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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Investigation of gene-environment interactions between 47 newly identified breast cancer susceptibility loci and environmental risk factors.
Int. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 04-03-2014
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A large genotyping project within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) recently identified 41 associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and overall breast cancer (BC) risk. We investigated whether the effects of these 41 SNPs, as well as six SNPs associated with estrogen receptor (ER) negative BC risk are modified by 13 environmental risk factors for BC. Data from 22 studies participating in BCAC were pooled, comprising up to 26,633 cases and 30,119 controls. Interactions between SNPs and environmental factors were evaluated using an empirical Bayes-type shrinkage estimator. Six SNPs showed interactions with associated p-values (pint ) <1.1 × 10(-3) . None of the observed interactions was significant after accounting for multiple testing. The Bayesian False Discovery Probability was used to rank the findings, which indicated three interactions as being noteworthy at 1% prior probability of interaction. SNP rs6828523 was associated with increased ER-negative BC risk in women ?170 cm (OR = 1.22, p = 0.017), but inversely associated with ER-negative BC risk in women <160 cm (OR = 0.83, p = 0.039, pint = 1.9 × 10(-4) ). The inverse association between rs4808801 and overall BC risk was stronger for women who had had four or more pregnancies (OR = 0.85, p = 2.0 × 10(-4) ), and absent in women who had had just one (OR = 0.96, p = 0.19, pint = 6.1 × 10(-4) ). SNP rs11242675 was inversely associated with overall BC risk in never/former smokers (OR = 0.93, p = 2.8 × 10(-5) ), but no association was observed in current smokers (OR = 1.07, p = 0.14, pint = 3.4 × 10(-4) ). In conclusion, recently identified BC susceptibility loci are not strongly modified by established risk factors and the observed potential interactions require confirmation in independent studies.
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Dietary sources of N-nitroso compounds and bladder cancer risk: findings from the Los Angeles bladder cancer study.
Int. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 05-22-2013
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N-Nitroso compounds (NOCs) have been proposed as possible bladder carcinogens. The main sources of exogenous exposure to NOCs are cigarette smoke and diet, particularly processed (i.e., nitrite-treated) meats. Perhaps more importantly, NOCs can be formed endogenously from dietary precursors such as nitrate, nitrite and amines. Heme has been shown to increase endogenous nitrosation. We examined the role of dietary sources of NOCs and NOC precursors as potential bladder cancer risk factors using data from the Los Angeles Bladder Cancer Study, a population-based case-control study. Dietary and demographic information was collected from 1,660 bladder cancer cases and 1,586 controls via a structured questionnaire. Intake of liver and of salami/pastrami/corned beef, were both statistically significantly associated with risk of bladder cancer in this study, particularly among nonsmokers. Heme intake was also statistically significantly associated with risk of bladder cancer among nonsmokers only. When considering NOC precursors, risk was consistently higher among subjects with concurrent high intake of nitrate and high intake of the different meats (sources of amines and nitrosamines). Results of this study are consistent with a role of dietary sources of NOC precursors from processed meats in bladder cancer risk, suggesting consumption of meats with high amine and heme content such as salami and liver as a risk factor for bladder cancer. In addition, any effect of consuming these meats may be greater when accompanied by high nitrate intake.
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Genetic variations in SMAD7 are associated with colorectal cancer risk in the colon cancer family registry.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-26-2013
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Recent genome-wide studies identified a risk locus for colorectal cancer at 18q21, which maps to the SMAD7 gene. Our objective was to confirm the association between SMAD7 SNPs and colorectal cancer risk in the multi-center Colon Cancer Family Registry.
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Lower risk in parous women suggests that hormonal factors are important in bladder cancer etiology.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 04-14-2011
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Urinary bladder cancer is two to four times more common among men than among women, a difference in risk not fully explained by established risk factors. Our objective was to determine whether hormonal and reproductive factors are involved in female bladder cancer.
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Cigarette smoking and subtypes of bladder cancer.
Int. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 02-11-2011
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There is little information regarding associations between suspected bladder cancer risk factors and tumor subtypes at diagnosis. Some, but not all, studies have found that bladder cancer among smokers is often more invasive than it is among nonsmokers. This population-based case-control study was conducted in Los Angeles, California, involving 1,586 bladder cancer patients and their individually matched controls. Logistic regression was used to conduct separate analyses according to tumor subtypes defined by stage and grade. Cigarette smoking increased risk of both superficial and invasive bladder cancer, but the more advanced the stage, the stronger the effect. The odds ratios associated with regular smokers were 2.2 (95% confidence intervals, 1.8-2.8), 2.7 (2.1-3.6) and 3.7 (2.5-5.5) for low-grade superficial, high-grade superficial and invasive tumors respectively. This pattern was consistently observed regardless of the smoking exposure index under examination. Women had higher risk of invasive bladder cancer than men even they smoked comparable amount of cigarettes as men. There was no gender difference in the association between smoking and risk of low-grade superficial bladder cancer. The heterogeneous effect of cigarette smoking was attenuated among heavy users of NSAIDs. Our results indicate that cigarette smoking was more strongly associated with increased risk of invasive bladder cancer than with low-grade superficial bladder cancer.
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Genetic variations on chromosomes 5p15 and 15q25 and bladder cancer risk: findings from the Los Angeles-Shanghai bladder case-control study.
Carcinogenesis
PUBLISHED: 11-15-2010
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Genome-wide association studies have associated common variations at chromosomes 5p15 and 15q25 with lung cancer risk. The 5p15 locus has also been associated with increased bladder cancer risk in a recent report. The 15q25 locus has been associated with nicotine dependence and self-reported number of cigarettes smoked per day in some studies and it was proposed that its association with lung cancer may be mediated through differences in smoking behavior. Here, we investigated the roles of variations at 5p15 (rs401681, rs402710, rs2736098 and rs2736100) and 15q25 (rs1051730 and rs8034191) in bladder cancer etiology in two case-control studies conducted separately in Los Angeles County, CA, USA (498 cases and 588 controls) and in Shanghai, China (506 cases and 530 controls). We replicated the association between the 5p15 locus and bladder cancer among non-Hispanic whites (NHW) in Los Angeles [for rs2736100, per C allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.23; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.02-1.48; P = 0.029] and among Chinese in Shanghai (OR = 1.22; 95% CI, 1.02-1.47; P = 0.033). Both rs1051730 and rs8034191 at 15q25 were rare among Chinese. Among NHW, a significant association was found between rs8034191 and bladder cancer which persisted after adjustment for cigarette smoking status, number of cigarettes smoked per day and number of years of smoking (per C allele OR = 1.26; 95% CI, 1.04-1.54; P = 0.017). Our results support 5p15 and 15q25 as susceptibility regions for bladder cancer risk.
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Hypertension, diuretics and antihypertensives in relation to bladder cancer.
Carcinogenesis
PUBLISHED: 08-23-2010
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The aim of this study is to investigate the relationships between hypertension, hypertension medication and bladder cancer risk in a population-based case-control study conducted in Los Angeles. Non-Asians between the ages of 25 and 64 years with histologically confirmed bladder cancers diagnosed between 1987 and 1996 were identified through the Los Angeles County Cancer Surveillance Program. A total of 1585 cases and their age-, gender- and race-matched neighborhood controls were included in the analyses. Conditional logistic regression models were used to examine the relationship between history of hypertension, medication use and bladder cancer risk. A history of hypertension was not related to bladder cancer; however, among hypertensive individuals, there was a significant difference in bladder cancer risk related to the use of diuretics or antihypertensive drugs (P for heterogeneity = 0.004). Compared with individuals without hypertension, hypertensive individuals who regularly used diuretics/antihypertensives had a similar risk [odds ratio (OR) 1.06; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.86-1.30], whereas untreated hypertensive subjects had a 35% reduction in risk (OR: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.48-0.88). A greater reduction in bladder cancer risk was observed among current-smokers (OR: 0.43; 95% CI: 0.27-0.71) and carriers of GSTM1-null (homozygous absence) genotypes (OR: 0.43; 95% CI: 0.22-0.85). Similarly, among smokers with GSTM1-null genotype, levels of 4-aminobiphenyl-hemoglobin adducts were significantly lower among untreated hypertensive individuals (45.7 pg/g Hb) compared with individuals without hypertension (79.8 pg/g Hb) (P = 0.009). In conclusion, untreated hypertension was associated with a reduced risk of bladder cancer.
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Hypothesized role of pregnancy hormones on HER2+ breast tumor development.
Breast Cancer Res. Treat.
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Breast cancer incidence rates have declined among older but not younger women; the latter are more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancers carrying a poor prognosis. Epidemiological evidence supports an increase in breast cancer incidence following pregnancy with risk elevated as much as 10 years post-partum. We investigated the association between years since last full-term pregnancy at the time of diagnosis (?10 or >10 years) and breast tumor subtype in a case series of premenopausal Hispanic women (n = 627). Participants were recruited in the United States, Mexico, and Spain. Cases with known estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and HER2 status, with one or more full-term pregnancies ?1 year prior to diagnosis were eligible for this analysis. Cases were classified into three tumor subtypes according to hormone receptor (HR+ = ER+ and/or PR+; HR- = ER- and PR-) expression and HER2 status: HR+/HER2-, HER2+ (regardless of HR), and triple negative breast cancer. Case-only odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for HER2+ tumors in reference to HR+/HER2- tumors. Participants were pooled in a mixed-effects logistic regression model with years since pregnancy as a fixed effect and study site as a random effect. When compared to HR+/HER2- cases, women with HER2+ tumors were more likely be diagnosed in the post-partum period of ?10 years (OR = 1.68; 95 % CI, 1.12-2.52). The effect was present across all source populations and independent of the HR status of the HER2+ tumor. Adjusting for age at diagnosis (?45 or >45 years) did not materially alter our results (OR = 1.78; 95 % CI, 1.08-2.93). These findings support the novel hypothesis that factors associated with the post-partum breast, possibly hormonal, are involved in the development of HER2+ tumors.
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Genome-wide association study identifies a common variant in RAD51B associated with male breast cancer risk.
Nat. Genet.
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We conducted a genome-wide association study of male breast cancer comprising 823 cases and 2,795 controls of European ancestry, with validation in independent sample sets totaling 438 cases and 474 controls. A SNP in RAD51B at 14q24.1 was significantly associated with male breast cancer risk (P = 3.02 × 10(-13); odds ratio (OR) = 1.57). We also refine association at 16q12.1 to a SNP within TOX3 (P = 3.87 × 10(-15); OR = 1.50).
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Population-based case-control study of recreational drug use and testis cancer risk confirms an association between marijuana use and nonseminoma risk.
Cancer
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Testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) incidence increased steadily in recent decades, but causes remain elusive. Germ cell function may be influenced by cannabinoids, and 2 prior epidemiologic studies reported that the use of marijuana may be associated with nonseminomatous TGCT. Here, the authors evaluate the relation between TGCTs and exposure to marijuana and other recreational drugs using a population-based case-control study.
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Breast feeding, parity and breast cancer subtypes in a Spanish cohort.
PLoS ONE
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Differences in the incidence and outcome of breast cancer among Hispanic women compared with white women are well documented and are likely explained by ethnic differences in genetic composition, lifestyle, or environmental exposures. METHODOLGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A population-based study was conducted in Galicia, Spain. A total of 510 women diagnosed with operable invasive breast cancer between 1997 and 2010 participated in the study. Data on demographics, breast cancer risk factors, and clinico-pathological characteristics were collected. The different breast cancer tumor subtypes were compared on their clinico-pathological characteristics and risk factor profiles, particularly reproductive variables and breastfeeding. Among the 501 breast cancer patients (with known ER and PR receptors), 85% were ER+/PR+ and 15% were ER-&PR-. Among the 405 breast cancer with known ER, PR and HER2 status, 71% were ER+/PR+/HER2- (luminal A), 14% were ER+/PR+/HER2+ (luminal B), 10% were ER-/PR-/HER2- (triple negative breast cancer, TNBC), and 5% were ER-/PR-/HER2+ (non-luminal). A lifetime breastfeeding period equal to or longer than 7 months was less frequent in case patients with TNBC (OR?=?0.25, 95% CI?=?0.08-0.68) compared to luminal A breast cancers. Both a low (2 or fewer pregnancies) and a high (3-4 pregnancies) number of pregnancies combined with a long breastfeeding period were associated with reduced odds of TNBC compared with luminal A breast cancer, although the association seemed to be slightly more pronounced among women with a low number of pregnancies (OR?=?0.09, 95% CI?=?0.005-0.54).
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Family history and breast cancer hormone receptor status in a Spanish cohort.
PLoS ONE
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Breast cancer is a heterogenous disease that impacts racial/ethnic groups differently. Differences in genetic composition, lifestyles, reproductive factors, or environmental exposures may contribute to the differential presentation of breast cancer among Hispanic women.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.