time. In the second step, we combine these estimating functions efficiently in order to make full use of the information contained in data. Our approach is computationally simple and flexible. We illustrate its efficacy through simulation and apply it to investigate pancreatic cancer risks based on data obtained from the Connecticut Tumor Registry, a population-based case-control study, and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System which is a state-based system of health surveys.
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Genome-wide association study identifies multiple susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer.
Brian M Wolpin, Cosmeri Rizzato, Peter Kraft, Charles Kooperberg, Gloria M Petersen, Zhaoming Wang, Alan A Arslan, Laura Beane-Freeman, Paige M Bracci, Julie Buring, Federico Canzian, Eric J Duell, Steven Gallinger, Graham G Giles, Gary E Goodman, Phyllis J Goodman, Eric J Jacobs, Aruna Kamineni, Alison P Klein, Laurence N Kolonel, Matthew H Kulke, Donghui Li, Nuria Malats, Sara H Olson, Harvey A Risch, Howard D Sesso, Kala Visvanathan, Emily White, Wei Zheng, Christian C Abnet, Demetrius Albanes, Gabriella Andreotti, Melissa A Austin, Richard Barfield, Daniela Basso, Sonja I Berndt, Marie-Christine Boutron-Ruault, Michelle Brotzman, Markus W Büchler, H Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, Peter Bugert, Laurie Burdette, Daniele Campa, Neil E Caporaso, Gabriele Capurso, Charles Chung, Michelle Cotterchio, Eithne Costello, Joanne Elena, Niccola Funel, J Michael Gaziano, Nathalia A Giese, Edward L Giovannucci, Michael Goggins, Megan J Gorman, Myron Gross, Christopher A Haiman, Manal Hassan, Kathy J Helzlsouer, Brian E Henderson, Elizabeth A Holly, Nan Hu, David J Hunter, Federico Innocenti, Mazda Jenab, Rudolf Kaaks, Timothy J Key, Kay-Tee Khaw, Eric A Klein, Manolis Kogevinas, Vittorio Krogh, Juozas Kupcinskas, Robert C Kurtz, Andrea LaCroix, Maria T Landi, Stefano Landi, Loic Le Marchand, Andrea Mambrini, Satu Mannisto, Roger L Milne, Yusuke Nakamura, Ann L Oberg, Kouros Owzar, Alpa V Patel, Petra H M Peeters, Ulrike Peters, Raffaele Pezzilli, Ada Piepoli, Miquel Porta, Francisco X Real, Elio Riboli, Nathaniel Rothman, Aldo Scarpa, Xiao-Ou Shu, Debra T Silverman, Pavel Soucek, Malin Sund, Renata Talar-Wojnarowska, Philip R Taylor, George E Theodoropoulos, Mark Thornquist, Anne Tjønneland, Geoffrey S Tobias, Dimitrios Trichopoulos, Pavel Vodicka, Jean Wactawski-Wende, Nicolas Wentzensen, Chen Wu, Herbert Yu, Kai Yu, Anne Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Robert Hoover, Patricia Hartge, Charles Fuchs, Stephen J Chanock, Rachael S Stolzenberg-Solomon, Laufey T Amundadottir.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-26-2014
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We performed a multistage genome-wide association study including 7,683 individuals with pancreatic cancer and 14,397 controls of European descent. Four new loci reached genome-wide significance: rs6971499 at 7q32.3 (LINC-PINT, per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 0.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.74-0.84, P = 3.0 × 10(-12)), rs7190458 at 16q23.1 (BCAR1/CTRB1/CTRB2, OR = 1.46, 95% CI 1.30-1.65, P = 1.1 × 10(-10)), rs9581943 at 13q12.2 (PDX1, OR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.10-1.20, P = 2.4 × 10(-9)) and rs16986825 at 22q12.1 (ZNRF3, OR = 1.18, 95% CI 1.12-1.25, P = 1.2 × 10(-8)). We identified an independent signal in exon 2 of TERT at the established region 5p15.33 (rs2736098, OR = 0.80, 95% CI 0.76-0.85, P = 9.8 × 10(-14)). We also identified a locus at 8q24.21 (rs1561927, P = 1.3 × 10(-7)) that approached genome-wide significance located 455 kb telomeric of PVT1. Our study identified multiple new susceptibility alleles for pancreatic cancer that are worthy of follow-up studies.
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Consortium analysis of gene and gene-folate interactions in purine and pyrimidine metabolism pathways with ovarian carcinoma risk.
Linda E Kelemen, Kathryn L Terry, Marc T Goodman, Penelope M Webb, Elisa V Bandera, Valerie McGuire, Mary Anne Rossing, Qinggang Wang, Ed Dicks, Jonathan P Tyrer, Honglin Song, Jolanta Kupryjanczyk, Agnieszka Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Joanna Plisiecka-Halasa, Agnieszka Timorek, Usha Menon, Aleksandra Gentry-Maharaj, Simon A Gayther, Susan J Ramus, Steven A Narod, Harvey A Risch, John R McLaughlin, Nadeem Siddiqui, Rosalind Glasspool, James Paul, Karen Carty, Jacek Gronwald, Jan Lubiński, Anna Jakubowska, Cezary Cybulski, Lambertus A Kiemeney, Leon F A G Massuger, Anne M Van Altena, Katja K H Aben, Sara H Olson, Irene Orlow, Daniel W Cramer, Douglas A Levine, Maria Bisogna, Graham G Giles, Melissa C Southey, Fiona Bruinsma, Susanne K Kjaer, Estrid Høgdall, Allan Jensen, Claus K Høgdall, Lene Lundvall, Svend-Aage Engelholm, Florian Heitz, Andreas du Bois, Philipp Harter, Ira Schwaab, Ralf Bützow, Heli Nevanlinna, Liisa M Pelttari, Arto Leminen, Pamela J Thompson, Galina Lurie, Lynne R Wilkens, Diether Lambrechts, Els Van Nieuwenhuysen, Sandrina Lambrechts, Ignace Vergote, Jonathan Beesley, , Peter A Fasching, Matthias W Beckmann, Alexander Hein, Arif B Ekici, Jennifer A Doherty, Anna H Wu, Celeste L Pearce, Malcolm C Pike, Daniel Stram, Jenny Chang-Claude, Anja Rudolph, Thilo Dörk, Matthias Dürst, Peter Hillemanns, Ingo B Runnebaum, Natalia Bogdanova, Natalia Antonenkova, Kunle Odunsi, Robert P Edwards, Joseph L Kelley, Francesmary Modugno, Roberta B Ness, Beth Y Karlan, Christine Walsh, Jenny Lester, Sandra Orsulic, Brooke L Fridley, Robert A Vierkant, Julie M Cunningham, Xifeng Wu, Karen Lu, Dong Liang, Michelle A T Hildebrandt, Rachel Palmieri Weber, Edwin S Iversen, Shelley S Tworoger, Elizabeth M Poole, Helga B Salvesen, Camilla Krakstad, Line Bjorge, Ingvild L Tangen, Tanja Pejovic, Yukie Bean, Melissa Kellar, Nicolas Wentzensen, Louise A Brinton, Jolanta Lissowska, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Ian G Campbell, Diana Eccles, Alice S Whittemore, Weiva Sieh, Joseph H Rothstein, Hoda Anton-Culver, Argyrios Ziogas, Catherine M Phelan, Kirsten B Moysich, Ellen L Goode, Joellen M Schildkraut, Andrew Berchuck, Paul D P Pharoah, Thomas A Sellers, Angela Brooks-Wilson, Linda S Cook, Nhu D Le.
Mol Nutr Food Res
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2014
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We reevaluated previously reported associations between variants in pathways of one-carbon (1-C) (folate) transfer genes and ovarian carcinoma (OC) risk, and in related pathways of purine and pyrimidine metabolism, and assessed interactions with folate intake.
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Risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma decreases with height, based on consortium analysis and confirmed by mendelian randomization.
Clin. Gastroenterol. Hepatol.
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2014
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Risks for some cancers increase with height. We investigated the relationship between height and risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) and its precursor, Barrett's esophagus (BE).
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Cigarette smoking and pancreatic cancer risk: more to the story than just pack-years.
Eur. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 01-21-2014
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Cigarette smoking is an established risk factor for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. However, few studies have thoroughly investigated the effects of independent smoking dimensions (duration, intensity, cumulative dose and time since quitting) on risk estimates. We analysed data from the Queensland Pancreatic Cancer Study (QPCS), an Australian population-based case-control study, with the aim of determining which smoking component is primarily important to pancreatic cancer risk.
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Axonal guidance signaling pathway interacting with smoking in modifying the risk of pancreatic cancer: a gene- and pathway-based interaction analysis of GWAS data.
Carcinogenesis
PUBLISHED: 01-13-2014
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Cigarette smoking is the best established modifiable risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Genetic factors that underlie smoking-related pancreatic cancer have previously not been examined at the genome-wide level. Taking advantage of the existing Genome-wide association study (GWAS) genotype and risk factor data from the Pancreatic Cancer Case Control Consortium, we conducted a discovery study in 2028 cases and 2109 controls to examine gene-smoking interactions at pathway/gene/single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) level. Using the likelihood ratio test nested in logistic regression models and ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA), we examined 172 KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) pathways, 3 manually curated gene sets, 3 nicotine dependency gene ontology pathways, 17 912 genes and 468 114 SNPs. None of the individual pathway/gene/SNP showed significant interaction with smoking after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Six KEGG pathways showed nominal interactions (P < 0.05) with smoking, and the top two are the pancreatic secretion and salivary secretion pathways (major contributing genes: RAB8A, PLCB and CTRB1). Nine genes, i.e. ZBED2, EXO1, PSG2, SLC36A1, CLSTN1, MTHFSD, FAT2, IL10RB and ATXN2 had P interaction < 0.0005. Five intergenic region SNPs and two SNPs of the EVC and KCNIP4 genes had P interaction < 0.00003. In IPA analysis of genes with nominal interactions with smoking, axonal guidance signaling $$\left(P=2.12\times 1{0}^{-7}\right)$$ and ?-adrenergic signaling $$\left(P=2.52\times 1{0}^{-5}\right)$$ genes were significantly overrepresented canonical pathways. Genes contributing to the axon guidance signaling pathway included the SLIT/ROBO signaling genes that were frequently altered in pancreatic cancer. These observations need to be confirmed in additional data set. Once confirmed, it will open a new avenue to unveiling the etiology of smoking-associated pancreatic cancer.
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Gastroesophageal reflux in relation to adenocarcinomas of the esophagus: a pooled analysis from the Barrett's and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Consortium (BEACON).
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Previous studies have evidenced an association between gastroesophageal reflux and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA). It is unknown to what extent these associations vary by population, age, sex, body mass index, and cigarette smoking, or whether duration and frequency of symptoms interact in predicting risk. The Barrett's and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Consortium (BEACON) allowed an in-depth assessment of these issues.
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Exome-wide association study of endometrial cancer in a multiethnic population.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Endometrial cancer (EC) contributes substantially to total burden of cancer morbidity and mortality in the United States. Family history is a known risk factor for EC, thus genetic factors may play a role in EC pathogenesis. Three previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have found only one locus associated with EC, suggesting that common variants with large effects may not contribute greatly to EC risk. Alternatively, we hypothesize that rare variants may contribute to EC risk. We conducted an exome-wide association study (EXWAS) of EC using the Infinium HumanExome BeadChip in order to identify rare variants associated with EC risk. We successfully genotyped 177,139 variants in a multiethnic population of 1,055 cases and 1,778 controls from four studies that were part of the Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium (E2C2). No variants reached global significance in the study, suggesting that more power is needed to detect modest associations between rare genetic variants and risk of EC.
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Risk of Ovarian Cancer and the NF-?B Pathway: Genetic association with IL1A and TNFSF10.
Bridget Charbonneau, Matthew S Block, William R Bamlet, Robert A Vierkant, Kimberly R Kalli, Zachary Fogarty, David N Rider, Thomas A Sellers, Shelley S Tworoger, Elizabeth Poole, Harvey A Risch, Helga B Salvesen, Lambertus A Kiemeney, Laura Baglietto, Graham G Giles, Gianluca Severi, Britton Trabert, Nicolas Wentzensen, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, , Alice S Whittemore, Weiva Sieh, Jenny Chang-Claude, Elisa V Bandera, Irene Orlow, Kathryn Terry, Marc T Goodman, Pamela J Thompson, Linda S Cook, Mary Anne Rossing, Roberta B Ness, Steven A Narod, Jolanta Kupryjanczyk, Karen Lu, Ralf Bützow, Thilo Dörk, Tanja Pejovic, Ian Campbell, Nhu D Le, Clareann H Bunker, Natalia Bogdanova, Ingo B Runnebaum, Diana Eccles, James Paul, Anna H Wu, Simon A Gayther, Estrid Hogdall, Florian Heitz, Stanley B Kaye, Beth Y Karlan, Hoda Anton-Culver, Jacek Gronwald, Claus K Hogdall, Diether Lambrechts, Peter A Fasching, Usha Menon, Joellen Schildkraut, Celeste Leigh Pearce, Douglas A Levine, Susanne Krüger Kjaer, Daniel Cramer, James M Flanagan, Catherine M Phelan, Robert Brown, Leon F A G Massuger, Honglin Song, Jennifer A Doherty, Camilla Krakstad, Dong Liang, Kunle Odunsi, Andrew Berchuck, Allan Jensen, Jan Lubiński, Heli Nevanlinna, Yukie T Bean, Galina Lurie, Argyrios Ziogas, Christine Walsh, Evelyn Despierre, Louise Brinton, Alexander Hein, Anja Rudolph, Agnieszka Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Sara H Olson, Philipp Harter, Jonathan Tyrer, Allison F Vitonis, Angela Brooks-Wilson, Katja K Aben, Malcolm C Pike, Susan J Ramus, Elisabeth Wik, Cezary Cybulski, Jie Lin, Lara Sucheston, Robert Edwards, Valerie McGuire, Jenny Lester, Andreas du Bois, Lene Lundvall, Shan Wang-Gohrke, Lukasz M Szafron, Sandrina Lambrechts, Hannah Yang, Matthias W Beckmann, Liisa M Pelttari, Anne M Van Altena, David Van Den Berg, Mari K Halle, Aleksandra Gentry-Maharaj, Ira Schwaab, Urmila Chandran, Janusz Menkiszak, Arif B Ekici, Lynne R Wilkens, Arto Leminen, Francesmary Modugno, Grace Friel, Joseph H Rothstein, Ignace Vergote, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Michelle A T Hildebrandt, Piotr Sobiczewski, Linda E Kelemen, Paul D P Pharoah, Kirsten Moysich, Keith L Knutson, Julie M Cunningham, Brooke L Fridley, Ellen L Goode.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 11-22-2013
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A missense single nucleotide polymorphism in the immune modulatory gene IL1A has been associated with ovarian cancer risk (rs17561), but the functional implications of this polymorphism are undefined. IL-1? is regulated by and activated by NF-?B, a transcription factor family that induces transcription of IL1A along with other pro-inflammatory genes and is an important modifier in carcinogenesis. We therefore tagged SNPs in over 200 genes in the NF-?B pathway for a total of 2,282 SNPs (including rs17561) for genotype analysis of 15,604 cases of ovarian cancer in patients of European descent, including 6,179 of high grade serous (HGS), 2,100 endometrioid, 1,591 mucinous, 1,034 clear cell and 1,016 low grade serous (LGS), including 23,235 control cases spanning 40 studies in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC). In this large population, we confirmed the association between rs17561 and clear cell ovarian cancer (OR=0.84, 95% CI: 0.76-0.93; p=0.00075), which remained intact even after excluding participants in the prior study (OR=0.85, 95% CI: 0.75-0.95; p=0.006). Considering a multiple-testing-corrected significance threshold of p< 2.5x10-5, only one other variant, the TNFSF10 SNP rs6785617, was associated significantly with a risk of ovarian cancer (low malignant potential (LMP) tumors OR=0.85, 95% CI: 0.79-0.91; p=0.00002). Our results extend the evidence that borderline tumors may have a distinct genetic etiology. Further investigation of how these SNPs might modify ovarian cancer associations with other inflammation related risk factors is warranted.
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PPM1D Mutations in Circulating White Blood Cells and the Risk for Ovarian Cancer.
J. Natl. Cancer Inst.
PUBLISHED: 11-21-2013
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We compared the frequency of PPM1D mutation in the white blood cells from 1295 ovarian cancer case patients and 834 control subjects. We found a truncating mutation in 20 case patients vs 1 control subject (odds ratio [OR] = 13.07; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.75 to 97.55; P < .001). The 12-year mortality of the PPM1D-positive case patients was higher than that of the PPM1D-negative case patients (hazard ratio = 2.02; 95% CI = 1.21 to 3.39; P = .007). Three of the 20 PPM1D carrier case patients had a past history of breast cancer compared with 29 of 1129 noncarriers (OR = 6.69; 95% CI = 1.86 to 24.11; P = .007). The lifetime risks for breast or ovarian cancer among female first-degree relatives of PPM1D mutation carriers were not increased compared with that of case patients without mutations. These observations suggest PPM1D mutations in the mosaic state predispose women to breast and ovarian cancer in the absence of a family history of cancer.
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Helicobacter pylori Seropositivities and Risk of Pancreatic Carcinoma.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 11-14-2013
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Pathophysiologic actions of Helicobacter pylori colonization on gastric acidity have been hypothesized to modulate the effect of pancreatic carcinogens, through CagA-negative organism strain type, hyperchlorhydria and increased risk of pancreatic cancer, or CagA-positive strain, hypochlorhydria and decreased risk of pancreatic cancer. We aimed to determine H. pylori strain-specific associations with pancreatic cancer in a population in which colonization by CagA-positive strains is common.
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Germline Genetic Contributions to Risk for Esophageal Adenocarcinoma, Barretts Esophagus, and Gastroesophageal Reflux.
J. Natl. Cancer Inst.
PUBLISHED: 10-29-2013
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Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) is an increasingly common cancer with poor survival. Barretts esophagus (BE) is the main precursor to EA, and every year 0.12% to 0.5% of BE patients progress to EA. BE typically arises on a background of chronic gastroesophageal reflux (GERD), one of the risk factors for EA.
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Genes-Environment Interactions in Obesity- and Diabetes-Associated Pancreatic Cancer: A GWAS Data Analysis.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 10-17-2013
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Obesity and diabetes are potentially alterable risk factors for pancreatic cancer. Genetic factors that modify the associations of obesity and diabetes with pancreatic cancer have previously not been examined at the genome-wide level.
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The Healthy Eating Index 2005 and risk for pancreatic cancer in the NIH-AARP study.
J. Natl. Cancer Inst.
PUBLISHED: 08-15-2013
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Dietary pattern analyses characterizing combinations of food intakes offer conceptual and statistical advantages over food- and nutrient-based analyses of disease risk. However, few studies have examined dietary patterns and pancreatic cancer risk and none focused on the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. We used the Healthy Eating Index 2005 (HEI-2005) to estimate the association between meeting those dietary guidelines and pancreatic cancer risk.
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Dietary energy density is positively associated with risk of pancreatic cancer in urban Shanghai Chinese.
J. Nutr.
PUBLISHED: 07-31-2013
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Regular consumption of energy-dense foods predisposes to obesity and type 2 diabetes, both of which are suggested risk factors for pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate whether energy density of foods is an independent risk factor for pancreatic cancer. In this population-based case-control study in urban Shanghai, 908 patients with pancreatic cancer and 1067 normal controls, aged 35-79 y, were recruited. The energy density for overall diet was calculated from food-frequency questionnaire data. Energy density (adjusted for age, sex, and total energy intake) was significantly higher in cases (6.08 ± 0.04 kJ/g) than in controls (5.91 ± 0.04 kJ/g) (P = 0.003). Energy density was positively associated with pancreatic cancer risk (OR: 1.16 per unit increase; 95% CI: 1.07, 1.27; P < 0.001). In adjusted analysis, the risk of pancreatic cancer was 72% greater (OR: 1.72; 95% CI: 1.25, 2.35; P = 0.001) in the highest quintile of energy density compared with the lowest quintile. In this case-control study, dietary energy density is positively associated with risk of pancreatic cancer. This association should be further investigated in prospective studies.
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Genome-wide association study of subtype-specific epithelial ovarian cancer risk alleles using pooled DNA.
Madalene A Earp, Linda E Kelemen, Anthony M Magliocco, Kenneth D Swenerton, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, , Yi Lu, Alexander Hein, Arif B Ekici, Matthias W Beckmann, Peter A Fasching, Diether Lambrechts, Evelyn Despierre, Ignace Vergote, Sandrina Lambrechts, Jennifer A Doherty, Mary Anne Rossing, Jenny Chang-Claude, Anja Rudolph, Grace Friel, Kirsten B Moysich, Kunle Odunsi, Lara Sucheston-Campbell, Galina Lurie, Marc T Goodman, Michael E Carney, Pamela J Thompson, Ingo B Runnebaum, Matthias Dürst, Peter Hillemanns, Thilo Dörk, Natalia Antonenkova, Natalia Bogdanova, Arto Leminen, Heli Nevanlinna, Liisa M Pelttari, Ralf Bützow, Clareann H Bunker, Francesmary Modugno, Robert P Edwards, Roberta B Ness, Andreas du Bois, Florian Heitz, Ira Schwaab, Philipp Harter, Beth Y Karlan, Christine Walsh, Jenny Lester, Allan Jensen, Susanne K Kjær, Claus K Høgdall, Estrid Høgdall, Lene Lundvall, Thomas A Sellers, Brooke L Fridley, Ellen L Goode, Julie M Cunningham, Robert A Vierkant, Graham G Giles, Laura Baglietto, Gianluca Severi, Melissa C Southey, Dong Liang, Xifeng Wu, Karen Lu, Michelle A T Hildebrandt, Douglas A Levine, Maria Bisogna, Joellen M Schildkraut, Edwin S Iversen, Rachel Palmieri Weber, Andrew Berchuck, Daniel W Cramer, Kathryn L Terry, Elizabeth M Poole, Shelley S Tworoger, Elisa V Bandera, Urmila Chandran, Irene Orlow, Sara H Olson, Elisabeth Wik, Helga B Salvesen, Line Bjorge, Mari K Halle, Anne M Van Altena, Katja K H Aben, Lambertus A Kiemeney, Leon F A G Massuger, Tanja Pejovic, Yukie T Bean, Cezary Cybulski, Jacek Gronwald, Jan Lubiński, Nicolas Wentzensen, Louise A Brinton, Jolanta Lissowska, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Ed Dicks, Joe Dennis, Douglas F Easton, Honglin Song, Jonathan P Tyrer, Paul D P Pharoah, Diana Eccles, Ian G Campbell, Alice S Whittemore, Valerie McGuire, Weiva Sieh, Joseph H Rothstein, James M Flanagan, James Paul, Robert Brown, Catherine M Phelan, Harvey A Risch, John R McLaughlin, Steven A Narod, Argyrios Ziogas, Hoda Anton-Culver, Aleksandra Gentry-Maharaj, Usha Menon, Simon A Gayther, Susan J Ramus, Anna H Wu, Celeste L Pearce, Malcolm C Pike, Agnieszka Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Iwona K Rzepecka, Lukasz M Szafron, Jolanta Kupryjanczyk, Linda S Cook, Nhu D Le, Angela Brooks-Wilson.
Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-17-2013
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Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is a heterogeneous cancer with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Variants influencing the risk of developing the less-common EOC subtypes have not been fully investigated. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of EOC according to subtype by pooling genomic DNA from 545 cases and 398 controls of European descent, and testing for allelic associations. We evaluated for replication 188 variants from the GWAS [56 variants for mucinous, 55 for endometrioid and clear cell, 53 for low-malignant potential (LMP) serous, and 24 for invasive serous EOC], selected using pre-defined criteria. Genotypes from 13,188 cases and 23,164 controls of European descent were used to perform unconditional logistic regression under the log-additive genetic model; odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals are reported. Nine variants tagging six loci were associated with subtype-specific EOC risk at P < 0.05, and had an OR that agreed in direction of effect with the GWAS results. Several of these variants are in or near genes with a biological rationale for conferring EOC risk, including ZFP36L1 and RAD51B for mucinous EOC (rs17106154, OR = 1.17, P = 0.029, n = 1,483 cases), GRB10 for endometrioid and clear cell EOC (rs2190503, P = 0.014, n = 2,903 cases), and C22orf26/BPIL2 for LMP serous EOC (rs9609538, OR = 0.86, P = 0.0043, n = 892 cases). In analyses that included the 75 GWAS samples, the association between rs9609538 (OR = 0.84, P = 0.0007) and LMP serous EOC risk remained statistically significant at P < 0.0012 adjusted for multiple testing. Replication in additional samples will be important to verify these results for the less-common EOC subtypes.
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Association between ultraviolet radiation, skin sun sensitivity and risk of pancreatic cancer.
Cancer Epidemiol
PUBLISHED: 07-11-2013
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Background: Ecological studies showing an inverse association between pancreatic cancer incidence and mortality and levels of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), suggest that higher levels of sun exposure may reduce risks of pancreatic cancer but there has been only one individual-level study that examined this issue. We aimed to examine the association between pancreatic cancer and markers of exposure to solar UVR, namely skin type, treatment of skin lesions, ambient UVR and time outdoors on work days. Methods: We used data from an Australian case-control study. Location at birth, residential location during adulthood, outdoors work, history of skin lesion treatment and sensitivity of the skin to the sun were obtained by questionnaire. We limited the analyses to Caucasians who answered the questionnaire about UVR (controls=589/711 recruited; cases=496/705 recruited). We used NASAs Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer to estimate ambient UVR. Results: Being born in or living in areas of higher ambient UVR (compared to lower ambient UVR) was associated with about 30-40% lower risk of pancreatic cancer. People with fair skin colour had 47% lower risk of pancreatic cancer than those with dark skin colour (95% CI 0.37-0.75). There was some suggestion of increased risk with increased average number of hours spent outside at work. Conclusions: This study suggests that people with light skin colour or those born or living in areas of high ambient UVR have lower risk of pancreatic cancer. Our analysis supports an association between UVR and pancreatic cancer, possibly mediated through production of vitamin D.
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Re-evaluation of ABO gene polymorphisms detected in a genome-wide association study and risk of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in a Chinese population.
Chin J Cancer
PUBLISHED: 07-02-2013
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Pancreatic cancer is a fatal malignancy with an increasing incidence in Shanghai, China. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) and other work have shown that ABO alleles are associated with pancreatic cancer risk. We conducted a population-based case-control study involving 256 patients with pathologically confirmed pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and 548 healthy controls in Shanghai, China, to assess the relationships between GWAS-identified ABO alleles and risk of PDAC. Carriers of the C allele of rs505922 had an increased cancer risk [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.42, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02-1.98] compared to TT carriers. The T alleles of rs495828 and rs657152 were also significantly associated with an elevated cancer risk (adjusted OR = 1.58, 95% CI: 1.17-2.14; OR = 1.51, 95% CI: 1.09-2.10). The rs630014 variant was not associated with risk. We did not find any significant gene-environment interactions with cancer risk using a multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) method. Haplotype analysis also showed that the haplotype CTTC was associated with an increased risk of PDAC (adjusted OR = 1.46, 95% CI: 1.12-1.91) compared with haplotype TGGT. GWAS-identified ABO variants are thus also associated with risk of PDAC in the Chinese population.
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Genome-wide association study of endometrial cancer in E2C2.
Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 06-20-2013
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Endometrial cancer (EC), a neoplasm of the uterine epithelial lining, is the most common gynecological malignancy in developed countries and the fourth most common cancer among US women. Women with a family history of EC have an increased risk for the disease, suggesting that inherited genetic factors play a role. We conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study of Type I EC. Stage 1 included 5,472 women (2,695 cases and 2,777 controls) of European ancestry from seven studies. We selected independent single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that displayed the most significant associations with EC in Stage 1 for replication among 17,948 women (4,382 cases and 13,566 controls) in a multiethnic population (African America, Asian, Latina, Hawaiian and European ancestry), from nine studies. Although no novel variants reached genome-wide significance, we replicated previously identified associations with genetic markers near the HNF1B locus. Our findings suggest that larger studies with specific tumor classification are necessary to identify novel genetic polymorphisms associated with EC susceptibility.
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Genital powder use and risk of ovarian cancer: a pooled analysis of 8,525 cases and 9,859 controls.
Cancer Prev Res (Phila)
PUBLISHED: 06-12-2013
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Genital powder use has been associated with risk of epithelial ovarian cancer in some, but not all, epidemiologic investigations, possibly reflecting the carcinogenic effects of talc particles found in most of these products. Whether risk increases with number of genital powder applications and for all histologic types of ovarian cancer also remains uncertain. Therefore, we estimated the association between self-reported genital powder use and epithelial ovarian cancer risk in eight population-based case-control studies. Individual data from each study were collected and harmonized. Lifetime number of genital powder applications was estimated from duration and frequency of use. Pooled ORs were calculated using conditional logistic regression matched on study and age and adjusted for potential confounders. Subtype-specific risks were estimated according to tumor behavior and histology. 8,525 cases and 9,859 controls were included in the analyses. Genital powder use was associated with a modest increased risk of epithelial ovarian cancer [OR, 1.24; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.15-1.33] relative to women who never used powder. Risk was elevated for invasive serous (OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.09-1.32), endometrioid (OR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.04-1.43), and clear cell (OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.01-1.52) tumors, and for borderline serous tumors (OR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.24-1.72). Among genital powder users, we observed no significant trend (P = 0.17) in risk with increasing number of lifetime applications (assessed in quartiles). We noted no increase in risk among women who only reported nongenital powder use. In summary, genital powder use is a modifiable exposure associated with small-to-moderate increases in risk of most histologic subtypes of epithelial ovarian cancer.
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Risk factors for ovarian cancers with and without microsatellite instability.
Int. J. Gynecol. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 06-11-2013
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The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between microsatellite instability (MSI) status and (1) ovarian cancer risk factors and (2) the distribution of the specific histologic subtypes in a population-based sample of epithelial ovarian cancers.
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Type I and II endometrial cancers: have they different risk factors?
J. Clin. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 06-03-2013
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Endometrial cancers have long been divided into estrogen-dependent type I and the less common clinically aggressive estrogen-independent type II. Little is known about risk factors for type II tumors because most studies lack sufficient cases to study these much less common tumors separately. We examined whether so-called classical endometrial cancer risk factors also influence the risk of type II tumors.
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A genome-wide association study identifies new susceptibility loci for esophageal adenocarcinoma and Barretts esophagus.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 05-16-2013
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Esophageal adenocarcinoma is a cancer with rising incidence and poor survival. Most such cancers arise in a specialized intestinal metaplastic epithelium, which is diagnostic of Barretts esophagus. In a genome-wide association study, we compared esophageal adenocarcinoma cases (n = 2,390) and individuals with precancerous Barretts esophagus (n = 3,175) with 10,120 controls in 2 phases. For the combined case group, we identified three new associations. The first is at 19p13 (rs10419226: P = 3.6 × 10(-10)) in CRTC1 (encoding CREB-regulated transcription coactivator), whose aberrant activation has been associated with oncogenic activity. A second is at 9q22 (rs11789015: P = 1.0 × 10(-9)) in BARX1, which encodes a transcription factor important in esophageal specification. A third is at 3p14 (rs2687201: P = 5.5 × 10(-9)) near the transcription factor FOXP1, which regulates esophageal development. We also refine a previously reported association with Barretts esophagus near the putative tumor suppressor gene FOXF1 at 16q24 and extend our findings to now include esophageal adenocarcinoma.
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Dietary fat intake and risk of pancreatic cancer in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial.
Ann Epidemiol
PUBLISHED: 05-16-2013
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Epidemiologic and experimental studies suggest that dietary fat intake may affect risk of pancreatic cancer, but published results are inconsistent.
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ABO blood group and risk of pancreatic cancer: a study in Shanghai and meta-analysis.
Am. J. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 05-06-2013
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Studies over 5 decades have examined ABO blood groups and risk of pancreatic cancer in Western, Asian, and other populations, though no systematic review has been published. We studied data from 908 pancreatic cancer cases and 1,067 population controls collected during December 2006-January 2011 in urban Shanghai, China, and reviewed the literature for all studies of this association. Random-effects meta-analysis provided summary odds ratio estimates according to blood group and by populations endemic versus nonendemic for cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA)-positive Helicobacter pylori. In our Shanghai study, versus group O, only ABO group A was associated with risk (odds ratio (OR) = 1.60, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.27, 2.03). In 24 pooled studies, group A showed increased risk in both CagA-nonendemic and -endemic populations (ORpooled = 1.40, 95% CI: 1.32, 1.49). In nonendemic populations, groups B and AB were also associated with higher risk (OR = 1.38, 95% CI: 1.16, 1.64; and OR = 1.52, 95% CI: 1.24, 1.85, respectively). However, in CagA-endemic populations, groups B and AB were not associated with risk (OR = 1.05, 95% CI: 0.92, 1.19; and OR = 1.13, 95% CI: 0.92, 1.38, respectively). These population differences were significant. One explanation for contrasts in associations of blood groups B and AB between CagA-endemic and -nonendemic populations could involve gastric epithelial expression of A versus B antigens on colonization behaviors of CagA-positive and CagA-negative H. pylori strains.
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Diet and lifestyle factors and risk of subtypes of esophageal and gastric cancers: classification tree analysis.
Ann Epidemiol
PUBLISHED: 03-07-2013
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Although risk factors for squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus and adenocarcinomas of the esophagus (EA), gastric cardia (GC), and other (noncardia) gastric (OG) sites have been identified, little is known about interactions among risk factors. We sought to examine interactions of diet, other lifestyle, and medical factors with risks of subtypes of esophageal and gastric cancers.
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Epigenetic analysis leads to identification of HNF1B as a subtype-specific susceptibility gene for ovarian cancer.
Hui Shen, Brooke L Fridley, Honglin Song, Kate Lawrenson, Julie M Cunningham, Susan J Ramus, Mine S Cicek, Jonathan Tyrer, Douglas Stram, Melissa C Larson, Martin Köbel, , Argyrios Ziogas, Wei Zheng, Hannah P Yang, Anna H Wu, Eva L Wozniak, Yin Ling Woo, Boris Winterhoff, Elisabeth Wik, Alice S Whittemore, Nicolas Wentzensen, Rachel Palmieri Weber, Allison F Vitonis, Daniel Vincent, Robert A Vierkant, Ignace Vergote, David Van Den Berg, Anne M Van Altena, Shelley S Tworoger, Pamela J Thompson, Daniel C Tessier, Kathryn L Terry, Soo-Hwang Teo, Claire Templeman, Daniel O Stram, Melissa C Southey, Weiva Sieh, Nadeem Siddiqui, Yurii B Shvetsov, Xiao-Ou Shu, Viji Shridhar, Shan Wang-Gohrke, Gianluca Severi, Ira Schwaab, Helga B Salvesen, Iwona K Rzepecka, Ingo B Runnebaum, Mary Anne Rossing, Lorna Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Harvey A Risch, Stefan P Renner, Elizabeth M Poole, Malcolm C Pike, Catherine M Phelan, Liisa M Pelttari, Tanja Pejovic, James Paul, Irene Orlow, Siti Zawiah Omar, Sara H Olson, Kunle Odunsi, Stefan Nickels, Heli Nevanlinna, Roberta B Ness, Steven A Narod, Toru Nakanishi, Kirsten B Moysich, Alvaro N A Monteiro, Joanna Moes-Sosnowska, Francesmary Modugno, Usha Menon, John R McLaughlin, Valerie McGuire, Keitaro Matsuo, Noor Azmi Mat Adenan, Leon F A G Massuger, Galina Lurie, Lene Lundvall, Jan Lubiński, Jolanta Lissowska, Douglas A Levine, Arto Leminen, Alice W Lee, Nhu D Le, Sandrina Lambrechts, Diether Lambrechts, Jolanta Kupryjanczyk, Camilla Krakstad, Gottfried E Konecny, Susanne Krüger Kjaer, Lambertus A Kiemeney, Linda E Kelemen, Gary L Keeney, Beth Y Karlan, Rod Karevan, Kimberly R Kalli, Hiroaki Kajiyama, Bu-Tian Ji, Allan Jensen, Anna Jakubowska, Edwin Iversen, Satoyo Hosono, Claus K Høgdall, Estrid Høgdall, Maureen Hoatlin, Peter Hillemanns, Florian Heitz, Rebecca Hein, Philipp Harter, Mari K Halle, Per Hall, Jacek Gronwald, Martin Gore, Marc T Goodman, Graham G Giles, Aleksandra Gentry-Maharaj, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, James M Flanagan, Peter A Fasching, Arif B Ekici, Robert Edwards, Diana Eccles, Douglas F Easton, Matthias Dürst, Andreas du Bois, Thilo Dörk, Jennifer A Doherty, Evelyn Despierre, Agnieszka Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Cezary Cybulski, Daniel W Cramer, Linda S Cook, Xiaoqing Chen, Bridget Charbonneau, Jenny Chang-Claude, Ian Campbell, Ralf Bützow, Clareann H Bunker, Doerthe Brueggmann, Robert Brown, Angela Brooks-Wilson, Louise A Brinton, Natalia Bogdanova, Matthew S Block, Elizabeth Benjamin, Jonathan Beesley, Matthias W Beckmann, Elisa V Bandera, Laura Baglietto, Francois Bacot, Sebastian M Armasu, Natalia Antonenkova, Hoda Anton-Culver, Katja K Aben, Dong Liang, Xifeng Wu, Karen Lu, Michelle A T Hildebrandt, Joellen M Schildkraut, Thomas A Sellers, David Huntsman, Andrew Berchuck, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Simon A Gayther, Paul D P Pharoah, Peter W Laird, Ellen L Goode, Celeste Leigh Pearce.
Nat Commun
PUBLISHED: 02-21-2013
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HNF1B is overexpressed in clear cell epithelial ovarian cancer, and we observed epigenetic silencing in serous epithelial ovarian cancer, leading us to hypothesize that variation in this gene differentially associates with epithelial ovarian cancer risk according to histological subtype. Here we comprehensively map variation in HNF1B with respect to epithelial ovarian cancer risk and analyse DNA methylation and expression profiles across histological subtypes. Different single-nucleotide polymorphisms associate with invasive serous (rs7405776 odds ratio (OR)=1.13, P=3.1 × 10(-10)) and clear cell (rs11651755 OR=0.77, P=1.6 × 10(-8)) epithelial ovarian cancer. Risk alleles for the serous subtype associate with higher HNF1B-promoter methylation in these tumours. Unmethylated, expressed HNF1B, primarily present in clear cell tumours, coincides with a CpG island methylator phenotype affecting numerous other promoters throughout the genome. Different variants in HNF1B associate with risk of serous and clear cell epithelial ovarian cancer; DNA methylation and expression patterns are also notably distinct between these subtypes. These findings underscore distinct mechanisms driving different epithelial ovarian cancer histological subtypes.
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Identification and molecular characterization of a new ovarian cancer susceptibility locus at 17q21.31.
Jennifer Permuth-Wey, Kate Lawrenson, Howard C Shen, Aneliya Velkova, Jonathan P Tyrer, Zhihua Chen, Hui-Yi Lin, Y Ann Chen, Ya-Yu Tsai, Xiaotao Qu, Susan J Ramus, Rod Karevan, Janet Lee, Nathan Lee, Melissa C Larson, Katja K Aben, Hoda Anton-Culver, Natalia Antonenkova, Antonis C Antoniou, Sebastian M Armasu, , Francois Bacot, Laura Baglietto, Elisa V Bandera, Jill Barnholtz-Sloan, Matthias W Beckmann, Michael J Birrer, Greg Bloom, Natalia Bogdanova, Louise A Brinton, Angela Brooks-Wilson, Robert Brown, Ralf Bützow, Qiuyin Cai, Ian Campbell, Jenny Chang-Claude, Stephen Chanock, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Jin Q Cheng, Mine S Cicek, Gerhard A Coetzee, Linda S Cook, Fergus J Couch, Daniel W Cramer, Julie M Cunningham, Agnieszka Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Evelyn Despierre, Jennifer A Doherty, Thilo Dörk, Andreas du Bois, Matthias Dürst, Douglas F Easton, Diana Eccles, Robert Edwards, Arif B Ekici, Peter A Fasching, David A Fenstermacher, James M Flanagan, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Aleksandra Gentry-Maharaj, Graham G Giles, Rosalind M Glasspool, Jesus Gonzalez-Bosquet, Marc T Goodman, Martin Gore, Bohdan Górski, Jacek Gronwald, Per Hall, Mari K Halle, Philipp Harter, Florian Heitz, Peter Hillemanns, Maureen Hoatlin, Claus K Høgdall, Estrid Høgdall, Satoyo Hosono, Anna Jakubowska, Allan Jensen, Heather Jim, Kimberly R Kalli, Beth Y Karlan, Stanley B Kaye, Linda E Kelemen, Lambertus A Kiemeney, Fumitaka Kikkawa, Gottfried E Konecny, Camilla Krakstad, Susanne Krüger Kjaer, Jolanta Kupryjanczyk, Diether Lambrechts, Sandrina Lambrechts, Johnathan M Lancaster, Nhu D Le, Arto Leminen, Douglas A Levine, Dong Liang, Boon Kiong Lim, Jie Lin, Jolanta Lissowska, Karen H Lu, Jan Lubiński, Galina Lurie, Leon F A G Massuger, Keitaro Matsuo, Valerie McGuire, John R McLaughlin, Usha Menon, Francesmary Modugno, Kirsten B Moysich, Toru Nakanishi, Steven A Narod, Lotte Nedergaard, Roberta B Ness, Heli Nevanlinna, Stefan Nickels, Houtan Noushmehr, Kunle Odunsi, Sara H Olson, Irene Orlow, James Paul, Celeste L Pearce, Tanja Pejovic, Liisa M Pelttari, Malcolm C Pike, Elizabeth M Poole, Paola Raska, Stefan P Renner, Harvey A Risch, Lorna Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Mary Anne Rossing, Anja Rudolph, Ingo B Runnebaum, Iwona K Rzepecka, Helga B Salvesen, Ira Schwaab, Gianluca Severi, Viji Shridhar, Xiao-Ou Shu, Yurii B Shvetsov, Weiva Sieh, Honglin Song, Melissa C Southey, Beata Spiewankiewicz, Daniel Stram, Rebecca Sutphen, Soo-Hwang Teo, Kathryn L Terry, Daniel C Tessier, Pamela J Thompson, Shelley S Tworoger, Anne M Van Altena, Ignace Vergote, Robert A Vierkant, Daniel Vincent, Allison F Vitonis, Shan Wang-Gohrke, Rachel Palmieri Weber, Nicolas Wentzensen, Alice S Whittemore, Elisabeth Wik, Lynne R Wilkens, Boris Winterhoff, Yin Ling Woo, Anna H Wu, Yong-Bing Xiang, Hannah P Yang, Wei Zheng, Argyrios Ziogas, Famida Zulkifli, Catherine M Phelan, Edwin Iversen, Joellen M Schildkraut, Andrew Berchuck, Brooke L Fridley, Ellen L Goode, Paul D P Pharoah, Alvaro N A Monteiro, Thomas A Sellers, Simon A Gayther.
Nat Commun
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2013
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Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) has a heritable component that remains to be fully characterized. Most identified common susceptibility variants lie in non-protein-coding sequences. We hypothesized that variants in the 3 untranslated region at putative microRNA (miRNA)-binding sites represent functional targets that influence EOC susceptibility. Here, we evaluate the association between 767 miRNA-related single-nucleotide polymorphisms (miRSNPs) and EOC risk in 18,174 EOC cases and 26,134 controls from 43 studies genotyped through the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study. We identify several miRSNPs associated with invasive serous EOC risk (odds ratio=1.12, P=10(-8)) mapping to an inversion polymorphism at 17q21.31. Additional genotyping of non-miRSNPs at 17q21.31 reveals stronger signals outside the inversion (P=10(-10)). Variation at 17q21.31 is associated with neurological diseases, and our collaboration is the first to report an association with EOC susceptibility. An integrated molecular analysis in this region provides evidence for ARHGAP27 and PLEKHM1 as candidate EOC susceptibility genes.
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Cigarette smoking and risk of ovarian cancer: a pooled analysis of 21 case-control studies.
Cancer Causes Control
PUBLISHED: 02-11-2013
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The majority of previous studies have observed an increased risk of mucinous ovarian tumors associated with cigarette smoking, but the association with other histological types is unclear. In a large pooled analysis, we examined the risk of epithelial ovarian cancer associated with multiple measures of cigarette smoking with a focus on characterizing risks according to tumor behavior and histology.
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Multiple independent variants at the TERT locus are associated with telomere length and risks of breast and ovarian cancer.
Stig E Bojesen, Karen A Pooley, Sharon E Johnatty, Jonathan Beesley, Kyriaki Michailidou, Jonathan P Tyrer, Stacey L Edwards, Hilda A Pickett, Howard C Shen, Chanel E Smart, Kristine M Hillman, Phuong L Mai, Kate Lawrenson, Michael D Stutz, Yi Lu, Rod Karevan, Nicholas Woods, Rebecca L Johnston, Juliet D French, Xiaoqing Chen, Maren Weischer, Sune F Nielsen, Melanie J Maranian, Maya Ghoussaini, Shahana Ahmed, Caroline Baynes, Manjeet K Bolla, Qin Wang, Joe Dennis, Lesley McGuffog, Daniel Barrowdale, Andrew Lee, Sue Healey, Michael Lush, Daniel C Tessier, Daniel Vincent, Françis Bacot, , Ignace Vergote, Sandrina Lambrechts, Evelyn Despierre, Harvey A Risch, Anna González-Neira, Mary Anne Rossing, Guillermo Pita, Jennifer A Doherty, Nuria Alvarez, Melissa C Larson, Brooke L Fridley, Nils Schoof, Jenny Chang-Claude, Mine S Cicek, Julian Peto, Kimberly R Kalli, Annegien Broeks, Sebastian M Armasu, Marjanka K Schmidt, Linde M Braaf, Boris Winterhoff, Heli Nevanlinna, Gottfried E Konecny, Diether Lambrechts, Lisa Rogmann, Pascal Guénel, Attila Teoman, Roger L Milne, Joaquín J García, Angela Cox, Vijayalakshmi Shridhar, Barbara Burwinkel, Frederik Marme, Rebecca Hein, Elinor J Sawyer, Christopher A Haiman, Shan Wang-Gohrke, Irene L Andrulis, Kirsten B Moysich, John L Hopper, Kunle Odunsi, Annika Lindblom, Graham G Giles, Hermann Brenner, Jacques Simard, Galina Lurie, Peter A Fasching, Michael E Carney, Paolo Radice, Lynne R Wilkens, Anthony Swerdlow, Marc T Goodman, Hiltrud Brauch, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Peter Hillemanns, Robert Winqvist, Matthias Dürst, Peter Devilee, Ingo Runnebaum, Anna Jakubowska, Jan Lubiński, Arto Mannermaa, Ralf Bützow, Natalia V Bogdanova, Thilo Dörk, Liisa M Pelttari, Wei Zheng, Arto Leminen, Hoda Anton-Culver, Clareann H Bunker, Vessela Kristensen, Roberta B Ness, Kenneth Muir, Robert Edwards, Alfons Meindl, Florian Heitz, Keitaro Matsuo, Andreas du Bois, Anna H Wu, Philipp Harter, Soo-Hwang Teo, Ira Schwaab, Xiao-Ou Shu, William Blot, Satoyo Hosono, Daehee Kang, Toru Nakanishi, Mikael Hartman, Yasushi Yatabe, Ute Hamann, Beth Y Karlan, Suleeporn Sangrajrang, Susanne Krüger Kjaer, Valerie Gaborieau, Allan Jensen, Diana Eccles, Estrid Høgdall, Chen-Yang Shen, Judith Brown, Yin Ling Woo, Mitul Shah, Mat Adenan Noor Azmi, Robert Luben, Siti Zawiah Omar, Kamila Czene, Robert A Vierkant, Børge G Nordestgaard, Henrik Flyger, Celine Vachon, Janet E Olson, Xianshu Wang, Douglas A Levine, Anja Rudolph, Rachel Palmieri Weber, Dieter Flesch-Janys, Edwin Iversen, Stefan Nickels, Joellen M Schildkraut, Isabel dos Santos Silva, Daniel W Cramer, Lorna Gibson, Kathryn L Terry, Olivia Fletcher, Allison F Vitonis, C Ellen van der Schoot, Elizabeth M Poole, Frans B L Hogervorst, Shelley S Tworoger, Jianjun Liu, Elisa V Bandera, Jingmei Li, Sara H Olson, Keith Humphreys, Irene Orlow, Carl Blomqvist, Lorna Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Kristiina Aittomäki, Helga B Salvesen, Taru A Muranen, Elisabeth Wik, Barbara Brouwers, Camilla Krakstad, Els Wauters, Mari K Halle, Hans Wildiers, Lambertus A Kiemeney, Claire Mulot, Katja K Aben, Pierre Laurent-Puig, Anne Mvan Altena, Thérèse Truong, Leon F A G Massuger, Javier Benitez, Tanja Pejovic, Jose Ignacio Arias Perez, Maureen Hoatlin, M Pilar Zamora, Linda S Cook, Sabapathy P Balasubramanian, Linda E Kelemen, Andreas Schneeweiss, Nhu D Le, Christof Sohn, Angela Brooks-Wilson, Ian Tomlinson, Michael J Kerin, Nicola Miller, Cezary Cybulski, Brian E Henderson, Janusz Menkiszak, Fredrick Schumacher, Nicolas Wentzensen, Loic Le Marchand, Hannah P Yang, Anna Marie Mulligan, Gord Glendon, Svend Aage Engelholm, Julia A Knight, Claus K Høgdall, Carmel Apicella, Martin Gore, Helen Tsimiklis, Honglin Song, Melissa C Southey, Agnes Jager, Ans M Wvan den Ouweland, Robert Brown, John W M Martens, James M Flanagan, Mieke Kriege, James Paul, Sara Margolin, Nadeem Siddiqui, Gianluca Severi, Alice S Whittemore, Laura Baglietto, Valerie McGuire, Christa Stegmaier, Weiva Sieh, Heiko Muller, Volker Arndt, France Labrèche, Yu-Tang Gao, Mark S Goldberg, Gong Yang, Martine Dumont, John R McLaughlin, Arndt Hartmann, Arif B Ekici, Matthias W Beckmann, Catherine M Phelan, Michael P Lux, Jenny Permuth-Wey, Bernard Peissel, Thomas A Sellers, Filomena Ficarazzi, Monica Barile, Argyrios Ziogas, Alan Ashworth, Aleksandra Gentry-Maharaj, Michael Jones, Susan J Ramus, Nick Orr, Usha Menon, Celeste L Pearce, Thomas Brüning, Malcolm C Pike, Yon-Dschun Ko, Jolanta Lissowska, Jonine Figueroa, Jolanta Kupryjanczyk, Stephen J Chanock, Agnieszka Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Arja Jukkola-Vuorinen, Iwona K Rzepecka, Katri Pylkäs, Mariusz Bidzinski, Saila Kauppila, Antoinette Hollestelle, Caroline Seynaeve, Rob A E M Tollenaar, Katarzyna Durda, Katarzyna Jaworska, Jaana M Hartikainen, Veli-Matti Kosma, Vesa Kataja, Natalia N Antonenkova, Jirong Long, Martha Shrubsole, Sandra Deming-Halverson, Artitaya Lophatananon, Pornthep Siriwanarangsan, Sarah Stewart-Brown, Nina Ditsch, Peter Lichtner, Rita K Schmutzler, Hidemi Ito, Hiroji Iwata, Kazuo Tajima, Chiu-Chen Tseng, Daniel O Stram, David Van Den Berg, Cheng Har Yip, M Kamran Ikram, Yew-Ching Teh, Hui Cai, Wei Lu, Lisa B Signorello, Qiuyin Cai, Dong-Young Noh, Keun-Young Yoo, Hui Miao, Philip Tsau-Choong Iau, Yik Ying Teo, James McKay, Charles Shapiro, Foluso Ademuyiwa, George Fountzilas, Chia-Ni Hsiung, Jyh-Cherng Yu, Ming-Feng Hou, Catherine S Healey, Craig Luccarini, Susan Peock, Dominique Stoppa-Lyonnet, Paolo Peterlongo, Timothy R Rebbeck, Marion Piedmonte, Christian F Singer, Eitan Friedman, Mads Thomassen, Kenneth Offit, Thomas V O Hansen, Susan L Neuhausen, Csilla I Szabo, Ignacio Blanco, Judy Garber, Steven A Narod, Jeffrey N Weitzel, Marco Montagna, Edith Olah, Andrew K Godwin, Drakoulis Yannoukakos, David E Goldgar, Trinidad Caldés, Evgeny N Imyanitov, Laima Tihomirova, Banu K Arun, Ian Campbell, Arjen R Mensenkamp, Christi J van Asperen, Kees E P van Roozendaal, Hanne Meijers-Heijboer, J Margriet Collée, Jan C Oosterwijk, Maartje J Hooning, Matti A Rookus, Rob B van der Luijt, Theo A Mvan Os, D Gareth Evans, Debra Frost, Elena Fineberg, Julian Barwell, Lisa Walker, M John Kennedy, Radka Platte, Rosemarie Davidson, Steve D Ellis, Trevor Cole, Brigitte Bressac-de Paillerets, Bruno Buecher, Francesca Damiola, Laurence Faivre, Marc Frénay, Olga M Sinilnikova, Olivier Caron, Sophie Giraud, Sylvie Mazoyer, Valérie Bonadona, Virginie Caux-Moncoutier, Aleksandra Toloczko-Grabarek, Jacek Gronwald, Tomasz Byrski, Amanda B Spurdle, Bernardo Bonanni, Daniela Zaffaroni, Giuseppe Giannini, Loris Bernard, Riccardo Dolcetti, Siranoush Manoukian, Norbert Arnold, Christoph Engel, Helmut Deissler, Kerstin Rhiem, Dieter Niederacher, Hansjoerg Plendl, Christian Sutter, Barbara Wappenschmidt, Ake Borg, Beatrice Melin, Johanna Rantala, Maria Soller, Katherine L Nathanson, Susan M Domchek, Gustavo C Rodriguez, Ritu Salani, Daphne Gschwantler Kaulich, Muy-Kheng Tea, Shani Shimon Paluch, Yael Laitman, Anne-Bine Skytte, Torben A Kruse, Uffe Birk Jensen, Mark Robson, Anne-Marie Gerdes, Bent Ejlertsen, Lenka Foretova, Sharon A Savage, Jenny Lester, Penny Soucy, Karoline B Kuchenbaecker, Curtis Olswold, Julie M Cunningham, Susan Slager, Vernon S Pankratz, Ed Dicks, Sunil R Lakhani, Fergus J Couch, Per Hall, Alvaro N A Monteiro, Simon A Gayther, Paul D P Pharoah, Roger R Reddel, Ellen L Goode, Mark H Greene, Douglas F Easton, Andrew Berchuck, Antonis C Antoniou, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Alison M Dunning.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-31-2013
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TERT-locus SNPs and leukocyte telomere measures are reportedly associated with risks of multiple cancers. Using the Illumina custom genotyping array iCOGs, we analyzed ?480 SNPs at the TERT locus in breast (n = 103,991), ovarian (n = 39,774) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (n = 11,705) cancer cases and controls. Leukocyte telomere measurements were also available for 53,724 participants. Most associations cluster into three independent peaks. The minor allele at the peak 1 SNP rs2736108 associates with longer telomeres (P = 5.8 × 10(-7)), lower risks for estrogen receptor (ER)-negative (P = 1.0 × 10(-8)) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (P = 1.1 × 10(-5)) breast cancers and altered promoter assay signal. The minor allele at the peak 2 SNP rs7705526 associates with longer telomeres (P = 2.3 × 10(-14)), higher risk of low-malignant-potential ovarian cancer (P = 1.3 × 10(-15)) and greater promoter activity. The minor alleles at the peak 3 SNPs rs10069690 and rs2242652 increase ER-negative (P = 1.2 × 10(-12)) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (P = 1.6 × 10(-14)) breast and invasive ovarian (P = 1.3 × 10(-11)) cancer risks but not via altered telomere length. The cancer risk alleles of rs2242652 and rs10069690, respectively, increase silencing and generate a truncated TERT splice variant.
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GWAS meta-analysis and replication identifies three new susceptibility loci for ovarian cancer.
Paul D P Pharoah, Ya-Yu Tsai, Susan J Ramus, Catherine M Phelan, Ellen L Goode, Kate Lawrenson, Melissa Buckley, Brooke L Fridley, Jonathan P Tyrer, Howard Shen, Rachel Weber, Rod Karevan, Melissa C Larson, Honglin Song, Daniel C Tessier, Francois Bacot, Daniel Vincent, Julie M Cunningham, Joe Dennis, Ed Dicks, , Katja K Aben, Hoda Anton-Culver, Natalia Antonenkova, Sebastian M Armasu, Laura Baglietto, Elisa V Bandera, Matthias W Beckmann, Michael J Birrer, Greg Bloom, Natalia Bogdanova, James D Brenton, Louise A Brinton, Angela Brooks-Wilson, Robert Brown, Ralf Bützow, Ian Campbell, Michael E Carney, Renato S Carvalho, Jenny Chang-Claude, Y Anne Chen, Zhihua Chen, Wong-Ho Chow, Mine S Cicek, Gerhard Coetzee, Linda S Cook, Daniel W Cramer, Cezary Cybulski, Agnieszka Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Evelyn Despierre, Jennifer A Doherty, Thilo Dörk, Andreas du Bois, Matthias Dürst, Diana Eccles, Robert Edwards, Arif B Ekici, Peter A Fasching, David Fenstermacher, James Flanagan, Yu-Tang Gao, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Aleksandra Gentry-Maharaj, Graham Giles, Anxhela Gjyshi, Martin Gore, Jacek Gronwald, Qi Guo, Mari K Halle, Philipp Harter, Alexander Hein, Florian Heitz, Peter Hillemanns, Maureen Hoatlin, Estrid Høgdall, Claus K Høgdall, Satoyo Hosono, Anna Jakubowska, Allan Jensen, Kimberly R Kalli, Beth Y Karlan, Linda E Kelemen, Lambertus A Kiemeney, Susanne Krüger Kjaer, Gottfried E Konecny, Camilla Krakstad, Jolanta Kupryjanczyk, Diether Lambrechts, Sandrina Lambrechts, Nhu D Le, Nathan Lee, Janet Lee, Arto Leminen, Boon Kiong Lim, Jolanta Lissowska, Jan Lubiński, Lene Lundvall, Galina Lurie, Leon F A G Massuger, Keitaro Matsuo, Valerie McGuire, John R McLaughlin, Usha Menon, Francesmary Modugno, Kirsten B Moysich, Toru Nakanishi, Steven A Narod, Roberta B Ness, Heli Nevanlinna, Stefan Nickels, Houtan Noushmehr, Kunle Odunsi, Sara Olson, Irene Orlow, James Paul, Tanja Pejovic, Liisa M Pelttari, Jenny Permuth-Wey, Malcolm C Pike, Elizabeth M Poole, Xiaotao Qu, Harvey A Risch, Lorna Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Mary Anne Rossing, Anja Rudolph, Ingo Runnebaum, Iwona K Rzepecka, Helga B Salvesen, Ira Schwaab, Gianluca Severi, Hui Shen, Vijayalakshmi Shridhar, Xiao-Ou Shu, Weiva Sieh, Melissa C Southey, Paul Spellman, Kazuo Tajima, Soo-Hwang Teo, Kathryn L Terry, Pamela J Thompson, Agnieszka Timorek, Shelley S Tworoger, Anne M Van Altena, David Van Den Berg, Ignace Vergote, Robert A Vierkant, Allison F Vitonis, Shan Wang-Gohrke, Nicolas Wentzensen, Alice S Whittemore, Elisabeth Wik, Boris Winterhoff, Yin Ling Woo, Anna H Wu, Hannah P Yang, Wei Zheng, Argyrios Ziogas, Famida Zulkifli, Marc T Goodman, Per Hall, Douglas F Easton, Celeste L Pearce, Andrew Berchuck, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Edwin Iversen, Alvaro N A Monteiro, Simon A Gayther, Joellen M Schildkraut, Thomas A Sellers.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-30-2013
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Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified four susceptibility loci for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), with another two suggestive loci reaching near genome-wide significance. We pooled data from a GWAS conducted in North America with another GWAS from the UK. We selected the top 24,551 SNPs for inclusion on the iCOGS custom genotyping array. We performed follow-up genotyping in 18,174 individuals with EOC (cases) and 26,134 controls from 43 studies from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium. We validated the two loci at 3q25 and 17q21 that were previously found to have associations close to genome-wide significance and identified three loci newly associated with risk: two loci associated with all EOC subtypes at 8q21 (rs11782652, P = 5.5 × 10(-9)) and 10p12 (rs1243180, P = 1.8 × 10(-8)) and another locus specific to the serous subtype at 17q12 (rs757210, P = 8.1 × 10(-10)). An integrated molecular analysis of genes and regulatory regions at these loci provided evidence for functional mechanisms underlying susceptibility and implicated CHMP4C in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer.
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Polymorphisms in genes related to one-carbon metabolism are not related to pancreatic cancer in PanScan and PanC4.
Cancer Causes Control
PUBLISHED: 01-19-2013
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The evidence of a relation between folate intake and one-carbon metabolism (OCM) with pancreatic cancer (PanCa) is inconsistent. In this study, the association between genes and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related to OCM and PanCa was assessed.
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Obesity and risk of ovarian cancer subtypes: evidence from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium.
Endocr. Relat. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Whilst previous studies have reported that higher BMI increases a womans risk of developing ovarian cancer, associations for the different histological subtypes have not been well defined. As the prevalence of obesity has increased dramatically, and classification of ovarian histology has improved in the last decade, we sought to examine the association in a pooled analysis of recent studies participating in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium. We evaluated the association between BMI (recent, maximum and in young adulthood) and ovarian cancer risk using original data from 15 case-control studies (13?548 cases and 17?913 controls). We combined study-specific adjusted odds ratios (ORs) using a random-effects model. We further examined the associations by histological subtype, menopausal status and post-menopausal hormone use. High BMI (all time-points) was associated with increased risk. This was most pronounced for borderline serous (recent BMI: pooled OR=1.24 per 5?kg/m(2); 95% CI 1.18-1.30), invasive endometrioid (1.17; 1.11-1.23) and invasive mucinous (1.19; 1.06-1.32) tumours. There was no association with serous invasive cancer overall (0.98; 0.94-1.02), but increased risks for low-grade serous invasive tumours (1.13, 1.03-1.25) and in pre-menopausal women (1.11; 1.04-1.18). Among post-menopausal women, the associations did not differ between hormone replacement therapy users and non-users. Whilst obesity appears to increase risk of the less common histological subtypes of ovarian cancer, it does not increase risk of high-grade invasive serous cancers, and reducing BMI is therefore unlikely to prevent the majority of ovarian cancer deaths. Other modifiable factors must be identified to control this disease.
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Clinical impact of unclassified variants of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes.
J. Med. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 10-01-2011
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Women who carry a pathogenic mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 have high risks of developing breast and ovarian cancers. The functional effect of many missense variants on BRCA1 and BRCA2 protein function is not known. Here, the authors construct a historical cohort of 4030 female first-degree relatives of 1345 unselected patients with ovarian cancer who have been screened for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. The authors compared the risks by the age of 80 years for all cancers combined in female first-degree relatives of women with a pathogenic mutation, women with a variant of unknown significance (unclassified variant) and non-carriers. The cumulative risk of cancer among the relatives of patients with a pathogenic mutation was much higher than the risk in relatives of non-carriers (50.2% vs 28.5%; HR=2.87, p<10(-4)). In contrast, the cumulative risk of cancer among relatives of patients carrying an unclassified variant was similar to the risk of cancer for relatives of non-carriers (27.6% vs 28.5%; HR=1.08, p=0.79). The authors used three different algorithms to predict the pathogenicity of unclassified variants and compared their penetrance with non-carriers. In this sample, only Align Grantham Variation Grantham Deviation appeared to predict penetrance based on first-degree relatives.
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Genetic effects and modifiers of radiotherapy and chemotherapy on survival in pancreatic cancer.
Pancreas
PUBLISHED: 04-14-2011
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Germ-line genetic variation may affect clinical outcomes of cancer patients. We applied a candidate-gene approach to evaluate the effect of putative markers on survival of patients with pancreatic cancer. We also examined gene-radiotherapy and gene-chemotherapy interactions, aiming to explain interindividual differences in treatment outcomes.
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LIN28B polymorphisms influence susceptibility to epithelial ovarian cancer.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 04-11-2011
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Defective microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis contributes to the development and progression of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). In this study, we examined the hypothesis that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in miRNA biogenesis genes may influence EOC risk. In an initial investigation, 318 SNPs in 18 genes were evaluated among 1,815 EOC cases and 1,900 controls, followed up by a replicative joint meta-analysis of data from an additional 2,172 cases and 3,052 controls. Of 23 SNPs from 9 genes associated with risk (empirical P < 0.05) in the initial investigation, the meta-analysis replicated 6 SNPs from the DROSHA, FMR1, LIN28, and LIN28B genes, including rs12194974 (G>A), an SNP in a putative transcription factor binding site in the LIN28B promoter region (summary OR = 0.90, 95% CI: 0.82-0.98; P = 0.015) which has been recently implicated in age of menarche and other phenotypes. Consistent with reports that LIN28B overexpression in EOC contributes to tumorigenesis by repressing tumor suppressor let-7 expression, we provide data from luciferase reporter assays and quantitative RT-PCR to suggest that the inverse association among rs12194974 A allele carriers may be because of reduced LIN28B expression. Our findings suggest that variants in LIN28B and possibly other miRNA biogenesis genes may influence EOC susceptibility.
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Inherited variants in mitochondrial biogenesis genes may influence epithelial ovarian cancer risk.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 03-29-2011
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Mitochondria contribute to oxidative stress, a phenomenon implicated in ovarian carcinogenesis. We hypothesized that inherited variants in mitochondrial-related genes influence epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) susceptibility.
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Alcohol intake and risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma: a pooled analysis from the BEACON Consortium.
Gut
PUBLISHED: 03-14-2011
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Alcohol intake is a strong and well established risk factor for oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), but the association with oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OA) or adjacent tumours of the oesophagogastric junction (OGJA), remains unclear. Therefore, the association of alcohol intake with OSCC, OA, and OGJA was determined in nine case-control studies and two cohort studies of the Barretts Esophagus and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Consortium (BEACON).
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Physical activity and breast cancer survival: an epigenetic link through reduced methylation of a tumor suppressor gene L3MBTL1.
Breast Cancer Res. Treat.
PUBLISHED: 03-10-2011
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The study was conducted to determine the effect of physical activity on DNA methylation and to predict the consequence of this effect concerning gene expression and breast cancer survival. Blood samples, collected from 12 breast cancer patients who participated in a randomized clinical trial of exercise, were examined for exercise-related changes in DNA methylation using a methylation microarray. Tumor samples of 348 breast cancer patients were analyzed with qRT-PCR and qMSP to determine gene expression and methylation identified in the microarray analysis. Cox regression models were developed to predict survival outcomes in association with gene expression and methylation. After 6 months of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise, changes in DNA methylation (P < 5 × 10(-5)) in peripheral blood leukocytes were detected in 43 genes from a panel of 14 495. Based on the list, we analyzed gene expression in association with overall survival in breast tumors and found three genes whose methylation was reduced after exercise were favorably in association with overall survival, i.e., higher expression associated with better survival. Of the three genes, L3MBTL1 was a putative tumor suppressor gene with known function to repress chromatin for transcription, which is activated mainly in germline stem cells. Further analyses of tumor features among patients indicated that high expression of L3MBTL1 was associated with low grade and hormone receptor-positive tumors, as well as low risk of disease recurrence and breast cancer death. In conclusion, the study suggests that increasing physical activity after a breast cancer diagnosis may affect epigenetic regulation of tumor suppressor genes, which have favorable impacts on survival outcomes of breast cancer patients.
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Possible association between a genetic polymorphism at 8q24 and risk of upper gastrointestinal cancer.
Eur. J. Cancer Prev.
PUBLISHED: 03-10-2011
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Over recent years, genome-wide association studies have contributed to our understanding of genetic susceptibility to sporadic cancer. In this study, we assessed the association between upper gastrointestinal cancer risk and four genome-wide association studies-identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), implicated earlier in prostate and colorectal cancer susceptibility. Genotyping for each SNP was performed in two independent Caucasian population-based case-control studies. The first study comprised 290 gastric cancer cases and 374 controls. The second study included 185 noncardia gastric cancers, 123 cardia cancers, 158 oesophageal cancers and 209 controls. Odds ratios (ORs) were computed from logistic models and adjusted for potential confounding variables. An inverse association was observed between the SNP rs1447295, located at 8q24, and gastric cancer risk in the first study population (OR=0.63; 95% confidence interval: 0.41-0.97). A positive association was observed for the same SNP and oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma in the second study population (OR=7.43; 95% confidence interval: 1.37-49.98). No significant associations were detected in either study for the three remaining SNPs (rs6983297, rs10505477 and rs719725). Our data represent novel findings on heritable susceptibility to gastric and oesophageal cancer and warrant validation in additional populations.
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Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use reduces risk of adenocarcinomas of the esophagus and esophagogastric junction in a pooled analysis.
Gastroenterology
PUBLISHED: 03-09-2011
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Regular use of aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been reported to reduce risks of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) and esophagogastric junctional adenocarcinoma (EGJA). However, individual studies have been too small to accurately assess the effects of medication type, frequency, or duration of use. We performed a pooled analysis to investigate these associations.
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The role of KRAS rs61764370 in invasive epithelial ovarian cancer: implications for clinical testing.
Paul D P Pharoah, Rachel T Palmieri, Susan J Ramus, Simon A Gayther, Irene L Andrulis, Hoda Anton-Culver, Natalia Antonenkova, Antonis C Antoniou, David Goldgar, , Mary S Beattie, Matthias W Beckmann, Michael J Birrer, Natalia Bogdanova, Kelly L Bolton, Wendy Brewster, Angela Brooks-Wilson, Robert Brown, Ralf Bützow, Trinidad Caldés, Maria Adelaide Caligo, Ian Campbell, Jenny Chang-Claude, Y Ann Chen, Linda S Cook, Fergus J Couch, Daniel W Cramer, Julie M Cunningham, Evelyn Despierre, Jennifer A Doherty, Thilo Dörk, Matthias Dürst, Diana M Eccles, Arif B Ekici, Douglas Easton, Peter A Fasching, Anna de Fazio, David A Fenstermacher, James M Flanagan, Brooke L Fridley, Eitan Friedman, Bo Gao, Olga Sinilnikova, Aleksandra Gentry-Maharaj, Andrew K Godwin, Ellen L Goode, Marc T Goodman, Jenny Gross, Thomas V O Hansen, Paul Harnett, Matti Rookus, Tuomas Heikkinen, Rebecca Hein, Claus Høgdall, Estrid Høgdall, Edwin S Iversen, Anna Jakubowska, Sharon E Johnatty, Beth Y Karlan, Noah D Kauff, Stanley B Kaye, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Linda E Kelemen, Lambertus A Kiemeney, Susanne Krüger Kjaer, Diether Lambrechts, James P LaPolla, Conxi Lazaro, Nhu D Le, Arto Leminen, Karin Leunen, Douglas A Levine, Yi Lu, Lene Lundvall, Stuart MacGregor, Tamara Marees, Leon F Massuger, John R McLaughlin, Usha Menon, Marco Montagna, Kirsten B Moysich, Steven A Narod, Katherine L Nathanson, Lotte Nedergaard, Roberta B Ness, Heli Nevanlinna, Stefan Nickels, Ana Osorio, Jim Paul, Celeste Leigh Pearce, Catherine M Phelan, Malcolm C Pike, Paolo Radice, Mary Anne Rossing, Joellen M Schildkraut, Thomas A Sellers, Christian F Singer, Honglin Song, Daniel O Stram, Rebecca Sutphen, Annika Lindblom, Kathryn L Terry, Ya-Yu Tsai, Anne M Van Altena, Ignace Vergote, Robert A Vierkant, Allison F Vitonis, Christine Walsh, Shan Wang-Gohrke, Barbara Wappenschmidt, Anna H Wu, Argyrios Ziogas, Andrew Berchuck, Harvey A Risch.
Clin. Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 03-08-2011
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An assay for the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs61764370, has recently been commercially marketed as a clinical test to aid ovarian cancer risk evaluation in women with family histories of the disease. rs67164370 is in a 3-UTR miRNA binding site of the KRAS oncogene and is a candidate for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) susceptibility. However, only one published article, analyzing fewer than 1,000 subjects in total, has examined this association.
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Telomerase expression and telomere length in breast cancer and their associations with adjuvant treatment and disease outcome.
Breast Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 02-28-2011
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Telomere length plays important roles in maintaining genome stability and regulating cell replication and death. Telomerase has functions not only to extend telomere length but also to repair DNA damage. Studies have shown that telomerase may increase cancer cell resistance to DNA-damaging anticancer agents; tamoxifen may suppress telomerase expression in breast cancer cells. This study aimed to investigate the role of telomere length and telomerase activity in breast cancer prognosis.
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A population-based case-control study of occupational exposure to acids and the risk of lung cancer: evidence for specificity of association.
Int J Occup Environ Health
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2011
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Occupational exposure to strong inorganic acid mists containing sulfuric acid has been recognized as a carcinogen (Group 1) since 1992. An augmented, secondary data analysis of a population-based case-control study of lung cancer was conducted to assess lung cancer-specific risks using 772 lung cancer cases diagnosed between 1981 and 1985. Individually matched controls--on age, gender, and borough of residence--were identified. Lifetime exposure to 10 acidic agents, including strong inorganic acids and some gases, was assessed from complete lifetime occupational histories in terms of concentration, frequency, and reliability of the various exposure assessments. Smoking-adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were determined for overall and histology-categorized lung cancers using conditional logistic regression. No excess risk for overall lung cancer was associated with any of the acids, and effect modification by gender could not be identified. The absence of an acid lung cancer effect reinforces more recent toxicological data that suggest specificity to the larynx.
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Long-term overweight and weight gain in early adulthood in association with risk of endometrial cancer.
Int. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 02-15-2011
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Long-term overweight and substantial weight gain over adulthood are known risk factors of endometrial cancer, but the timing of weight gain in relation to risk and the effect of weight change on age at diagnosis remain unclear. A population-based case-control study was conducted to evaluate the long-term effect of body weight on endometrial cancer risk. The study enrolled 668 incident cases and 674 population controls. Anthropometric features in each decade of adult life were ascertained through in-person interview and analyzed for their associations with endometrial cancer using unconditional logistic regression. As expected, high body mass index (BMI) was significantly associated with increased risk. Women who were overweight or obese at the time of interview had adjusted odds ratios of 1.54 (95%CI 1.13-2.10) and 4.76 (95%CI 3.50-6.49), respectively, compared to women of normal weight. Similar associations were observed for BMI assessed at each decade of adult life. More importantly, women who were overweight (BMI ? 25) in their 20s or 30s and maintained the overweight throughout life had significantly higher risk than those who became overweight at ages 40s or 50s. Women with substantial weight gain (?35%) in early adulthood (age 20s) developed the disease 10 years earlier than those without such weight change in early life. These observations further confirm the critical link between body weight and development of endometrial cancer.
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Frequencies of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations among 1,342 unselected patients with invasive ovarian cancer.
Gynecol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 01-12-2011
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The heritable fraction of ovarian cancer exceeds that of any other common adult cancer. Most inherited cases of ovarian cancer are due to a germline mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2. It is important to have an accurate estimate of the proportion of ovarian cancer patients who carry a mutation and the specific factors which predict the presence of a mutation.
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Genetic variation in the prostate stem cell antigen gene and upper gastrointestinal cancer in white individuals.
Gastroenterology
PUBLISHED: 09-23-2010
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An association between gastric cancer and the rs2294008 (C>T) polymorphism in the prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) gene has been reported for several Asian populations. We set out to determine whether such an association exists in white individuals.
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Physical activity and endometrial cancer in a population-based case-control study.
Cancer Causes Control
PUBLISHED: 09-14-2010
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Published studies of physical activity, BMI, and endometrial cancer risk show conflicting results and many do not report on reliability or validity of physical activity questionnaires.
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Cigarette smoking and adenocarcinomas of the esophagus and esophagogastric junction: a pooled analysis from the international BEACON consortium.
J. Natl. Cancer Inst.
PUBLISHED: 08-17-2010
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Previous studies that showed an association between smoking and adenocarcinomas of the esophagus and esophagogastric junction were limited in their ability to assess differences by tumor site, sex, dose-response, and duration of cigarette smoking cessation.
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Pre- and post-diagnosis body mass index, weight change, and ovarian cancer mortality.
Gynecol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 07-30-2010
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The purpose of this study was (1) to investigate the association between BMI self-reported at three time points (during their 20s, 5 years before diagnosis, and post-diagnosis) and mortality among 388 women with newly diagnosed epithelial ovarian cancer and (2) weight change between these 3 time points and mortality.
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Let-7a regulation of insulin-like growth factors in breast cancer.
Breast Cancer Res. Treat.
PUBLISHED: 07-28-2010
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Expression of certain microRNA genes is regulated by DNA methylation, which in turn affects the activities of their downstream molecules. Our previous study showed that methylated let-7a-3 was associated with low IGF-II expression and favorable prognosis of ovarian cancer. The roles of let-7a-3 methylation in breast cancer and in regulation of IGF expression in the tumor are still unknown. Let-7a-3 methylation, IGF mRNAs, and peptides were analyzed in 348 breast cancer samples using quantitative methylation-specific PCR, qRT-PCR, and ELISA, respectively. The associations of let-7a-3 methylation with IGFs, disease features, and patient survivals were analyzed. In vitro experiments were performed using HeLa cells transfected with let-7a precursors to assess the effect of let-7a on IGF expression. Let-7a-3 methylation was detected frequently in breast cancer. An inverse correlation between let-7a-3 methylation and IGF expression was observed in breast cancer, which was similar to that seen in ovarian cancer. Our in vitro experiment showed that let-7a could increase IGF expression in cancer cells which had low endogenous let-7a. Let-7a-3 methylation was also found to be associated with high grade tumors and ER- or PR-negative cancer. However, let-7a-3 methylation was not associated with disease-free survival or overall survival of breast cancer patients. The study provides further evidence in support of the notion that epigenetic regulation of let-7a-3 may affect the actions of IGFs in cancer. Let-7a may up-regulate the expression of IGFs in cancer cells, which is different from its inhibitory effects on other oncogenes.
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A KRAS-variant in ovarian cancer acts as a genetic marker of cancer risk.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 07-20-2010
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Ovarian cancer (OC) is the single most deadly form of womens cancer, typically presenting as an advanced disease at diagnosis in part due to a lack of known risk factors or genetic markers of risk. The KRAS oncogene and altered levels of the microRNA (miRNA) let-7 are associated with an increased risk of developing solid tumors. In this study, we investigated a hypothesized association between an increased risk of OC and a variant allele of KRAS at rs61764370, referred to as the KRAS-variant, which disrupts a let-7 miRNA binding site in this oncogene. Specimens obtained were tested for the presence of the KRAS-variant from nonselected OC patients in three independent cohorts, two independent ovarian case-control studies, and OC patients with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC) as well as their family members. Our results indicate that the KRAS-variant is associated with more than 25% of nonselected OC cases. Further, we found that it is a marker for a significant increased risk of developing OC, as confirmed by two independent case-control analyses. Lastly, we determined that the KRAS-variant was present in 61% of HBOC patients without BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, previously considered uninformative, as well as in their family members with cancer. Our findings strongly support the hypothesis that the KRAS-variant is a genetic marker for increased risk of developing OC, and they suggest that the KRAS-variant may be a new genetic marker of cancer risk for HBOC families without other known genetic abnormalities.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.