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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Oral health and elite sport performance.
Br J Sports Med
PUBLISHED: 09-30-2014
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While the research base is limited, studies have consistently reported poor oral health in elite athletes since the first report from the 1968 Olympic Games. The finding is consistent both across selected samples attending dental clinics at major competitions and more representative sampling of teams and has led to calls from the International Olympic Committee for more accurate data on oral health. Poor oral health is an important issue directly as it can cause pain, negative effects on appearance and psychosocial effects on confidence and quality of life and may have long-term consequences for treatment burden. Self-reported evidence also suggests an impact on training and performance of athletes. There are many potential challenges to the oral health of athletes including nutritional, oral dehydration, exercise-induced immune suppression, lack of awareness, negative health behaviours and lack of prioritisation. However, in theory, oral diseases are preventable by simple interventions with good evidence of efficacy. The consensus statement aims to raise awareness of the issues of oral health in elite sport and recommends strategies for prevention and health promotion in addition to future research strategies.
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Oral hygiene care for critically ill patients to prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev
PUBLISHED: 08-14-2013
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Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is defined as pneumonia developing in persons who have received mechanical ventilation for at least 48 hours. VAP is a potentially serious complication in these patients who are already critically ill. Oral hygiene care (OHC), using either a mouthrinse, gel, toothbrush, or combination, together with aspiration of secretions may reduce the risk of VAP in these patients.
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A practitioners guide to developing critical appraisal skills: reviews of research.
J Am Dent Assoc
PUBLISHED: 05-02-2013
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and overview. This article describes the different types of reviews of research that are available in the literature: systematic reviews and traditional reviews. Systematic reviews have become the reference standard for evidence to inform clinical practice. In this article, the authors set out guidance on appraising the quality and relevance of systematic reviews to help readers make decisions about their clinical practice.
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Ian Needleman: the spirit of positivity at London 2012 was incredible.
Br Dent J
PUBLISHED: 04-13-2013
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Ian Needleman talks to the BDJ about his research study at the London 2012 Olympic Games, the future of periodontology and his top tips for dental students.
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Changes in dental plaque following hospitalisation in a critical care unit: an observational study.
Crit Care
PUBLISHED: 03-21-2013
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Previous research has suggested that deterioration in oral health can occur following hospitalisation. The impact of such deterioration could increase the risk of oral disease, reduce quality of life and increase the potential for healthcare-associated infections (HCAI) such as healthcare-associated pneumonia (HAP). However, the strength of the evidence is limited by, amongst other factors, the few observational studies published that assess oral health longitudinally. In view of the microbiological component of oral diseases and HCAIs, the objective of this study was to investigate the microbiological changes in dental plaque following hospitalisation in a Critical Care Unit (CCU): (1) total number of cultivable bacteria and (2) presence and changes in specific HAP pathogens.
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Clinical review: Association between metabolic syndrome and periodontitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab.
PUBLISHED: 02-05-2013
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Several epidemiological studies have reported an association between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and periodontal diseases (PDs). The aim of this systematic review was to investigate the existence and magnitude of this association.
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The impact of hospitalization on oral health: a systematic review.
J. Clin. Periodontol.
PUBLISHED: 04-07-2011
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Poor oral health of hospitalized patients is associated with an increased risk of hospital-acquired infections and reduced life quality.
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Randomized controlled trial of toothbrushing to reduce ventilator-associated pneumonia pathogens and dental plaque in a critical care unit.
J. Clin. Periodontol.
PUBLISHED: 01-11-2011
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To investigate the effect of a powered toothbrush on colonization of dental plaque by ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP)-associated organisms and dental plaque removal.
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How long do multirooted teeth with furcation involvement survive with treatment?
Evid Based Dent
PUBLISHED: 06-26-2010
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A Medline search and handsearching of the following journals were carried out: International Journal of Periodontics and Restorative Dentistry, Journal of Clinical Periodontology, Journal of Periodontal Research and Journal of Periodontology as well as reference lists of publications selected.
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Treatment of periodontal disease for glycaemic control in people with diabetes.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev
PUBLISHED: 05-14-2010
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Glycaemic control is a key issue in the care of people with diabetes mellitus (DM). Some studies have suggested a bidirectional relationship between glycaemic control and periodontal disease.
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Improving the effectiveness of tobacco use cessation (TUC).
Int Dent J
PUBLISHED: 04-06-2010
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This paper includes an update of a Cochrane systematic review on tobacco use cessation (TUC) in dental settings as well as narrative reviews of possible approaches to TUC and a more detailed discussion of referral for specialist TUC services. On the basis of these reviews we conclude that interventions for tobacco users in the dental setting increase the odds of quitting tobacco. However, the evidence is derived largely from patients using smokeless tobacco. Pharmacotherapy (such as nicotine replacements, bupropion and varenicline) is recommended for TUC in medical settings but has received little assessment in dental applications, although such evidence to date is promising. Whether the dental setting or referral to specialist TUC services is the most effective strategy to help people to quit tobacco use is unclear. An effective specialist service providing best available TUC care alone may not be the answer. Clearly, such services should be both accessible and convenient for tobacco users. Closer integration of specialist services with referrers would also be advantageous in order to guide and support oral health professionals make their referral and to maximise follow-up of referred tobacco users. Future research direction may consider investigating the most effective components of TUC in the dental settings and community-based trials should be a priority. Pharmacotherapy, particularly nicotine replacement therapy, should be more widely examined in dental settings. We also recommend that various models of referral to external and competent in-house TUC specialist services should be examined with both experimental and qualitative approaches. In addition to overall success of TUC, important research questions include facilitators and barriers to TUC in dental settings, preferences for specialist referral, and experiences of tobacco users attempting to quit, with dental professionals or specialist services, respectively.
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Consensus Report: 2nd European Workshop on Tobacco Use Prevention and Cessation for Oral Health Professionals.
Int Dent J
PUBLISHED: 04-06-2010
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Tobacco use has been identified as a major risk factor for oral disorders such as cancer and periodontal disease. Tobacco use cessation (TUC) is associated with the potential for reversal of precancer, enhanced outcomes following periodontal treatment, and better periodontal status compared to patients who continue to smoke. Consequently, helping tobacco users to quit has become a part of both the responsibility of oral health professionals and the general practice of dentistry. TUC should consist of behavioural support, and if accompanied by pharmacotherapy, is more likely to be successful. It is widely accepted that appropriate compensation of TUC counselling would give oral health professionals greater incentives to provide these measures. Therefore, TUC-related compensation should be made accessible to all dental professionals and be in appropriate relation to other therapeutic interventions. International and national associations for oral health professionals are urged to act as advocates to promote population, community and individual initiatives in support of tobacco use prevention and cessation (TUPAC) counselling, including integration in undergraduate and graduate dental curricula. In order to facilitate the adoption of TUPAC strategies by oral health professionals, we propose a level of care model which includes 1) basic care: brief interventions for all patients in the dental practice to identify tobacco users, assess readiness to quit, and request permission to re-address at a subsequent visit, 2) intermediate care: interventions consisting of (brief) motivational interviewing sessions to build on readiness to quit, enlist resources to support change, and to include cessation medications, and 3) advanced care: intensive interventions to develop a detailed quit plan including the use of suitable pharmacotherapy. To ensure that the delivery of effective TUC becomes part of standard care, continuing education courses and updates should be implemented and offered to all oral health professionals on a regular basis.
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The design and analysis of split-mouth studies: what statisticians and clinicians should know.
Stat Med
PUBLISHED: 06-19-2009
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The split-mouth design is a popular design in oral health research. In the most common split-mouth study, each of two treatments are randomly assigned to either the right or left halves of the dentition. The attractiveness of the design is that it removes a lot of inter-individual variability from the estimates of the treatment effect. However, already about 20 years ago the pitfalls of the design have been reported in the oral health literature. Yet, many clinicians are not aware of the potential problems with the split-mouth design. Further, it is our experience that most statisticians are not even aware of the existence of this design. Since most of the critical remarks appeared in the oral health literature, we argue that it is necessary to introduce the split-mouth design to a statistical audience, so that both clinicians and statisticians clearly understand the advantages, limitations, statistical considerations, and implications of its use in clinical trials and advise them on its use in practice.
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A systematic review of definitions of periodontitis and methods that have been used to identify this disease.
J. Clin. Periodontol.
PUBLISHED: 06-11-2009
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To perform a systematic review and critical analysis of the definitions of periodontitis and the methods which have been used to identify and measure this disease.
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Alveolar ridge preservation. A systematic review.
Clin Oral Investig
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The objective of this paper is to examine the effect of alveolar ridge preservation (ARP) compared to unassisted socket healing.
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Systematic review of outcome measurements and reference group(s) to evaluate and compare implant success and failure.
J. Clin. Periodontol.
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There is a lack of consensus on measures to assess implant performance in clinical research.
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A Bayesian network meta-analysis on comparisons of enamel matrix derivatives, guided tissue regeneration and their combination therapies.
J. Clin. Periodontol.
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Guided tissue regeneration (GTR) and enamel matrix derivatives (EMD) are two popular regenerative treatments for periodontal infrabony lesions. Both have been used in conjunction with other regenerative materials. We conducted a Bayesian network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials on treatment effects of GTR, EMD and their combination therapies.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.