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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Quantification of blood flow and topology in developing vascular networks.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Since fluid dynamics plays a critical role in vascular remodeling, quantification of the hemodynamics is crucial to gain more insight into this complex process. Better understanding of vascular development can improve prediction of the process, and may eventually even be used to influence the vascular structure. In this study, a methodology to quantify hemodynamics and network structure of developing vascular networks is described. The hemodynamic parameters and topology are derived from detailed local blood flow velocities, obtained by in vivo micro-PIV measurements. The use of such detailed flow measurements is shown to be essential, as blood vessels with a similar diameter can have a large variation in flow rate. Measurements are performed in the yolk sacs of seven chicken embryos at two developmental stages between HH 13+ and 17+. A large range of flow velocities (1 µm/s to 1 mm/s) is measured in blood vessels with diameters in the range of 25-500 µm. The quality of the data sets is investigated by verifying the flow balances in the branching points. This shows that the quality of the data sets of the seven embryos is comparable for all stages observed, and the data is suitable for further analysis with known accuracy. When comparing two subsequently characterized networks of the same embryo, vascular remodeling is observed in all seven networks. However, the character of remodeling in the seven embryos differs and can be non-intuitive, which confirms the necessity of quantification. To illustrate the potential of the data, we present a preliminary quantitative study of key network topology parameters and we compare these with theoretical design rules.
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Zebrafish embryo development in a microfluidic flow-through system.
Lab Chip
PUBLISHED: 04-14-2011
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The zebrafish embryo is a small, cheap, whole-animal model which may replace rodents in some areas of research. Unfortunately, zebrafish embryos are commonly cultured in microtitre plates using cell-culture protocols with static buffer replacement. Such protocols are highly invasive, consume large quantities of reagents and do not readily permit high-quality imaging. Zebrafish and rodent embryos have previously been cultured in static microfluidic drops, and zebrafish embryos have also been raised in a prototype polydimethylsiloxane setup in a Petri dish. Other than this, no animal embryo has ever been shown to undergo embryonic development in a microfluidic flow-through system. We have developed and prototyped a specialized lab-on-a-chip made from bonded layers of borosilicate glass. We find that zebrafish embryos can develop in the chip for 5 days, with continuous buffer flow at pressures of 0.005-0.04 MPa. Phenotypic effects were seen, but these were scored subjectively as minor. Survival rates of 100% could be reached with buffer flows of 2 µL per well per min. High-quality imaging was possible. An acute ethanol exposure test in the chip replicated the same assay performed in microtitre plates. More than 100 embryos could be cultured in an area, excluding infrastructure, smaller than a credit card. We discuss how biochip technology, coupled with zebrafish larvae, could allow biological research to be conducted in massive, parallel experiments, at high speed and low cost.
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Characteristics of the turbulent/non-turbulent interface of a non-isothermal jet.
Philos Trans A Math Phys Eng Sci
PUBLISHED: 01-19-2011
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The turbulent/non-turbulent interface of a jet is characterized by sharp jumps (discontinuities) in the conditional flow statistics relative to the interface. Experiments were carried out to measure the conditional flow statistics for a non-isothermal jet, i.e. a cooled jet. These experiments are complementary to previous experiments on an isothermal Re=2000 jet, where, in the present experiments on a non-isothermal jet, the thermal diffusivity is intermediate to the diffusivity of momentum and the diffusivity of mass. The experimental method is a combined laser-induced fluorescence/particle image velocimetry method, where a temperature-sensitive fluorescent dye (rhodamine 6G) is used to measure the instantaneous temperature fluctuations. The results show that the cooled jet can be considered to behave like a self-similar jet without any significant buoyancy effects. The detection of the interface is based on the instantaneous temperature, and provides a reliable means to detect the interface. Conditional flow statistics reveal the superlayer jump in the conditional vorticity and in the temperature.
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Tunable hydrodynamic chromatography of microparticles localized in short microchannels.
Anal. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 04-29-2010
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This paper describes a new way to perform hydrodynamic chromatography (HDC) for the size separation of particles based on a unique recirculating flow pattern. Pressure-driven (PF) and electro-osmotic flows (EOF) are opposed in narrow glass microchannels that expand at both ends. The resulting bidirectional flow turns into recirculating flow because of nonuniform microchannel dimensions. This hydrodynamic effect, combined with the electrokinetic migration of the particles themselves, results in a trapping phenomenon, which we have termed flow-induced electrokinetic trapping (FIET). In this paper, we exploit recirculating flow and FIET to perform a size-based separation of samples of microparticles trapped in a short separation channel using a HDC approach. Because these particles have the same charge (same zeta potential), they exhibit the same electrophoretic mobility, but they can be separated according to size in the recirculating flow. While trapped, particles have a net drift velocity toward the low-pressure end of the channel. When, because of a change in the externally applied PF or electric field, the sign of the net drift velocity reverses, particles can escape the separation channel in the direction of EOF. Larger particles exhibit a larger net drift velocity opposing EOF, so that the smaller particles escape the separation channel first. In the example presented here, a sample plug containing 2.33 and 2.82 microm polymer particles was introduced from the inlet into a 3-mm-long separation channel and trapped. Through tuning of the electric field with respect to the applied PF, the particles could be separated, with the advantage that larger particles remained trapped. The separation of particles with less than 500 nm differences in diameter was performed with an analytical resolution comparable to that of baseline separation in chromatography. When the sample was not trapped in the separation channel but located further downstream, separations could be carried out continuously rather than in batch. Smaller particles could successfully pass through the separation channel, and particles were separated by size. One of the main advantages of exploiting FIET for HDC is that this method can be applied in quite short (a few millimeters) channel geometries. This is in great contrast to examples published to date for the separation of nanoparticles in much longer micro- and nanochannels.
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Nanoparticle image velocimetry at topologically structured surfaces.
Biomicrofluidics
PUBLISHED: 09-10-2009
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Nanoparticle image velocimetry (nano-PIV), based on total internal reflection fluorescent microscopy, is very useful to investigate fluid flows within approximately 100 nm from a surface; but so far it has only been applied to flow over smooth surfaces. Here we show that it can also be applied to flow over a topologically structured surface, provided that the surface structures can be carefully configured not to disrupt the evanescent-wave illumination. We apply nano-PIV to quantify the flow velocity distribution over a polydimethylsiloxane surface, with a periodic gratinglike structure (with 215 nm height and 2 mum period) fabricated using our customized multilevel lithography method. The measured tracer displacement data are in good agreement with the computed theoretical values. These results demonstrate new possibilities to study the interactions between fluid flow and topologically structured surfaces.
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Micro-Particle Image Velocimetry (microPIV): recent developments, applications, and guidelines.
Lab Chip
PUBLISHED: 06-02-2009
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In this review we discuss the state of the art of the optical whole-field velocity measurement technique micro-scale Particle Image Velocimetry (microPIV). microPIV is a useful tool for fundamental research of microfluidics as well as for the detailed characterization and optimization of microfluidic applications in life science, lab-on-a-chip, biomedical research, micro chemical engineering, analytical chemistry and other related fields of research. An in depth description of the microPIV method is presented and compared to other flow visualization and measurement methods. An overview of the most relevant applications is given on the topics of near-wall flow, electrokinetic flow, biological flow, mixing, two-phase flow, turbulence transition and complex fluid dynamic problems. Current trends and applications are critically reviewed. Guidelines for the implementation and application are also discussed.
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The flow structure of a puff.
Philos Trans A Math Phys Eng Sci
PUBLISHED: 03-28-2009
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From time-resolved stereoscopic particle image velocimetry measurements over the entire circular cross section of a pipe, a first-of-its-kind quasi-instantaneous three-dimensional velocity field of a turbulent puff at a low Reynolds number is reconstructed. At the trailing edge of the puff, where the laminar flow undergoes transition to turbulence, pairs of counterrotating streamwise vortices are observed that form the legs of large hairpin vortices. At the upstream end of the puff, a quasi-periodic regeneration of streamwise vortices takes place. Initially, the vortex structure resembles a travelling wave solution, but as the vortices propagate into the turbulent region of the puff, they continue to develop into strong hairpin vortices. These hairpin vortices extract so much energy from the mean flow that they cannot be sustained. This structure provides a possible explanation for the intermittent character of the puffs in pipe flow at low Reynolds numbers.
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Tapered microfluidic chip for the study of biochemical and mechanical response at subcellular level of endothelial cells to shear flow.
Lab Chip
PUBLISHED: 02-27-2009
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A lab-on-a-chip application for the investigation of biochemical and mechanical response of individual endothelial cells to different fluid dynamical conditions is presented. A microfluidic flow chamber design with a tapered geometry that creates a pre-defined, homogeneous shear stress gradient on the cell layer is described and characterized. A non-intrusive, non-tactile measurement method based on micro-PIV is used for the determination of the topography and shear stress distribution over individual cells with subcellular resolution. The cellular gene expression is measured simultaneously with the shape and shear stress distribution of the cell. With this set-up the response of the cells on different pre-defined shear stress levels is investigated without the influence of variations in repetitive experiments. Results are shown on cultured endothelial cells related to the promoter activity of the shear-responsive transcription factor KLF2 driving the marker gene for green fluorescent protein.
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Accurate blood flow measurements: are artificial tracers necessary?
PLoS ONE
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Imaging-based blood flow measurement techniques, such as particle image velocimetry, have become an important tool in cardiovascular research. They provide quantitative information about blood flow, which benefits applications ranging from developmental biology to tumor perfusion studies. Studies using these methods can be classified based on whether they use artificial tracers or red blood cells to visualize the fluid motion. We here present the first direct comparison in vivo of both methods. For high magnification cases, the experiments using red blood cells strongly underestimate the flow (up to 50% in the present case), as compared to the tracer results. For medium magnification cases, the results from both methods are indistinguishable as they give the same underestimation of the real velocities (approximately 33%, based on in vitro reference measurements). These results suggest that flow characteristics reported in literature cannot be compared without a careful evaluation of the imaging characteristics. A method to predict the expected flow averaging behavior for a particular facility is presented.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.