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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Quantitative and qualitative differences in the T cell response to HIV in uninfected Ugandans exposed or unexposed to HIV-infected partners.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 06-12-2013
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HIV-exposed and yet persistently uninfected individuals have been an intriguing, repeated observation in multiple studies, but uncertainty persists on the significance and implications of this in devising protective strategies against HIV. We carried out a cross-sectional analysis of exposed uninfected partners in a Ugandan cohort of heterosexual serodiscordant couples (37.5% antiretroviral therapy naive) comparing their T cell responses to HIV peptides with those of unexposed uninfected individuals. We used an objective definition of exposure and inclusion criteria, blinded ex vivo and cultured gamma interferon (IFN-?) enzyme-linked immunospot assays, and multiparameter flow cytometry and intracellular cytokine staining to investigate the features of the HIV-specific response in exposed versus unexposed uninfected individuals. A response rate to HIV was detectable in unexposed uninfected (5.7%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.3 to 8.1%) and, at a significantly higher level (12.5%, 95% CI = 9.7 to 15.4%, P = 0.0004), in exposed uninfected individuals. The response rate to Gag was significantly higher in exposed uninfected (10/50 [20.%]) compared to unexposed uninfected (1/35 [2.9%]) individuals (P = 0.0004). The magnitude of responses was also greater in exposed uninfected individuals but not statistically significant. The average number of peptide pools recognized was significantly higher in exposed uninfected subjects than in unexposed uninfected subjects (1.21 versus 0.47; P = 0.0106). The proportion of multifunctional responses was different in the two groups, with a higher proportion of single cytokine responses, mostly IFN-?, in unexposed uninfected individuals compared to exposed uninfected individuals. Our findings demonstrate both quantitative and qualitative differences in T cell reactivity to HIV between HESN (HIV exposed seronegative) and HUSN (HIV unexposed seronegative) subject groups but do not discriminate as to whether they represent markers of exposure or of protection against HIV infection.
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Profile of T cell recognition of HIV type 1 consensus group M Gag and Nef peptides in a clade A1- and D-infected Ugandan population.
AIDS Res. Hum. Retroviruses
PUBLISHED: 10-17-2011
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Reagents for evaluating non-clade B HIV-specific T cell responses are uncommon. Peptides based on highly conserved HIV-1 consensus group M sequences that are phylogenetically closer to most circulating strains may provide potential alternative reagents in populations with diverse infections, and may be relevant for vaccine design. Recognition of such reagents in clade A1-and D-infected populations has not been previously evaluated. Interferon (IFN)-? ELISpot assay was used to evaluate T cell recognition of Gag and Nef peptides based on consensus group M sequences in 50 treatment-naive adults predominantly infected with HIV-1 clades A1 and D. Gag-induced T cell responses were correlated with gag sequence diversity. Infecting clades were determined from gag sequences for 45 of the 50 subjects as 40% clade A1 (18/45), 45% clade D (20/45), 2% clade C (1/45), 2% A1/C recombinant (1/45), 2% A1/D (1/45), 7% CRF10_CD (3/45), and 2% U (unclassifiable) (1/45). The mean genetic divergence and diversity of clade A and D gag region compared to group M consensus sequences at synonymous and nonsynonymous nucleotide and amino acid levels were not always significant. Gag peptides were targeted at significantly higher frequency [88% (44/50)] than Nef [64% (32/50)]; p=0.014, although their mean IFN-? magnitudes were comparable ([3703 (95% CI 2567-4839)] vs. [2120 (95% CI 478-3762)]), respectively. Measurable virus-induced IFN-? responses were detected in 96% (48/50) individuals, primarily targeting the more conserved Gag p24 and Nef central core regions. Use of these reagents to screen for HIV-specific IFN-? responses may mitigate the challenge of viral diversity; although this targeting is apparently biased toward a few highly conserved epitopes.
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CD8 T-Cell Responses before and after Structured Treatment Interruption in Ugandan Adults Who Initiated ART with CD4 T Cells <200?Cell/?L: The DART Trial STI Substudy.
AIDS Res Treat
PUBLISHED: 01-18-2011
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Objective. To better understand attributes of ART-associated HIV-induced T-cell responses that might be therapeutically harnessed. Methods. CD8(+) T-cell responses were evaluated in some HIV-1 chronically infected participants of the fixed duration STI substudy of the DART trial. Magnitudes, breadths, and functionality of IFN-? and Perforin responses were compared in STI (n = 42) and continuous treatment (CT) (n = 46) before and after a single STI cycle when the DART STI trial was stopped early due to inferior clinical outcome in STI participants. Results. STI and CT had comparable magnitudes and breadths of monofunctional CD8(+)IFN?(+) and CD8(+)Perforin(+) responses. However, STI was associated with significant decline in breadth of bi-functional (CD8(+)IFN?(+)Perforin(+)) responses; P = .02, Mann-Whitney test. Conclusions. STI in individuals initiated onto ART at <200 CD4(+) T-cell counts/?l significantly reduced occurrence of bifunctional CD8(+)IFN?(+)/Perforin(+) responses. These data add to others that found no evidence to support STI as a strategy to improve HIV-specific immunity during ART.
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Host HLA B*allele-associated multi-clade Gag T-cell recognition correlates with slow HIV-1 disease progression in antiretroviral therapy-naïve Ugandans.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2009
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Some HIV infected individuals remain asymptomatic for protracted periods of time in the absence of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Virological control, CD4 T cell loss and HIV-specific responses are some of the key interrelated determinants of HIV-1 disease progression. In this study, possible interactions between viral load, CD4 T cell slopes, host genetics and HIV-specific IFN-gamma responses were evaluated in chronically HIV-1-infected adults.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.