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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Bioaerosols from a food waste composting plant affect human airway epithelial cell remodeling genes.
Int J Environ Res Public Health
PUBLISHED: 09-11-2013
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The composting procedure in food waste plants generates airborne bioaerosols that have the potential to damage human airway epithelial cells. Persistent inflammation and repair responses induce airway remodeling and damage to the respiratory system. This study elucidated the expression changes of airway remodeling genes in human lung mucoepidermoid NCI-H292 cells exposed to bioaerosols from a composting plant. Different types of microorganisms were detectable in the composting plant, using the agar culture method. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify the level of Aspergillus fumigatus and the profile of remodeling genes. The real-time PCR results indicated that the amount of A. fumigatus in the composting hall was less than 102 conidia. The endotoxins in the field bioaerosols were determined using a limulus amebocyte lysate test. The endotoxin levels depended on the type of particulate matter (PM), with coarse particles (2.5-10 ?m) having higher endotoxin levels than did fine particles (0.5-2.5 ?m). After exposure to the conditioned medium of field bioaerosol samples, NCI-H292 cells showed increased pro-inflammatory interleukin (IL)-6 release and activated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), transforming growth factor (TGF)-?1 and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1 (p21WAF1/CIP1) gene expression, but not of matrix metallopeptidase (MMP)-9. Airborne endotoxin levels were higher inside the composting hall than they were in other areas, and they were associated with PM. This suggested that airborne bioaerosols in the composting plant contained endotoxins and microorganisms besides A. fumigatus that cause the inflammatory cytokine secretion and augment the expression of remodeling genes in NCI-H292 cells. It is thus necessary to monitor potentially hazardous materials from bioaerosols in food composting plants, which could affect the health of workers.
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Use of floating balls for reducing bacterial aerosol emissions from aeration in wastewater treatment processes.
J. Hazard. Mater.
PUBLISHED: 07-23-2009
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The microorganism emissions from aeration in the wastewater treatment process may adversely affect air quality and human health. To control the liquid-to-air transport of microorganisms, commercially available balls were used and their control efficiencies were evaluated by a lab-scale aeration system. Escherichia coli as the test agent were aerosolized by the aeration system and size-fractionated E. coli-containing aerosol samples were collected by using an Andersen six-stage impactor with eosin methylene blue agar for subsequent culturing and enumeration of colonies. Aerosol samples were obtained without any control measure and with balls of four diameters (1.9, 2.9, 3.4 and 4.8 cm) in one, three and five layers covering the bubbling liquid surface. Experimental results showed that the control efficiencies of balls on bacterial aerosols varied from over 50% to nearly 100% under various control settings and substantially increased as the ball size decreased and the number of applied layers increased.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.