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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Virologic and immunologic evidence of multifocal genital herpes simplex virus 2 infection.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 02-19-2014
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Genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) reactivation is thought to be anatomically and temporally localized, coincident with limited ganglionic infection. Short, subclinical shedding episodes are the most common form of HSV-2 reactivation, with host clearance mechanisms leading to rapid containment. The anatomic distribution of shedding episodes has not been characterized. To precisely define patterns of anatomic reactivation, we divided the genital tract into a 22-region grid and obtained daily swabs for 20 days from each region in 28 immunocompetent, HSV-2-seropositive persons. HSV was detected via PCR, and sites of asymptomatic HSV shedding were subjected to a biopsy procedure within 24 h. CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were quantified by immunofluorescence, and HSV-specific CD4(+) T cells were identified by intracellular cytokine cytometry. HSV was detected in 868 (7%) of 11,603 genital swabs at a median of 12 sites per person (range, 0 to 22). Bilateral HSV detection occurred on 83 (67%) days with shedding, and the median quantity of virus detected/day was associated with the number of sites positive (P < 0.001). In biopsy specimens of asymptomatic shedding sites, we found increased numbers of CD8(+) T cells compared to control tissue (27 versus 13 cells/mm(2), P = 0.03) and identified HSV-specific CD4(+) T cells. HSV reactivations emanate from widely separated anatomic regions of the genital tract and are associated with a localized cellular infiltrate that was demonstrated to be HSV specific in 3 cases. These data provide evidence that asymptomatic HSV-2 shedding contributes to chronic inflammation throughout the genital tract.
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Sample Size for a Binomial Proportion with Autocorrelation.
Stat Commun Infect Dis
PUBLISHED: 10-24-2011
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A flexible sample size computation is desired for a binomial outcome consisting of repeated binary measures with autocorrelation over time. This type of outcome is common in viral shedding studies, in which each individuals outcome is a proportion: the number of samples on which virus is detected out of number of samples assessed. Autocorrelation between proximal samples occurs in some conditions such as herpes infection, in which reactivation is episodic. We determine a sample size computation that accounts for: (1) participant-level differences in outcome frequency, (2) autocorrelation in time between samples, and (3) varying number of samples per participant. In addition, we develop a computation appropriate for crossover designs that accounts for the dependence of the investigational treatment effect on the pretreatment detection frequency. The computations are validated through comparison with real and simulated data, and sensitivity to misspecification of parameter values is examined graphically.
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Hand, foot, and mouth disease in China: patterns of spread and transmissibility.
Epidemiology
PUBLISHED: 10-05-2011
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There were large outbreaks of hand, foot, and mouth disease in both 2008 and 2009 in China.
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Nutrient intake and anemia risk in the womens health initiative observational study.
J Am Diet Assoc
PUBLISHED: 03-30-2011
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Nutrient-related anemia among postmenopausal women is preventable; recent data on prevalence are limited.
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Predictors of survival after a diagnosis of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in a resource-limited setting: a retrospective study on the impact of HIV infection and its treatment.
J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr.
PUBLISHED: 02-26-2011
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We examined factors associated with survival among patients with newly diagnosed non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in Uganda.
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Case-crossover analysis of condom use and herpes simplex virus type 2 acquisition.
Sex Transm Dis
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Although growing evidence suggests that condoms offer moderate protection against herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), inability to control for unknown or unmeasured confounders associated with sexual activity may reduce the accuracy of the estimates. The case-crossover design offers increased control of individual-level confounders, and was thus used with the aim of producing a more accurate estimate of the effect of condom use on HSV-2 acquisition.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.