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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Kinome-wide functional analysis highlights the role of cytoskeletal remodeling in somatic cell reprogramming.
Cell Stem Cell
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2014
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The creation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from somatic cells by ectopic expression of transcription factors has galvanized the fields of regenerative medicine and developmental biology. Here, we report a kinome-wide RNAi-based analysis to identify kinases that regulate somatic cell reprogramming to iPSCs. We prepared 3,686 small hairpin RNA (shRNA) lentiviruses targeting 734 kinase genes covering the entire mouse kinome and individually examined their effects on iPSC generation. We identified 59 kinases as barriers to iPSC generation and characterized seven of them further. We found that shRNA-mediated knockdown of the serine/threonine kinases TESK1 or LIMK2 promoted mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition, decreased COFILIN phosphorylation, and disrupted Actin filament structures during reprogramming of mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Similarly, knockdown of TESK1 in human fibroblasts also promoted reprogramming to iPSCs. Our study reveals the breadth of kinase networks regulating pluripotency and identifies a role for cytoskeletal remodeling in modulating the somatic cell reprogramming process.
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hnRNP A1 and hnRNP F modulate the alternative splicing of exon 11 of the insulin receptor gene.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 08-15-2011
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Exon 11 of the insulin receptor gene (INSR) is alternatively spliced in a developmentally and tissue-specific manner. Linker scanning mutations in a 5 GA-rich enhancer in intron 10 identified AGGGA sequences that are important for enhancer function. Using RNA-affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we identified hnRNP F and hnRNP A1 binding to these AGGGA sites and also to similar motifs at the 3 end of the intron. The hnRNPs have opposite functional effects with hnRNP F promoting and hnRNP A1 inhibiting exon 11 inclusion, and deletion of the GA-rich elements eliminates both effects. We also observed specific binding of hnRNP A1 to the 5 splice site of intron 11. The SR protein SRSF1 (SF2/ASF) co-purified on the GA-rich enhancer and, interestingly, also competes with hnRNP A1 for binding to the splice site. A point mutation -3U?C decreases hnRNP A1 binding, increases SRSF1 binding and renders the exon constitutive. Lastly, our data point to a functional interaction between hnRNP F and SRSF1 as a mutant that eliminates SRSF1 binding to exon 11, or a SRSF1 knockdown, which prevents the stimulatory effect of hnRNP F over expression.
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Muscleblind-like 1 (Mbnl1) promotes insulin receptor exon 11 inclusion via binding to a downstream evolutionarily conserved intronic enhancer.
J. Biol. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 06-02-2010
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The insulin receptor exists as two isoforms, IR-A and IR-B, which result from alternative splicing of exon 11 in the primary transcript. These two isoforms show a cell-specific distribution, and their relative proportions also vary during development, aging, and in different disease states. We have previously demonstrated that both intron 10 and the alternatively spliced exon 11 contain regulatory sequences that affect insulin receptor splicing both positively and negatively and that these sequences bind the serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins SRp20 and SF2/ASF and the CELF protein CUG-BP1. In this study, we describe a new intronic splicing element within intron 11 that is highly conserved across species. Using minigenes carrying deletion mutations within intron 11, we demonstrated that this sequence functions as an intronic splicing enhancer. We subsequently used RNA affinity chromatography to identify Mbnl1 as a splicing factor that recognizes this enhancer. By ribonucleoprotein immunoprecipitation, we also established that Mbnl1 binds specifically to the INSR (insulin receptor gene) RNA. Overexpression or knockdown of Mbnl1 in hepatoma and embryonic kidney cells altered the levels of exon 11 inclusion. Finally, we showed that deletion of the intronic enhancer eliminates the ability of Mbnl1 to promote exon inclusion. Collectively, these findings demonstrate a role for Mbnl1 in controlling insulin receptor exon 11 inclusion via binding to a downstream intronic enhancer element.
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A role for AMPK in the inhibition of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase by polyunsaturated fatty acids.
Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun.
PUBLISHED: 07-14-2009
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Both polyunsaturated fatty acids and AMPK promote energy partitioning away from energy consuming processes, such as fatty acid synthesis, towards energy generating processes, such as beta-oxidation. In this report, we demonstrate that arachidonic acid activates AMPK in primary rat hepatocytes, and that this effect is p38 MAPK-dependent. Activation of AMPK mimics the inhibition by arachidonic acid of the insulin-mediated induction of G6PD. Similar to intracellular signaling by arachidonic acid, AMPK decreases insulin signal transduction, increasing Ser(307) phosphorylation of IRS-1 and a subsequent decrease in AKT phosphorylation. Overexpression of dominant-negative AMPK abolishes the effect of arachidonic acid on G6PD expression. These data suggest a role for AMPK in the inhibition of G6PD by polyunsaturated fatty acids.
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SRp20 and CUG-BP1 modulate insulin receptor exon 11 alternative splicing.
Mol. Cell. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 02-05-2009
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The insulin receptor (IR) exists as two isoforms, IR-A and IR-B, which result from alternative splicing of exon 11 in the primary transcript. This alternative splicing is cell specific, and the relative proportions of exon 11 isoforms also vary during development, aging, and different disease states. We have previously demonstrated that both intron 10 and exon 11 contain regulatory sequences that affect IR splicing both positively and negatively. In this study, we sought to define the precise sequence elements within exon 11 that control exon recognition and cellular factors that recognize these elements. Using minigenes carrying linker-scanning mutations within exon 11, we detected both exonic splicing enhancer and exonic splicing silencer elements. We identified binding of SRp20 and SF2/ASF to the exonic enhancers and CUG-BP1 to the exonic silencer by RNA affinity chromatography. Overexpression and knockdown studies with hepatoma and embryonic kidney cells demonstrated that SRp20 and SF2/ASF increase exon inclusion but that CUG-BP1 causes exon skipping. We found that CUG-BP1 also binds to an additional intronic splicing silencer, located at the 3 end of intron 10, to promote exon 11 skipping. Thus, we propose that SRp20, SF2/ASF, and CUG-BP1 act antagonistically to regulate IR alternative splicing in vivo and that the relative ratios of SRp20 and SF2/ASF to CUG-BP1 in different cells determine the degree of exon inclusion.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.