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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Intimate Partner Violence Perpetrators in a Forensic Psychiatric Outpatient Setting: Criminal History, Psychopathology, and Victimization.
J Interpers Violence
PUBLISHED: 10-08-2014
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This study investigated criminological, psychopathological, and victimological profiles of intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetrators in a sample of 119 Dutch female and male forensic psychiatric outpatients aged 18 to 58 years. In addition, differences in criminological, psychopathological, and victimological factors between IPV perpetrators (n = 61, 51.3%) and non-intimate violence (NIV) perpetrators (n = 58, 48.7%) were examined. All data, including information on demographics, criminal history, history of psychological, sexual, and physical victimization during childhood or adolescence, family history of psychopathology, history of psychopathology in childhood and adolescence, and mental disorders, were derived from archival electronic medical records. Mental disorders were measured using structured psychiatric interviews and final consensus diagnoses were established during weekly case consultations. Both IPV and NIV perpetrators displayed high rates of criminal history, psychopathology, and previous victimization, but the two groups did not differ in these factors with two exceptions. IPV perpetrators were significantly more likely to have higher rates of previous physical victimization and intermittent explosive disorder than NIV perpetrators. The current study suggests that a history of physical victimization and intermittent explosive disorder are specific characteristics of IPV perpetrators in a forensic psychiatric outpatient setting. Future research should focus on mechanisms explaining the association of childhood victimization and IPV and increase our understanding of the role of intermittent explosive disorder in IPV.
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Impact of mild thyroid hormone deficiency in pregnancy on cognitive function in children: lessons from the Generation R Study.
Best Pract. Res. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab.
PUBLISHED: 03-18-2014
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Animal models and epidemiological studies suggest that mild maternal thyroid hormone deficiency in early gestation has adverse consequences on the cognitive abilities of the children. However, methodological problems, lack of a consistent definition for mild thyroid hormone deficiency, and short follow-up of the children reduce the confidence in the conclusion of existing studies. In this review, we summarize the main findings of a series of studies performed in Generation R, a population-based birth cohort in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. In this iodine sufficient region, we aimed to investigate the relation between mild maternal thyroid hormone deficiency in early gestation and children's verbal and nonverbal cognitive function and executive function. We discuss the main findings of these studies, present recommendations for clinicians and formulate suggestions for future research.
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Criminal victimisation in people with severe mental illness: a multi-site prevalence and incidence survey in the Netherlands.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Although crime victimisation is as prevalent in psychiatric patients as crime perpetration (and possibly more so), few European figures for it are available. We therefore assessed its one-year prevalence and incident rates in Dutch severely mentally ill outpatients, and compared the results with victimisation rates in the general population.
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Early lexical development and risk of verbal and nonverbal cognitive delay at school age.
Acta Paediatr.
PUBLISHED: 06-06-2013
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To characterise the relationship between preschool lexical delay and language comprehension and nonverbal intelligence at school age.
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Early infant neuromotor assessment is associated with language and nonverbal cognitive function in toddlers: the Generation R Study.
J Dev Behav Pediatr
PUBLISHED: 05-28-2013
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Numerous studies in high-risk populations established that variations in infant neuromotor development predict poor cognitive function. It is unclear whether this association is found in the general population. Moreover, previous population-based studies mostly focused on motor milestone achievement.
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Maternal hypothyroxinemia and effects on cognitive functioning in childhood: how and why?
Clin. Endocrinol. (Oxf)
PUBLISHED: 02-27-2013
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Exposure to maternal hypothyroxinemia during pregnancy, which is characterized by low free T4 but normal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels, can negatively affect the foetus. This review provides an overview of present findings concerning the association between maternal hypothyroxinemia during pregnancy and childhood cognitive functioning. Possible causes of maternal hypothyroxinemia and potential mechanisms underlying this association are also discussed. Clinical and epidemiological studies suggest that maternal hypothyroxinemia in the first half of pregnancy but not later in pregnancy impairs cognitive development in infancy and childhood. Animal models confirm that the first half of pregnancy may constitute a sensitive period in which maternal hypothyroxinemia alters neurogenesis and causes neuronal migration errors in the developing foetal brain. However, observational studies in humans cannot demonstrate causality of the association between hypothyroxinemia and neurodevelopment. In the only completed randomized trial of antenatal thyroid screening and subsequent levothyroxine treatment of mild maternal subclinical thyroid dysfunction, including hypothyroxinemia, the interventions did not affect offspring intelligence quotient (IQ). More randomized trials are needed investigating whether screening for hypothyroxinemia and its treatment earlier in the first trimester of pregnancy can improve child cognitive functioning or prevent neurodevelopmental changes. Long-term observational studies should identify molecular, neuroanatomical and neurophysiological factors involved in the association between maternal hypothyroxinemia and offspring cognitive functioning. Information on such mechanisms can be used for the development of innovative prevention and intervention studies that address maternal hypothyroxinemia and its potential consequences.
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Diurnal cortisol rhythm and cognitive functioning in toddlers: The Generation R Study.
Child Neuropsychol
PUBLISHED: 02-08-2013
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Little is known about the relationship between diurnal cortisol secretion patterns and cognitive function early in life. This population-based study examined whether diurnal cortisol rhythms and cognitive functioning in toddlers are related. Within the Generation R Study, parents of 364 infants (median age: 14.2 months) collected saliva samples at five moments during one day. We assessed the diurnal cortisol rhythm by calculating the area under the curve (AUC), the cortisol awakening response (CAR), and the diurnal slope. Verbal cognitive functioning and fine motor development was determined at age 18 months. Nonverbal cognitive functioning was assessed at age 30 months. A more positive CAR was associated with a lower risk of delay in language comprehension (OR per 1-SD CAR: 0.62, 95%CI: 0.40-0.98, p = .04), a lower risk of nonoptimal fine motor development (OR per 1-SD slope: 0.74, 95%CI: 0.57-0.96, p = .03), and a lower risk of delay in nonverbal cognitive development (OR per 1-SD CAR: 0.58, 95%CI: 0.38-0.90, p = .02). Also, children with flatter slopes had a lower risk of delay in nonverbal cognitive development (OR per 1-SD slope: 0.51, 95%CI: 0.34-0.76, p = .001). Higher AUC levels were associated with a higher risk of delay in language production. These results show that variations in diurnal cortisol rhythms are already associated with variations in cognitive functioning at a young age. Infants with a diurnal cortisol pattern indicative of less stress and more cortisol reactivity, that is, lower AUC levels and a more positive CAR, show a lower risk of delay in cognitive functioning as toddlers.
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Long-term outcome and quality of life after arterial switch operation: a prospective study with a historical comparison.
Congenit Heart Dis
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2013
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AIM.: The study aims to describe the long-term cardiological and psychological results of our first surgical cohort of arterial switch operation (ASO) patients and compare the results with our earlier series of Mustard patients. METHODS.: Twenty-four survivors of ASO operated in our center (1985-1990) were evaluated by electrocardiography, echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging, exercise testing, 24-hour Holter-monitoring, and health-related quality of life questionnaire. The results were compared with 58 adult Mustard patients who were evaluated in 2001 using the same study protocol. RESULTS.: Arterial switch operation was performed at a median age of 13 days and Mustard operation at 2 years. Median follow-up was 22 years (range 20-25) and 25 years (22-29), respectively. After ASO, survival was better (P =.04). The event-free survival after 22 years was 77% after ASO vs. 44% after Mustard (P =.03). Good systemic ventricular function was present in 93% after ASO vs. 6% after Mustard (P <.01). Exercise capacity in ASO was 85% of predicted, compared with 72% in Mustard patients (P =.01). Aortic regurgitation was found in 21% of ASO patients vs. 16% in Mustard patients. Arterial switch patients vs. Mustard patients reported significantly better quality of life and less somatic complaints. CONCLUSION.: The progression made in surgical treatment for transposition of the great arteries from Mustard to ASO has had a positive impact on survival, cardiac function, exercise capacity, and also self-reported quality of life and somatic complaints. Longer follow-up is warranted to monitor aortic regurgitation.
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Correlates of physical activity in 2-year-old toddlers: the generation R study.
J. Pediatr.
PUBLISHED: 01-10-2013
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To describe and identify correlates of objectively measured physical activity and sedentary behavior in 2-year-old toddlers.
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Prenatal and postnatal psychological symptoms of parents and family functioning: the impact on child emotional and behavioural problems.
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 04-13-2011
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Although relations of various parental psychological problems and family functioning with child development are well documented, it remains unclear whether specific prenatal or specific postnatal risk factors are independently associated with child emotional and behavioural problems, or whether observed associations can be explained by general parental psychopathology. Using a stepwise approach, we examined the effects of prenatal and postnatal parental depressive symptoms, prenatal and postnatal hostility of the parents, as well as prenatal family functioning on the risk of child emotional and behavioural problems. This study was embedded in Generation R: a population-based cohort from foetal life onwards. Mothers and fathers of 2,698 children provided information about depressive symptoms, symptoms of hostility and family functioning during pregnancy and 3 years after birth. Mother and father each reported on child behaviour when the child was 3 years old. Parental depressive symptoms increased the risk of child emotional and behavioural problems, but this increase was explained by postnatal parental hostile behaviour. Postnatal symptoms of hostility of mothers (OR = 1.34, p value <0.001) and postnatal symptoms of hostility of fathers (OR = 1.30, p value <0.001) each contributed independently to the risk of child emotional and behavioural problems. Postnatal parental hostility is associated with an increased risk of child emotional and behavioural problems, independent of parental depressive symptoms. These findings suggest that prevention and intervention strategies should focus on psychological symptoms of both mothers and fathers, in particular on hostile behaviour, in families with young children.
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Maternal thyroid function during pregnancy and behavioral problems in the offspring: the generation R study.
Pediatr. Res.
PUBLISHED: 04-08-2011
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Maternal thyroid function during pregnancy is implicated in the neurodevelopment of the offspring, yet little is known about the effect of maternal thyroid parameters on the behavior of children. We investigated the association of maternal thyroid function during the first half of pregnancy with parent-reported problem behavior of the offspring up to age of 3 y. In the Generation R study, a population-based cohort of 3736 children and their mothers, data on maternal thyroid function and childs behavior were examined. The degree of internalizing and externalizing problems in the children were assessed with the Child Behavior Checklist at ages 1½ and 3 y. Higher levels of maternal TSH during pregnancy predicted a higher externalizing scores in children at 1½ and 3 y (B = 0.22 per SD of TSH; 95% CI: 0.04, 0.40; B = 0.10 per SD for internalizing scores; 95% CI: -0.01, 0.21). Maternal free thyroxine (T4) and total T4 were not associated with internalizing or externalizing scores of children. The linear relationship with more externalizing scores was across the range of TSH; this implies that subtle impairments of maternal thyroid function may affect the child. The results suggest that thyroid function is crucial for fetal brain development, which determines problem behavior later in life.
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Examining continuity of early expressive vocabulary development: the generation R study.
J. Speech Lang. Hear. Res.
PUBLISHED: 10-21-2010
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The authors investigated continuity and discontinuity of vocabulary skills in a population-based cohort in the Netherlands.
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Maternal thyroid function during early pregnancy and cognitive functioning in early childhood: the generation R study.
J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab.
PUBLISHED: 06-09-2010
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Thyroid hormones are essential for neurodevelopment from early pregnancy onward. Yet population-based data on the association between maternal thyroid function in early pregnancy and childrens cognitive development are sparse.
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Fetal growth from mid- to late pregnancy is associated with infant development: the Generation R Study.
Dev Med Child Neurol
PUBLISHED: 10-13-2009
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The aim of this study was to investigate within a population-based cohort of 4384 infants (2182 males, 2202 females) whether fetal growth from early pregnancy onwards is related to infant development and whether this potential relationship is independent of postnatal growth.
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Fetal size in mid- and late pregnancy is related to infant alertness: the generation R study.
Dev Psychobiol
PUBLISHED: 07-14-2009
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The vulnerability for behavioral problems is partly shaped in fetal life. Numerous studies have related indicators of intrauterine growth, for example, birth weight and body size, to behavioral development. We investigated whether fetal size in mid- and late pregnancy is related to infant irritability and alertness. In a population-based birth cohort of 4,255 singleton full-term infants ultrasound measurements of fetal head and abdominal circumference in mid- and late pregnancy were performed. Infant irritability and alertness scores were obtained by the Mother and Baby Scales at 3 months and z-standardized. Multiple linear regression analyses revealed curvilinear associations (inverted J-shape) of measures of fetal size in both mid- and late pregnancy with infant alertness. Fetal size characteristics were not associated with infant irritability. These results suggest that alterations of intrauterine growth affecting infant alertness are already detectable from mid-pregnancy onwards.
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Early vocabulary delay and behavioral/emotional problems in early childhood: the generation R study.
J. Speech Lang. Hear. Res.
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The authors tested associations between (a) parent-reported temporary vs. persistent vocabulary delay and (b) parent-reported behavioral/emotional problems in a sample of 5,497 young Dutch children participating in a prospective population-based study.
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Correlates of posttraumatic stress disorder in forensic psychiatric outpatients in the Netherlands.
J Trauma Stress
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Using a sample of 154 Dutch forensic psychiatric outpatients aged 18-62 years, this study investigated whether risk factors of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), mainly identified in nonforensic research, forensic psychiatric factors, and potential comorbid mental disorders were associated with PTSD. Data on demographics, victimization during childhood or adolescence, and forensic psychiatric factors were derived from electronic medical records. Mental disorders were assessed using structured psychiatric interviews and consensus diagnoses were established during weekly case consultations. The PTSD rate was 75% in the sample. Whereas the PTSD group was significantly more likely to be older, female, not Dutch, and to have a history of victimization, previously perpetrated family violence, and lower psychosocial and occupational functioning than the non-PTSD group, the latter group had significantly higher rates of psychiatric history, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), antisocial personality disorder, drug abuse, and previous repeated nonfamily violence perpetration. Effect sizes ranged from Nagelkerke R(2) = .04 for psychosocial and occupational functioning to Nagelkerke R(2) = .70 for ADHD. This study demonstrated differences between those with and without PTSD in demographic, victim, forensic, and psychological characteristics. Future studies should examine the complexity between early victimization, delinquency patterns, and psychopathology regarding the prediction of PTSD among forensic psychiatric outpatients.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.