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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Immune modulation by butyrophilins.
Nat. Rev. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 07-26-2014
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The B7 family of co-stimulatory molecules has an important role in driving the activation and inhibition of immune cells. Evolving data have shown that a related family of molecules - the butyrophilins - have similar immunomodulatory functions to B7 family members and may represent a novel subset of co-stimulatory molecules. These studies have taken the field by surprise, as the butyrophilins were previously thought to only be important in lactation and milk production. In this Review, we describe the expression patterns of the various members of the butyrophilin family and explore their immunomodulatory functions. In particular, we emphasize the contribution of butyrophilins to immune homeostasis and discuss the potential of targeting these molecules for therapeutic purposes.
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Butyrophilin-like 2 modulates B7 costimulation to induce Foxp3 expression and regulatory T cell development in mature T cells.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2013
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Naive T cell activation involves at least two signals from an APC, one through the TCR via interaction with peptide-MHC complexes and a second through ligation of CD28 with B7 ligands. Following activation, T cells upregulate a host of other membrane-bound costimulatory molecules that can either promote or inhibit further T cell maturation and proliferation. In some cases, it is necessary to attenuate T cell activation to prevent deleterious inflammation, and inhibitory members of the B7/butyrophilin family of ligands have evolved to balance the strong stimuli the activating B7 ligands confer. Human genetic association and in vitro studies have implicated one such ligand, BTNL2, in controlling inflammation at mucosal surfaces. In this study, we show that recombinant mouse BTNL2 modifies B7/CD28 signaling to promote expression of Foxp3, a transcription factor necessary for regulatory T cell (Treg) development and function. BTNL2 blocks Akt-mediated inactivation of Foxo1, a transcription factor necessary for Foxp3 expression. Immunophenotyping and gene profiling reveal that BTNL2-induced Treg share many properties with natural Treg, and in vivo they suppress enteritis induced by mouse effector T cells. These findings describe a mechanism by which environmental Ag-specific Tregs may be induced by APC expressing specific modulators of costimulatory signals.
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Protein tyrosine phosphatase expression profile of rheumatoid arthritis fibroblast-like synoviocytes: a novel role of SH2 domain-containing phosphatase 2 as a modulator of invasion and survival.
Arthritis Rheum.
PUBLISHED: 01-10-2013
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The fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) in the synovial intimal lining of the joint are key mediators of inflammation and joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In RA, these cells aggressively invade the extracellular matrix, producing cartilage-degrading proteases and inflammatory cytokines. The behavior of FLS is controlled by multiple interconnected signal transduction pathways involving reversible phosphorylation of proteins on tyrosine residues. However, little is known about the role of the protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) in FLS function. This study was undertaken to explore the expression of all of the PTP genes (the PTPome) in FLS.
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Quinolinone-based agonists of S1P?: use of a N-scan SAR strategy to optimize in vitro and in vivo activity.
Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 10-04-2011
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We reveal how a N-scan SAR strategy (systematic substitution of each CH group with a N atom) was employed for quinolinone-based S1P(1) agonist 5 to modulate physicochemical properties and optimize in vitro and in vivo activity. The diaza-analog 17 displays improved potency (hS1P(1) RI; 17: EC(50)=0.020 ?M, 120% efficacy; 5: EC(50)=0.070 ?M, 110% efficacy) and selectivity (hS1P(3) Ca(2+) flux; 17: EC(50) >25 ?M; 5: EC(50)=1.5 ?M, 92% efficacy), as well as enhanced pharmacokinetics (17: CL=0.15 L/h/kg, V(dss)=5.1L/kg, T(1/2)=24h, %F=110; 5: CL=0.93L/h/kg, V(dss)=11L/kg, T(1/2)=15 h, %F=60) and pharmacodynamics (17: 1.0mg/kg po, 24h PLC POC=-67%; 5: 3mg/kg po, 24h PLC POC=-51%) in rat.
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Loss of the receptor tyrosine kinase Axl leads to enhanced inflammation in the CNS and delayed removal of myelin debris during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.
J Neuroinflammation
PUBLISHED: 05-15-2011
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Axl, together with Tyro3 and Mer, constitute the TAM family of receptor tyrosine kinases. In the nervous system, Axl and its ligand Growth-arrest-specific protein 6 (Gas6) are expressed on multiple cell types. Axl functions in dampening the immune response, regulating cytokine secretion, clearing apoptotic cells and debris, and maintaining cell survival. Axl is upregulated in various disease states, such as in the cuprizone toxicity-induced model of demyelination and in multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions, suggesting that it plays a role in disease pathogenesis. To test for this, we studied the susceptibility of Axl-/- mice to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for multiple sclerosis.
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Diverse functions of reactive cysteines facilitate unique biosynthetic processes of aggregate-prone interleukin-31.
Exp. Cell Res.
PUBLISHED: 09-10-2010
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Interleukin-31 (IL-31) is a member of the four helical-bundle gp130/IL-6 cytokine family. Despite its implicated roles in inflammatory diseases, the biosynthetic processes of IL-31 have been poorly investigated. A detailed understanding of IL-31 biosynthesis and the nature of ligand-receptor interactions can provide insights into effective strategies for the design of therapeutic approaches. By using various heterologous protein expression systems, we demonstrated that murine IL-31 was secreted as inter-molecularly disulfide-bonded covalent aggregates. Covalently aggregated IL-31 appeared while trafficking in the secretory pathway, but was not actively retained in the ER. The aggregate formation was not caused by a dysfunctional ER quality control mechanism or an intrinsic limitation in protein folding capacity. Furthermore, secreted IL-31 aggregates were part of a large complex composed of various pleiotropic secretory factors and immune-stimulators. The extent and the heterogeneous nature of aggregates may imply that IL-31 was erroneously folded, but it was capable of signaling through cognate receptors. Mutagenesis revealed the promiscuity of all five cysteines in inter-molecular disulfide formation with components of the hetero-aggregates, but no cysteine was required for IL-31 secretion itself. Our present study not only illustrated various functions that cysteines perform during IL-31 biosynthesis and secretion, but also highlighted their potential roles in cytokine effector functions.
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Melting Alpine glaciers enrich high-elevation lakes with reactive nitrogen.
Environ. Sci. Technol.
PUBLISHED: 06-10-2010
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Alpine glaciers have receded substantially over the last century in many regions of the world. Resulting changes in glacial runoff not only affect the hydrological cycle, but can also alter the physical (i.e., turbidity from glacial flour) and biogeochemical properties of downstream ecosystems. Here we compare nutrient concentrations, transparency gradients, algal biomass, and fossil diatom species richness in two sets of high-elevation lakes: those fed by snowpack melt alone (SF lakes) and those fed by both glacial and snowpack meltwaters (GSF lakes). We found that nitrate (NO(3)(-)) concentrations in the GSF lakes were 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than in SF lakes. Although nitrogen (N) limitation is common in alpine lakes, algal biomass was lower in highly N-enriched GSF lakes than in the N-poor SF lakes. Contrary to expectations, GSF lakes were more transparent than SF lakes to ultraviolet and equally transparent to photosynthetically active radiation. Sediment diatom assemblages had lower taxonomic richness in the GSF lakes, a feature that has persisted over the last century. Our results demonstrate that the presence of glaciers on alpine watersheds more strongly influences NO(3)(-)concentrations in high-elevation lake ecosystems than any other geomorphic or biogeographic characteristic.
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Gatekeepers of intestinal inflammation.
Inflamm. Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-13-2010
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The intestine is subjected to a barrage of insults from food, bacterial flora, and pathogens. Despite this constant antigenic challenge, the mucosal tissues lining the intestinal tract remain largely under control. The mechanisms regulating the homeostatic balance in the gut have been investigated for many years by many groups, but the precise nature of the regulatory control remains elusive. In this review, we provide an overview of pathways proposed to be involved in dampening the inflammatory response and maintaining the homeostatic balance in the intestine, and how these pathways may be disrupted in ulcerative colitis and Crohns disease.
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The oligodendrocyte-specific G protein-coupled receptor GPR17 is a cell-intrinsic timer of myelination.
Nat. Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 06-25-2009
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The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Olig1 promotes oligodendrocyte maturation and is required for myelin repair. We characterized an Olig1-regulated G protein-coupled receptor, GPR17, whose function is to oppose the action of Olig1. Gpr17 was restricted to oligodendrocyte lineage cells, but was downregulated during the peak period of myelination and in adulthood. Transgenic mice with sustained Gpr17 expression in oligodendrocytes exhibited stereotypic features of myelinating disorders in the CNS. Gpr17 overexpression inhibited oligodendrocyte differentiation and maturation both in vivo and in vitro. Conversely, Gpr17 knockout mice showed early onset of oligodendrocyte myelination. The opposing action of Gpr17 on oligodendrocyte maturation reflects, at least partially, upregulation and nuclear translocation of the potent oligodendrocyte differentiation inhibitors ID2/4. Collectively, these findings suggest that GPR17 orchestrates the transition between immature and myelinating oligodendrocytes via an ID protein-mediated negative regulation and may serve as a potential therapeutic target for CNS myelin repair.
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Recent developments in IBD and the B7 family of costimulatory molecules.
Curr Opin Investig Drugs
PUBLISHED: 05-12-2009
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The cells and tissues of the intestinal tract are subjected to a constant onslaught of antigenic challenge from both beneficial and harmful pathogens. Despite this constant stimulation, the host is able to maintain a relatively stable environment, often referred to as a controlled state of inflammation. In patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease, this controlled state of inflammation is lost. The cause of this loss of control is not fully understood, but there is emerging research interest in positive and negative costimulatory pathways as potential targets for modulating the dysregulation. This review describes the B7 and B7-like butyrophilin families of costimulatory molecules, with an emphasis on the role of costimulation in intestinal inflammation.
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Regulation of costimulation in the era of butyrophilins.
Cytokine
PUBLISHED: 01-21-2009
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The butyrophilin and butyrophilin-like superfamily of molecules has garnered attention in the immunology world in the past few years as a result of the observation that the butyrophilin-like 2 molecule, BTNL2, can alter T cell responsiveness. Additional interest in this superfamily solidified following the discovery that genetic polymorphisms in BTNL2 are associated with predisposition to many human diseases. In this review, we will provide an overview of the members comprising the butyrophilin superfamily of molecules. We will then discuss BTNL2 immunomodulatory function, and BTNL2 structural associations with other costimulatory molecules. We will then draw your attention to some of the lesser-known butyrophilin superfamily members by describing the expression patterns of these molecules in human tissues and cells. And we will finish by hypothesizing on the potential influence on general immune homeostasis that might be mediated by this, thus-far little-studied, family of molecules.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.