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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Extension of traditional infectious disease surveillance with a repeated population survey.
Eur J Public Health
PUBLISHED: 08-03-2014
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Public health surveillance is an important tool for monitoring cases of infectious diseases. Identification of risk factors requires the comparison of exposure between cases and controls. However, standard surveillance systems do not routinely collect information on controls.
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Risk factors for human salmonellosis originating from pigs, cattle, broiler chickens and egg laying hens: a combined case-control and source attribution analysis.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Several case-control studies have investigated risk factors for human salmonellosis while others have used Salmonella subtyping to attribute human infections to different food and animal reservoirs. This study combined case-control and source attribution data into a single analysis to explore risk factors at the point of exposure for human salmonellosis originating from four putative food-producing animal reservoirs (pigs, cattle, broilers and layers/eggs) in the Netherlands. We confirmed that most human cases (? 90%) were attributable to layers/eggs and pigs. Layers/eggs and broilers were the most likely reservoirs of salmonellosis in adults, in urban areas, and in spring/summer, whereas pigs and cattle were the most likely reservoirs of salmonellosis in children, in rural areas, and in autumn/winter. Several reservoir-specific risk factors were identified. Not using a chopping board for raw meat only and consuming raw/undercooked meat were risk factors for infection with salmonellas originating from pigs, cattle and broilers. Consuming raw/undercooked eggs and by-products were risk factors for layer/egg-associated salmonellosis. Using antibiotics was a risk factor for pig- and cattle-associated salmonellosis and using proton-pump inhibitors for salmonellosis attributable to any reservoir. Pig- and cattle-associated infections were also linked to direct contact with animals and environmental exposure (e.g. playing in sandboxes). Eating fish, meat in pastry, and several non-meat foods (fruit, vegetables and pasteurized dairy products) were protective factors. Consuming pork and occupational exposure to animals and/or raw meats were protective against layer/egg-associated salmonellosis. We concluded that individuals acquiring salmonellosis from different reservoirs have different associated risk factors, suggesting that salmonellas may infect humans through various transmission pathways depending on their original reservoirs. The outcome of classical case-control studies can be enhanced by incorporating source attribution data and vice versa.
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Comparison of five influenza surveillance systems during the 2009 pandemic and their association with media attention.
BMC Public Health
PUBLISHED: 09-16-2013
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During the 2009 influenza pandemic period, routine surveillance of influenza-like-illness (ILI) was conducted in The Netherlands by a network of sentinel general practitioners (GPs). In addition during the pandemic period, four other ILI/influenza surveillance systems existed. For pandemic preparedness, we evaluated the performance of the sentinel system and the others to assess which of the four could be useful additions in the future. We also assessed whether performance of the five systems was influenced by media reports during the pandemic period.
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A regional Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium outbreak associated with raw beef products, The Netherlands, 2010.
Foodborne Pathog. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 11-02-2011
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Between April and May 2010, several medical microbiological laboratories in the Netherlands notified a total of 90 cases of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium with the same antibiogram type (resistant for ampicillin, tetracycline, and co-trimoxazol) and the same multiple locus variable number tandem repeats analysis pattern (03-16-09-NA-311) or single locus variants. Date of illness onset ranged from end of March to mid-May with a peak in the second week of April. Almost half of the cases were hospitalized. Cases completed a questionnaire about food items and other risk factors in the 7 days before illness onset. A matched case-control study was performed. Consumption of "ossenworst" (matched odds ratio 48.2 [95% confidence interval (CI): 3.9-595.9]) and filet américain (8.5 [95% CI: 1.0-73.6]) were found to be significant risk factors for illness. Eighty percent of the cases had eaten at least one or both raw meat products. The producer of the ground beef that was used to produce the "ossenworst" was identified, but no microbiological evidence was found. Consumers should be made more aware of the presence of raw meat in ready-to-eat products and of the potential risk in eating these products. Vulnerable persons such as young children, elderly, and persons with poor health should be discouraged from eating these products. Detection of this outbreak was mainly based on the antibiogram pattern that had identified possible cases 10 days before detailed typing results from the reference laboratory became available, thus facilitating early case findings.
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Case-based reported mortality associated with laboratory-confirmed influenza A(H1N1) 2009 virus infection in the Netherlands: the 2009-2010 pandemic season versus the 2010-2011 influenza season.
BMC Public Health
PUBLISHED: 05-23-2011
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In contrast to seasonal influenza epidemics, where the majority of deaths occur amongst elderly, a considerable part of the 2009 pandemic influenza related deaths concerned relatively young people. In the Netherlands, all deaths associated with laboratory-confirmed influenza A(H1N1) 2009 virus infection had to be notified, both during the 2009-2010 pandemic season and the 2010-2011 influenza season. To assess whether and to what extent pandemic mortality patterns were reverting back to seasonal patterns, a retrospective analyses of all notified fatal cases associated with laboratory-confirmed influenza A(H1N1) 2009 virus infection was performed.
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The KIzSS network, a sentinel surveillance system for infectious diseases in day care centers: study protocol.
BMC Infect. Dis.
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Day care-associated infectious diseases are widely recognized as a public health problem but rarely studied. Insights into their dynamics and their association with the day care setting are important for effective decision making in management of infectious disease control. This paper describes the purpose, design and potential of our national multi-center, day care-based sentinel surveillance network for infectious diseases (the KIzSS network). The aim of the KIzSS network is to acquire a long-term insight into the syndromic and microbiological aspects of day care-related infectious diseases and associated disease burden and to model these aspects with day care setting characteristics.
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Utility of the first few100 approach during the 2009 influenza A(H1N1) pandemic in the Netherlands.
Antimicrob Resist Infect Control
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To guide policy and control measures, decent scientific data are needed for a comprehensive assessment of epidemiological, clinical and virological characteristics of the First Few hundred (FF100) cases. We discuss the feasibility of the FF100 approach during the 2009 pandemic and the added value compared with alternative data sources available.
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Risk factors for campylobacteriosis of chicken, ruminant, and environmental origin: a combined case-control and source attribution analysis.
PLoS ONE
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Campylobacteriosis contributes strongly to the disease burden of food-borne pathogens. Case-control studies are limited in attributing human infections to the different reservoirs because they can only trace back to the points of exposure, which may not point to the original reservoirs because of cross-contamination. Human Campylobacter infections can be attributed to specific reservoirs by estimating the extent of subtype sharing between strains from humans and reservoirs using multilocus sequence typing (MLST).
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Disease burden of foodborne pathogens in the Netherlands, 2009.
Int. J. Food Microbiol.
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To inform risk management decisions on control, prevention and surveillance of foodborne disease, the disease burden of foodborne pathogens is estimated using Disability Adjusted Life Years as a summary metric of public health. Fourteen pathogens that can be transmitted by food are included in the study (four infectious bacteria, three toxin-producing bacteria, four viruses and three protozoa). Data represent the burden in the Netherlands in 2009. The incidence of community-acquired non-consulting cases, patients consulting their general practitioner, those admitted to hospital, as well as the incidence of sequelae and fatal cases is estimated using surveillance data, cohort studies and published data. Disease burden includes estimates of duration and disability weights for non-fatal cases and loss of statistical life expectancy for fatal cases. Results at pathogen level are combined with data from an expert survey to assess the fraction of cases attributable to food, and the main food groups contributing to transmission. Among 1.8 million cases of disease (approx. 10,600 per 100,000) and 233 deaths (1.4 per 100,000) by these fourteen pathogens, approximately one-third (680,000 cases; 4100 per 100,000) and 78 deaths (0.5 per 100,000) are attributable to foodborne transmission. The total burden is 13,500 DALY (82 DALY per 100,000). On a population level, Toxoplasma gondii, thermophilic Campylobacter spp., rotaviruses, noroviruses and Salmonella spp. cause the highest disease burden. The burden per case is highest for perinatal listeriosis and congenital toxoplasmosis. Approximately 45% of the total burden is attributed to food. T. gondii and Campylobacter spp. appear to be key targets for additional intervention efforts, with a focus on food and environmental pathways. The ranking of foodborne pathogens based on burden is very different compared to when only incidence is considered. The burden of acute disease is a relatively small part of the total burden. In the Netherlands, the burden of foodborne pathogens is similar to the burden of upper respiratory and urinary tract infections.
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Poultry culling and Campylobacteriosis reduction among humans, the Netherlands.
Emerging Infect. Dis.
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In the Netherlands in 2003, an outbreak of avian influenza in poultry resulted in extensive culling, especially of layer hens. Concurrently, human campylobacteriosis cases decreased, particularly in the culling area. These observations raise the hypothesis that Campylobacter spp. dissemination from poultry farms or slaughterhouses might contribute to human campylobacteriosis.
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Course of pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 virus infection in Dutch patients.
Influenza Other Respir Viruses
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The clinical dynamics of influenza A(H1N1) 2009 infections in 61 laboratory-confirmed Dutch cases were examined. An episode lasted a median of 7·5 days of which 2 days included fever. Respiratory symptoms resolved slowly, while systemic symptoms peaked early in the episode and disappeared quickly. Severity of each symptom was rated highest in the first few days. Furthermore, diarrhoea was negatively associated with viral load, but not with faecal excretion of influenza virus. Cases with comorbidities appeared to have higher viral loads than the cases without, suggesting a less effective immune response. These results complement information obtained through traditional surveillance.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.