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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
A feedback mechanism to control apoptosis occurs in the digestive gland of the oyster crassostrea gigas exposed to the paralytic shellfish toxins producer Alexandrium catenella.
Mar Drugs
PUBLISHED: 06-20-2014
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To better understand the effect of Paralytic Shellfish Toxins (PSTs) accumulation in the digestive gland of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, we experimentally exposed individual oysters for 48 h to a PSTs producer, the dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella. In comparison to the effect of the non-toxic Alexandrium tamarense, on the eight apoptotic related genes tested, Bax and BI.1 were significantly upregulated in oysters exposed 48 h to A. catenella. Among the five detoxification related genes tested, the expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP1A) was shown to be correlated with toxin concentration in the digestive gland of oysters exposed to the toxic dinoflagellate. Beside this, we observed a significant increase in ROS production, a decrease in caspase-3/7 activity and normal percentage of apoptotic cells in this tissue. Taken together, these results suggest a feedback mechanism, which may occur in the digestive gland where BI.1 could play a key role in preventing the induction of apoptosis by PSTs. Moreover, the expression of CYP1A, Bax and BI.1 were found to be significantly correlated to the occurrence of natural toxic events, suggesting that the expression of these genes together could be used as biomarker to assess the biological responses of oysters to stress caused by PSTs.
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Low or high doses of cefquinome targeting low or high bacterial inocula cure Klebsiella pneumoniae lung infections but differentially impact the levels of antibiotic resistance in fecal flora.
Antimicrob. Agents Chemother.
PUBLISHED: 01-06-2014
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The combination of efficacious treatment against bacterial infections and mitigation of antibiotic resistance amplification in gut microbiota is a major challenge for antimicrobial therapy in food-producing animals. In rats, we evaluated the impact of cefquinome, a fourth-generation cephalosporin, on both Klebsiella pneumoniae lung infection and intestinal flora harboring CTX-M-producing Enterobacteriaceae. Germfree rats received a fecal flora specimen from specific-pathogen-free pigs, to which a CTX-M-producing Escherichia coli strain had been added. K. pneumoniae cells were inoculated in the lungs of these gnotobiotic rats by using either a low (10(5) CFU) or a high (10(9) CFU) inoculum. Without treatment, all animals infected with the low or high K. pneumoniae inoculum developed pneumonia and died before 120 h postchallenge. In the treated groups, the low-inoculum rats received a 4-day treatment of 5 mg/kg of body weight cefquinome beginning at 24 h postchallenge (prepatent phase of the disease), and the high-inoculum rats received a 4-day treatment of 50 mg/kg cefquinome beginning when the animals expressed clinical signs of infection (patent phase of the disease). The dose of 50 mg/kg targeting the high K. pneumoniae inoculum cured all the treated rats and resulted in a massive amplification of CTX-M-producing Enterobacteriaceae. A dose of 5 mg/kg targeting the low K. pneumoniae inoculum cured all the rats and averted an outbreak of clinical disease, all without any amplification of CTX-M-producing Enterobacteriaceae. These findings might have implications for the development of new antimicrobial treatment strategies that ensure a cure for bacterial infections while avoiding the amplification of resistance genes of human concern in the gut microbiota of food-producing animals.
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The Inaccuracy of National Character Stereotypes.
J Res Pers
PUBLISHED: 11-05-2013
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Consensual stereotypes of some groups are relatively accurate, whereas others are not. Previous work suggesting that national character stereotypes are inaccurate has been criticized on several grounds. In this article we (a) provide arguments for the validity of assessed national mean trait levels as criteria for evaluating stereotype accuracy; and (b) report new data on national character in 26 cultures from descriptions (N=3,323) of the typical male or female adolescent, adult, or old person in each. The average ratings were internally consistent and converged with independent stereotypes of the typical culture member, but were weakly related to objective assessments of personality. We argue that this conclusion is consistent with the broader literature on the inaccuracy of national character stereotypes.
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Exposure to the Neurotoxic Dinoflagellate, Alexandrium catenella, Induces Apoptosis of the Hemocytes of the Oyster, Crassostrea gigas.
Mar Drugs
PUBLISHED: 09-27-2013
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This study assessed the apoptotic process occurring in the hemocytes of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, exposed to Alexandrium catenella, a paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) producer. Oysters were experimentally exposed during 48 h to the toxic algae. PSTs accumulation, the expression of 12 key apoptotic-related genes, as well as the variation of the number of hemocytes in apoptosis was measured at time intervals during the experiment. Results show a significant increase of the number of hemocytes in apoptosis after 29 h of exposure. Two pro-apoptotic genes (Bax and Bax-like) implicated in the mitochondrial pathway were significantly upregulated at 21 h followed by the overexpression of two caspase executor genes (caspase-3 and caspase-7) at 29 h, suggesting that the intrinsic pathway was activated. No modulation of the expression of genes implicated in the cell signaling Fas-Associated protein with Death Domain (FADD) and initiation-phase (caspase-2) was observed, suggesting that only the extrinsic pathway was not activated. Moreover, the clear time-dependent upregulation of five (Bcl2, BI-1, IAP1, IAP7B and Hsp70) inhibitors of apoptosis-related genes associated with the return to the initial number of hemocytes in apoptosis at 48 h of exposure suggests the involvement of strong regulatory mechanisms of apoptosis occurring in the hemocytes of the Pacific oyster.
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The structure of the Montgomery-Åsberg depression rating scale over the course of treatment for depression.
Int J Methods Psychiatr Res
PUBLISHED: 09-17-2013
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The Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) is a widely used clinician-rated measure of depressive severity. Empirical support for the factor structure of the MADRS is mixed; further, the comparison of MADRS scores within and between patients requires the demonstration of consistent instrument properties. The objective of the current investigation was to evaluate MADRS factor structure as well as MADRS factorial invariance across time and gender. The MADRS was administered to 821 depressed outpatients participating in a large-scale effectiveness study of combined pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy for depression. Treatment outcome did not differ across treatment groups. Factor structure and invariance was evaluated via confirmatory factor analysis. A four-factor model consisting of Sadness, Negative Thoughts, Detachment and Neurovegetative symptoms demonstrated a good fit to the data. This four-factor structure was invariant across time and gender. A hierarchical model, in which these four factors served as indicators of a general depression factor, was also supported. A limitation of the current study is the lack of comprehensive characterization of patient clinical features; results need to be replicated in more severely depressed or treatment refractory patients. Overall, evidence supported the use of the MADRS total score as well as subscales focused on affective, cognitive, social and somatic aspects of depression in male and female outpatients. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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Visualizing Compaction of Polysomes in Bacteria.
J. Mol. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 06-20-2013
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During protein synthesis, many translating ribosomes are bound together with an mRNA molecule to form polysomes (or polyribosomes). While the spatial organization of bacterial polysomes has been well studied in vitro, little is known about how they cluster when cellular conditions are highly constrained. To better understand this, we used electron tomography, template matching, and three-dimensional modeling to analyze the supramolecular network of ribosomes after induction of translational pauses. In Escherichia coli, we overexpressed an mRNA carrying a polyproline motif known to induce pausing during translation. When working with a strain lacking transfer-messenger RNA, the principle actor in the "trans-translation" rescuing system, the cells survived the hijacking of the translation machinery but this resulted in a sharp modification of the ribosomal network. The results of our experiments demonstrate that single ribosomes are replaced with large amounts of compacted polysomes. These polysomes are highly organized, principally forming hairpins and dimers of hairpins that stack together. We propose that these spatial arrangements help maintain translation efficiency when the rescue systems are absent or overwhelmed.
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An olive oil-derived antioxidant mixture ameliorates the age-related decline of skeletal muscle function.
Age (Dordr)
PUBLISHED: 05-14-2013
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Age-related skeletal muscle decline is characterized by the modification of sarcolemma ion channels important to sustain fiber excitability and to prevent metabolic dysfunction. Also, calcium homeostasis and contractile function are impaired. In the aim to understand whether these modifications are related to oxidative damage and can be reverted by antioxidant treatment, we examined the effects of in vivo treatment with an waste water polyphenolic mixture (LACHI MIX HT) supplied by LACHIFARMA S.r.l. Italy containing hydroxytirosol (HT), gallic acid, and homovanillic acid on the skeletal muscles of 27-month-old rats. After 6-week treatment, we found an improvement of chloride ClC-1 channel conductance, pivotal for membrane electrical stability, and of ATP-dependent potassium channel activity, important in coupling excitability with fiber metabolism. Both of them were analyzed using electrophysiological techniques. The treatment also restored the resting cytosolic calcium concentration, the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release, and the mechanical threshold for contraction, an index of excitation-contraction coupling mechanism. Muscle weight and blood creatine kinase levels were preserved in LACHI MIX HT-treated aged rats. The antioxidant activity of LACHI MIX HT was confirmed by the reduction of malondialdehyde levels in the brain of the LACHI MIX HT-treated aged rats. In comparison, the administration of purified HT was less effective on all the parameters studied. Although muscle function was not completely recovered, the present study provides evidence of the beneficial effects of LACHI MIX HT, a natural compound, to ameliorate skeletal muscle functional decline due to aging-associated oxidative stress.
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Evaluation of an oral subchronic exposure of deoxynivalenol on the composition of human gut microbiota in a model of human microbiota-associated rats.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Deoxynivalenol (DON), a mycotoxin produced by Fusarium species, is one of the most prevalent mycotoxins present in cereal crops worldwide. Due to its toxic properties, high stability and prevalence, the presence of DON in the food chain represents a health risk for both humans and animals. The gastrointestinal microbiota represents potentially the first target for these food contaminants. Thus, the effects of mycotoxins on the human gut microbiota is clearly an issue that needs to be addressed in further detail. Using a human microbiota-associated rat model, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of a chronic exposure of DON on the composition of human gut microbiota.
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A supramolecular assembly formed by influenza A virus genomic RNA segments.
Nucleic Acids Res.
PUBLISHED: 11-10-2011
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The influenza A virus genome consists of eight viral RNAs (vRNAs) that form viral ribonucleoproteins (vRNPs). Even though evidence supporting segment-specific packaging of vRNAs is accumulating, the mechanism ensuring selective packaging of one copy of each vRNA into the viral particles remains largely unknown. We used electron tomography to show that the eight vRNPs emerge from a common transition zone located underneath the matrix layer at the budding tip of the virions, where they appear to be interconnected and often form a star-like structure. This zone appears as a platform in 3D surface rendering and is thick enough to contain all known packaging signals. In vitro, all vRNA segments are involved in a single network of intermolecular interactions. The regions involved in the strongest interactions were identified and correspond to known packaging signals. A limited set of nucleotides in the 5 region of vRNA 7 was shown to interact with vRNA 6 and to be crucial for packaging of the former vRNA. Collectively, our findings support a model in which the eight genomic RNA segments are selected and packaged as an organized supramolecular complex held together by direct base pairing of the packaging signals.
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Structural nucleotide analogs are potent activators/inhibitors of pancreatic ? cell KATP channels: an emerging mechanism supporting their use as antidiabetic drugs.
J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 10-25-2011
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The 2H-1,4-benzoxazine derivatives are novel drugs structurally similar to nucleotides; however, their actions on the pancreatic ? cell ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channel and on glucose disposal are unknown. Therefore, the effects of the linear/branched alkyl substituents and the aliphatic/aromatic rings at position 2 of the 2H-1,4-benzoxazine nucleus on the activity of these molecules against the pancreatic ? cell KATP channel and the Kir6.2?C36 subunit were investigated using a patch-clamp technique. The effects of these compounds on glucose disposal that followed glucose loading by intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test and on fasting glycemia were investigated in normal mice. The 2-n-hexyl analog blocked the KATP (IC?? = 10.1 × 10?? M) and Kir6.2?C36 (IC?? = 9.6 × 10?? M) channels, which induced depolarization. In contrast, the 2-phenyl analog was a potent opener (drug concentration needed to enhance the current by 50% = 0.04 × 10?? M), which induced hyperpolarization. The ranked order of the potency/efficacy of the analog openers was 2-phenyl > 2-benzyl > 2-cyclohexylmethyl. The 2-phenylethyl and 2-isopropyl analogs were not effective as blockers/openers. The 2-n-hexyl (2-10 mg/kg) and 2-phenyl analogs (2-30 mg/kg) reduced and enhanced the glucose areas under the curves, respectively, after glucose loading in mice. These compounds did not affect the fasting glycemia as is observed with glibenclamide. The linear alkyl chain and the aromatic ring at position 2 of the 1,4-benzoxazine nucleus are the determinants, which confer the KATP channel blocking action with glucose-lowering effects and the opening action with increased glucose levels, respectively. The opening/blocking actions of these compounds mimic those that were observed with ATP and ADP. The results support the use of these compounds as novel antidiabetic drugs.
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Does personality disorder co-morbidity impact treatment outcome for patients with major depression? A multi-level analysis.
J. Pers. Disord.
PUBLISHED: 02-12-2011
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In literature, there exists disagreement regarding the impact of comorbid personality disorder(s) (PD[s]) on treatment outcome for patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). The aim of this paper was to investigate whether statistical heterogeneity and inter-dependency are potential moderators of the effect of co-morbid PDs on outcome for patients with MDD. Clinician-rated MADRS scores and DSM-IV Axis II personality disorder diagnoses were obtained from 562 outpatients with MDD who received 6 months of combined psycho- and pharmacotherapy. Single-level regression showed significantly worse treatment outcome among patients with co-morbid PD, as compared to patients with no PD. After controlling for statistical heterogeneity and interdependency, treatment outcome was no longer significantly worse for patients with co-morbid PD. In conclusion, heteroscedasticity and inter-dependency should be considered as potentially compelling explanations for inconsistencies in findings on treatment outcome for depressed patients with co-morbid PDs.
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Importance of viral genomic composition in modulating glycoprotein content on the surface of influenza virus particles.
Virology
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2011
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Despite progress in our knowledge of the internal organisation of influenza virus particles, little is known about the determinants of their morphology and, more particularly, of the actual abundance of structural proteins at the virion level. To address these issues, we used cryo-EM to focus on viral (and host) factors that might account for observed differences in virion morphology and characteristics such as size, shape and glycoprotein (GP) spike density. Twelve recombinant viruses were characterised in terms of their morphology, neuraminidase activity and virus growth. The genomic composition was shown to be important in determining the GP spike density. In particular, polymerase gene segments and especially PB1/PB2 were shown to have a prominent influence in addition to that for HA in determining GP spike density, a feature consistent with a functional link between these virus components important for virus fitness.
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Personality pathology comorbidity in adult females with eating disorders.
J Health Psychol
PUBLISHED: 10-07-2010
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Personality pathology is examined in 100 female in-patients diagnosed with eating disorders. The Eating Disorder Inventory-II and the NEO-PI-R were self-administered and personality pathology was assessed using a structured interview. Clinicians additionally evaluated patients global functioning. The results indicated sizeable personality disorder comorbidity, and two dimensions of personality pathology, for example, an internalizing and an externalizing factor, could be identified. Patients global functioning was primarily associated with dimensions of personality pathology, but not with eating disorder symptoms. Assessment and therapeutic interventions should focus on this co-occurring pathology in order to improve patients functioning.
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tmRNA-SmpB: a journey to the centre of the bacterial ribosome.
EMBO J.
PUBLISHED: 07-12-2010
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Ribosomes mediate protein synthesis by decoding the information carried by messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and catalysing peptide bond formation between amino acids. When bacterial ribosomes stall on incomplete messages, the trans-translation quality control mechanism is activated by the transfer-messenger RNA bound to small protein B (tmRNA-SmpB ribonucleoprotein complex). Trans-translation liberates the stalled ribosomes and triggers degradation of the incomplete proteins. Here, we present the cryo-electron microscopy structures of tmRNA-SmpB accommodated or translocated into stalled ribosomes. Two atomic models for each state are proposed. This study reveals how tmRNA-SmpB crosses the ribosome and how, as the problematic mRNA is ejected, the tmRNA resume codon is placed onto the ribosomal decoding site by new contacts between SmpB and the nucleotides upstream of the tag-encoding sequence. This provides a structural basis for the transit of the large tmRNA-SmpB complex through the ribosome and for the means by which the tmRNA internal frame is set for translation to resume.
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Dendrigraft poly-L-lysine: a non-immunogenic synthetic carrier for antibody production.
Biomacromolecules
PUBLISHED: 04-24-2010
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An easily synthesized DendriGraft poly-lysine DGL-G3 (third generation) was shown to act as an efficient carrier for raising antibodies directed against small molecules. The immunological properties of three different forms of DGL-G3 were investigated: the native form (molecular weight 22 kDa bearing a mean number of 123 surface amino groups as TFA salts), a form modified at the C-terminus by fluorescein (fluorescein-DGL-G3), and last a surface-modified form bearing histamine (DGL-G3-Histamine). Our studies demonstrate the native DGL-G3 to be inefficient in eliciting antibody production in rabbits. Immunizations of rabbits using the core-modified fluorescein-DGL-G3 or the surface-modified DGL-G3-histamine conjugate failed in eliciting antibody production. Conversely, following a primary immunization using a BSA-histamine conjugate, a second immunization with DGL-G3-histamine conjugate improved the production of specific hapten-directed antibodies, which demonstrates the utility of DGL-G3 as a carrier for the production of highly specific antibody against haptens.
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Accommodation of tmRNA-SmpB into stalled ribosomes: a cryo-EM study.
RNA
PUBLISHED: 12-28-2009
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In eubacteria, translation of defective messenger RNAs (mRNAs) produces truncated polypeptides that stall on the ribosome. A quality control mechanism referred to as trans-translation is performed by transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA), a specialized RNA acting as both a tRNA and an mRNA, associated with small protein B (SmpB). So far, a clear view of the structural movements of both the protein and RNA necessary to perform accommodation is still lacking. By using a construct containing the tRNA-like domain as well as the extended helix H2 of tmRNA, we present a cryo-electron microscopy study of the process of accommodation. The structure suggests how tmRNA and SmpB move into the ribosome decoding site after the release of EF-Tu.GDP. While two SmpB molecules are bound per ribosome in a preaccommodated state, our results show that during accommodation the SmpB protein interacting with the small subunit decoding site stays in place while the one interacting with the large subunit moves away. Relative to canonical translation, an additional movement is observed due to the rotation of H2. This suggests that the larger movement required to resume translation on a tmRNA internal open reading frame starts during accommodation.
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Perceptions of aging across 26 cultures and their culture-level associates.
Psychol Aging
PUBLISHED: 12-23-2009
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College students (N=3,435) in 26 cultures reported their perceptions of age-related changes in physical, cognitive, and socioemotional areas of functioning and rated societal views of aging within their culture. There was widespread cross-cultural consensus regarding the expected direction of aging trajectories with (a) perceived declines in societal views of aging, physical attractiveness, the ability to perform everyday tasks, and new learning; (b) perceived increases in wisdom, knowledge, and received respect; and (c) perceived stability in family authority and life satisfaction. Cross-cultural variations in aging perceptions were associated with culture-level indicators of population aging, education levels, values, and national character stereotypes. These associations were stronger for societal views on aging and perceptions of socioemotional changes than for perceptions of physical and cognitive changes. A consideration of culture-level variables also suggested that previously reported differences in aging perceptions between Asian and Western countries may be related to differences in population structure.
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Parainfluenza virus type 5 (PIV-5) morphology revealed by cryo-electron microscopy.
Virus Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-29-2009
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The knowledge of parainfluenza type 5 (PIV-5) virion morphology is essentially based on the observation of negatively stained preparations in conventional transmission electron microscopy (CTEM). In this study, the ultrastructure of frozen-hydrated intact PIV-5 was examined by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). Cryo-EM revealed a majority of spherical virions (70%), with a lower pleiomorphy than originally observed in CTEM. Phospholipid bilayer thickness, spike length and glycoprotein spikes density were measured. About 2000 glycoprotein spikes were present in an average-sized spherical virion. Altogether, these data depict a more precise view of PIV-5 morphology.
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Multiple pathological events in exercised dystrophic mdx mice are targeted by pentoxifylline: outcome of a large array of in vivo and ex vivo tests.
J. Appl. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2009
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The phosphodiesterases inhibitor pentoxifylline gained attention for Duchenne muscular dystrophy therapy for its claimed anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antifibrotic action. A recent finding also showed that pentoxifylline counteracts the abnormal overactivity of a voltage-independent calcium channel in myofibers of dystrophic mdx mice. The possible link between workload, altered calcium homeostasis, and oxidative stress pushed toward a more detailed investigation. Thus a 4- to 8-wk treatment with pentoxifylline (50 mg x kg(-1) x day(-1) ip) was performed in mdx mice, undergoing or not a chronic exercise on treadmill. In vivo, the treatment partially increased forelimb strength and enhanced resistance to treadmill running in exercised animals. Ex vivo, pentoxifylline restored the mechanical threshold, an electrophysiological index of calcium homeostasis, and reduced resting cytosolic calcium in extensor digitorum longus muscle fibers. Mn quenching and patch-clamp technique confirmed that this effect was paralleled by a drug-induced reduction of membrane permeability to calcium. The treatment also significantly enhanced isometric tetanic tension in mdx diaphragm. The plasma levels of creatine kinase and reactive oxygen species were both significantly reduced in treated-exercised animals. Dihydroethidium staining, used as an indicator of reactive oxygen species production, showed that pentoxifylline significantly reduced the exercise-induced increase in fluorescence in the mdx tibialis anterior muscle. A significant decrease in connective tissue area and profibrotic cytokine transforming growth factor-beta(1) was solely found in tibialis anterior muscle. In both diaphragm and gastrocnemius muscle, a significant increase in neural cell adhesion molecule-positive area was instead observed. This data supports the interest toward pentoxifylline and allows insight in the level of cross talk between pathogenetic events in workloaded dystrophic muscle.
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Paralytic toxins accumulation and tissue expression of ?-amylase and lipase genes in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas fed with the neurotoxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella.
Mar Drugs
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The pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas was experimentally exposed to the neurotoxic Alexandrium catenella and a non-producer of PSTs, Alexandrium tamarense (control algae), at concentrations corresponding to those observed during the blooming period. At fixed time intervals, from 0 to 48 h, we determined the clearance rate, the total filtered cells, the composition of the fecal ribbons, the profile of the PSP toxins and the variation of the expression of two ?-amylase and triacylglecerol lipase precursor (TLP) genes through semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The results showed a significant decrease of the clearance rate of C. gigas fed with both Alexandrium species. However, from 29 to 48 h, the clearance rate and cell filtration activity increased only in oysters fed with A. tamarense. The toxin concentrations in the digestive gland rose above the sanitary threshold in less than 48 h of exposure and GTX6, a compound absent in A. catenella cells, accumulated. The ?-amylase B gene expression level increased significantly in the time interval from 6 to 48 h in the digestive gland of oysters fed with A. tamarense, whereas the TLP gene transcript was significantly up-regulated in the digestive gland of oysters fed with the neurotoxic A. catenella. All together, these results suggest that the digestion capacity could be affected by PSP toxins.
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Optimize radiochemotherapy in pancreatic cancer: PARP inhibitors a new therapeutic opportunity.
Mol Oncol
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Cancer cells may use PARP enzymes and Homologous Recombination to repair single and double strand breaks caused by genotoxic insults. In this study, the PARP-1 inhibitor Rucaparib was utilized to increase the sensitivity to chemoradiotherapy treatment in BRCA-2-deficient and -proficient pancreatic cancer cells. We used the pancreatic cancer cell lines, Capan-1 with mutated BRCA-2 and Panc-1, AsPC-1 and MiaPaCa-2 with BRCA-1/2 wild type. Cells were treated with Rucaparib and/or radiotherapy (4-10 Gy) plus Gemcitabine then the capability to proliferate was evaluated by colony formation, cell counting and MTT assays. Flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry and western blotting were utilized to assess cell response to Rucaparib plus irradiation. The antitumour effectiveness of combining the PARP-1 inhibitor before, together and after radiotherapy evidenced the first as the optimal schedule in blocking cell growth. Pre-exposure to Rucaparib increased the cytotoxicity of Gemcitabine plus radiotherapy by heavily inducing the accumulation of cells in G2/M phase, impairing mitosis and finally inducing apoptosis and authophagy. The upregulation of p-Akt and downregulation of p53 were evidenced in MiaPaCa-2 which displayed replication stress features. For the first time, the rationale of using a PARP inhibitor as chemoradiosensitizer in pancreatic cancer models has been hypothesized and demonstrated.
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Stereotypes of age differences in personality traits: universal and accurate?
J Pers Soc Psychol
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Age trajectories for personality traits are known to be similar across cultures. To address whether stereotypes of age groups reflect these age-related changes in personality, we asked participants in 26 countries (N = 3,323) to rate typical adolescents, adults, and old persons in their own country. Raters across nations tended to share similar beliefs about different age groups; adolescents were seen as impulsive, rebellious, undisciplined, preferring excitement and novelty, whereas old people were consistently considered lower on impulsivity, activity, antagonism, and Openness. These consensual age group stereotypes correlated strongly with published age differences on the five major dimensions of personality and most of 30 specific traits, using as criteria of accuracy both self-reports and observer ratings, different survey methodologies, and data from up to 50 nations. However, personal stereotypes were considerably less accurate, and consensual stereotypes tended to exaggerate differences across age groups.
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Interaction network linking the human H3N2 influenza A virus genomic RNA segments.
Vaccine
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The genome of influenza A viruses is comprised of eight negative-sense viral RNAs (vRNAs) that form viral ribonucleoproteins (vRNPs). In order to be infectious, an influenza A viral particle must encapsidate at least one copy of each of the vRNAs. Thus, even though genome segmentation is evolutionary advantageous, it undeniably complicates viral assembly, which is believed to occur through a selective mechanism that still remains to be understood. Using electron tomography 3D-reconstructions, we show that the eight vRNPs of an influenza A Moscow/10/99 (H3N2) virus are interconnected within a star-like structure as they emerge from a unique "transition zone" at the budding tip of the virions. Notably, this "transition zone" is thick enough to accommodate all described packaging signals. We also report that, in vitro, each vRNA segment is involved in a direct contact with at least one other vRNA partner, in a single network of intermolecular interactions. We show that in several cases, the regions involved in vRNA/vRNA interactions overlap with previously identified packaging signals. Our results thus provide support for the involvement of RNA/RNA interactions in the selection and specific packaging of influenza A genomic RNAs, which appear embedded into an organised supramolecular complex likely held together by direct base-pairings between packaging signals.
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Multiple representations and mechanisms for visuomotor adaptation in young children.
Hum Mov Sci
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In this study, we utilized transformed spatial mappings to perturb visuomotor integration in 5-yr-old children and adults. The participants were asked to perform pointing movements under five different conditions of visuomotor rotation (from 0° to 180°), which were designed to reveal explicit vs. implicit representations as well as the mechanisms underlying the visual-motor mapping. Several tests allowed us to separately evaluate sensorimotor (i.e., the dynamic dimension of movement) and cognitive (i.e., the explicit representations of target position and the strategies used by the participants) representations of visuo-proprioceptive distortion. Our results indicate that children do not establish representations in the same manner as adults and that children exhibit multiple visuomotor representations. Sensorimotor representations were relatively precise, presumably due to the recovery of proprioceptive information and efferent copy. Furthermore, a bidirectional mechanism was used to re-map visual and motor spaces. In contrast, cognitive representations were supplied with visual information and followed a unidirectional visual-motor mapping. Therefore, it appears that sensorimotor mechanisms develop before the use of explicit strategies during development, and young children showed impaired visuomotor adaptation when confronted with large distortions.
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Identification of selective inhibitors of the potassium channel Kv1.1-1.2((3)) by high-throughput virtual screening and automated patch clamp.
ChemMedChem
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Two voltage-dependent potassium channels, Kv1.1 (KCNA1) and Kv1.2 (KCNA2), are found to co-localize at the juxtaparanodal region of axons throughout the nervous system and are known to co-assemble in heteromultimeric channels, most likely in the form of the concatemer Kv1.1-1.2((3)) . Loss of the myelin sheath, as is observed in multiple sclerosis, uncovers the juxtaparanodal region of nodes of Ranvier in myelinated axons leading to potassium conductance, resulting in loss of nerve conduction. The selective blocking of these Kv channels is therefore a promising approach to restore nerve conduction and function. In the present study, we searched for novel inhibitors of Kv1.1-1.2((3)) by combining a virtual screening protocol and electrophysiological measurements on a concatemer Kv1.1-1.2((3)) stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary K1 (CHO-K1) cells. The combined use of four popular virtual screening approaches (eHiTS, FlexX, Glide, and Autodock-Vina) led to the identification of several compounds as potential inhibitors of the Kv1.1-1.2((3)) channel. From 89 electrophysiologically evaluated compounds, 14 novel compounds were found to inhibit the current carried by Kv1.1-1.2((3)) channels by more than 80 % at 10 ?M. Accordingly, the IC(50) values calculated from concentration-response curve titrations ranged from 0.6 to 6 ?M. Two of these compounds exhibited at least 30-fold higher potency in inhibition of Kv1.1-1.2((3)) than they showed in inhibition of a set of cardiac ion channels (hERG, Nav1.5, and Cav1.2), resulting in a profile of selectivity and cardiac safety. The results presented herein provide a promising basis for the development of novel selective ion channel inhibitors, with a dramatically lower demand in terms of experimental time, effort, and cost than a sole high-throughput screening approach of large compound libraries.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.