JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Physiological and genomic features of a novel sulfur-oxidizing gammaproteobacterium belonging to a previously uncultivated symbiotic lineage isolated from a hydrothermal vent.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 08-18-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Strain Hiromi 1, a sulfur-oxidizing gammaproteobacterium was isolated from a hydrothermal vent chimney in the Okinawa Trough and represents a novel genus that may include a phylogenetic group found as endosymbionts of deep-sea gastropods. The SSU rRNA gene sequence similarity between strain Hiromi 1 and the gastropod endosymbionts was approximately 97%. The strain was shown to grow both chemolithoautotrophically and chemolithoheterotrophically with an energy metabolism of sulfur oxidation and O2 or nitrate reduction. Under chemolithoheterotrophic growth conditions, the strain utilized organic acids and proteinaceous compounds as the carbon and/or nitrogen sources but not the energy source. Various sugars did not support growth as a sole carbon source. The observation of chemolithoheterotrophy in this strain is in line with metagenomic analyses of endosymbionts suggesting the occurrence of chemolithoheterotrophy in gammaproteobacterial symbionts. Chemolithoheterotrophy and the presence of homologous genes for virulence- and quorum sensing-related functions suggest that the sulfur-oxidizing chomolithotrophic microbes seek animal bodies and microbial biofilm formation to obtain supplemental organic carbons in hydrothermal ecosystems.
Related JoVE Video
Isolation and characterization of a thermophilic, obligately anaerobic and heterotrophic marine Chloroflexi bacterium from a Chloroflexi-dominated microbial community associated with a Japanese shallow hydrothermal system, and proposal for Thermomarinilin
Microbes Environ.
PUBLISHED: 05-11-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
A novel marine thermophilic and heterotrophic Anaerolineae bacterium in the phylum Chloroflexi, strain SW7(T), was isolated from an in situ colonization system deployed in the main hydrothermal vent of the Taketomi submarine hot spring field located on the southern part of Yaeyama Archipelago, Japan. The microbial community associated with the hydrothermal vent was predominated by thermophilic heterotrophs such as Thermococcaceae and Anaerolineae, and the next dominant population was thermophilic sulfur oxidizers. Both aerobic and anaerobic hydrogenotrophs including methanogens were detected as minor populations. During the culture-dependent viable count analysis in this study, an Anaerolineae strain SW7(T) was isolated from an enrichment culture at a high dilution rate. Strain SW7(T) was an obligately anaerobic heterotroph that grew with fermentation and had non-motile thin rods 3.5-16.5 ?m in length and 0.2 ?m in width constituting multicellular filaments. Growth was observed between 37-65°C (optimum 60°C), pH 5.5-7.3 (optimum pH 6.0), and 0.5-3.5% (w/v) NaCl concentration (optimum 1.0%). Based on the physiological and phylogenetic features of a new isolate, we propose a new species representing a novel genus Thermomarinilinea: the type strain of Thermomarinilinea lacunofontalis sp. nov., is SW7(T) (=JCM15506(T)=KCTC5908(T)).
Related JoVE Video
Spatial distribution of viruses associated with planktonic and attached microbial communities in hydrothermal environments.
Appl. Environ. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 12-30-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Viruses play important roles in marine surface ecosystems, but little is known about viral ecology and virus-mediated processes in deep-sea hydrothermal microbial communities. In this study, we examined virus-like particle (VLP) abundances in planktonic and attached microbial communities, which occur in physical and chemical gradients in both deep and shallow submarine hydrothermal environments (mixing waters between hydrothermal fluids and ambient seawater and dense microbial communities attached to chimney surface areas or macrofaunal bodies and colonies). We found that viruses were widely distributed in a variety of hydrothermal microbial habitats, with the exception of the interior parts of hydrothermal chimney structures. The VLP abundance and VLP-to-prokaryote ratio (VPR) in the planktonic habitats increased as the ratio of hydrothermal fluid to mixing water increased. On the other hand, the VLP abundance in attached microbial communities was significantly and positively correlated with the whole prokaryotic abundance; however, the VPRs were always much lower than those for the surrounding hydrothermal waters. This is the first report to show VLP abundance in the attached microbial communities of submarine hydrothermal environments, which presented VPR values significantly lower than those in planktonic microbial communities reported before. These results suggested that viral lifestyles (e.g., lysogenic prevalence) and virus interactions with prokaryotes are significantly different among the planktonic and attached microbial communities that are developing in the submarine hydrothermal environments.
Related JoVE Video
Insights into the evolution of Archaea and eukaryotic protein modifier systems revealed by the genome of a novel archaeal group.
Nucleic Acids Res.
PUBLISHED: 12-15-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The domain Archaea has historically been divided into two phyla, the Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Although regarded as members of the Crenarchaeota based on small subunit rRNA phylogeny, environmental genomics and efforts for cultivation have recently revealed two novel phyla/divisions in the Archaea; the Thaumarchaeota and Korarchaeota. Here, we show the genome sequence of Candidatus Caldiarchaeum subterraneum that represents an uncultivated crenarchaeotic group. A composite genome was reconstructed from a metagenomic library previously prepared from a microbial mat at a geothermal water stream of a sub-surface gold mine. The genome was found to be clearly distinct from those of the known phyla/divisions, Crenarchaeota (hyperthermophiles), Euryarchaeota, Thaumarchaeota and Korarchaeota. The unique traits suggest that this crenarchaeotic group can be considered as a novel archaeal phylum/division. Moreover, C. subterraneum harbors an ubiquitin-like protein modifier system consisting of Ub, E1, E2 and small Zn RING finger family protein with structural motifs specific to eukaryotic system proteins, a system clearly distinct from the prokaryote-type system recently identified in Haloferax and Mycobacterium. The presence of such a eukaryote-type system is unprecedented in prokaryotes, and indicates that a prototype of the eukaryotic protein modifier system is present in the Archaea.
Related JoVE Video
Archaeal diversity and distribution along thermal and geochemical gradients in hydrothermal sediments at the Yonaguni Knoll IV hydrothermal field in the Southern Okinawa trough.
Appl. Environ. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 12-18-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
A variety of archaeal lineages have been identified using culture-independent molecular phylogenetic surveys of microbial habitats occurring in deep-sea hydrothermal environments such as chimney structures, sediments, vent emissions, and chemosynthetic macrofauna. With the exception of a few taxa, most of these archaea have not yet been cultivated, and their physiological and metabolic traits remain unclear. In this study, phylogenetic diversity and distribution profiles of the archaeal genes encoding small subunit (SSU) rRNA, methyl coenzyme A (CoA) reductase subunit A, and the ammonia monooxygenase large subunit were characterized in hydrothermally influenced sediments at the Yonaguni Knoll IV hydrothermal field in the Southern Okinawa Trough. Sediment cores were collected at distances of 0.5, 2, or 5 m from a vent emission (90 degrees C). A moderate temperature gradient extends both horizontally and vertically (5 to 69 degrees C), indicating the existence of moderate mixing between the hydrothermal fluid and the ambient sediment pore water. The mixing of reductive hot hydrothermal fluid and cold ambient sediment pore water establishes a wide spectrum of physical and chemical conditions in the microbial habitats that were investigated. Under these different physico-chemical conditions, variability in archaeal phylotype composition was observed. The relationship between the physical and chemical parameters and the archaeal phylotype composition provides important insight into the ecophysiological requirements of uncultivated archaeal lineages in deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments, giving clues for approximating culture conditions to be used in future culturing efforts.
Related JoVE Video
Development of 16S rRNA gene-targeted primers for detection of archaeal anaerobic methanotrophs (ANMEs).
FEMS Microbiol. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 05-09-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Uncultured archaeal anaerobic methanotrophs (ANMEs) are known to operate the anaerobic oxidation of methane process, an important sink for the greenhouse gas methane in natural environments. In this study, we designed 16S rRNA gene-specific primers for each of the phylogenetic groups of ANMEs (ANME-1, Guaymas Basin hydrothermal sediment clones group within the ANME-1, ANME-2a, ANME-2b, ANME-2c and ANME-3) based on previously reported sequences. The newly designed primers were used for the detection of the various groups of ANMEs in the sulphate-limited anaerobic environmental samples, i.e. methanogenic sludges, rice field soils, lotus field sediments and natural gas fields. The ANME 16S rRNA gene sequences were detected only in a natural gas field sample among the environments examined in this study and were of the ANME-1 and -2c groups. In addition, the quantitative real-time PCR analysis using the designed primers showed that abundances of ANME-1 and -2c were estimated to be <0.02% of the total prokaryotic 16S rRNA gene community. The newly designed ANME group-specific primers in this study may be useful to survey the distribution and quantitative determination of ANMEs.
Related JoVE Video
Microbial diversity in deep-sea methane seep sediments presented by SSU rRNA gene tag sequencing.
Microbes Environ.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Microbial community structures in methane seep sediments in the Nankai Trough were analyzed by tag-sequencing analysis for the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene using a newly developed primer set. The dominant members of Archaea were Deep-sea Hydrothermal Vent Euryarchaeotic Group 6 (DHVEG 6), Marine Group I (MGI) and Deep Sea Archaeal Group (DSAG), and those in Bacteria were Alpha-, Gamma-, Delta- and Epsilonproteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes and Acidobacteria. Diversity and richness were examined by 8,709 and 7,690 tag-sequences from sediments at 5 and 25 cm below the seafloor (cmbsf), respectively. The estimated diversity and richness in the methane seep sediment are as high as those in soil and deep-sea hydrothermal environments, although the tag-sequences obtained in this study were not sufficient to show whole microbial diversity in this analysis. We also compared the diversity and richness of each taxon/division between the sediments from the two depths, and found that the diversity and richness of some taxa/divisions varied significantly along with the depth.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.