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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Unintended Birth Among Hispanic Women in Texas: A Descriptive Analysis.
Matern Child Health J
PUBLISHED: 11-05-2014
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Unintended birth is associated with adverse maternal and infant outcomes. In 2006, US Hispanics had the highest unintended birth rate (45 births/1,000 women) compared to other groups. One-fifth of US Hispanic women reside in Texas, yet unintended birth among Texas Hispanics has not been studied. The goal of this study was to describe the prevalence and characteristics of unintended birth in this population. Using data from Hispanic participants in the Texas Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System 2009-2010, we studied unintended birth in relation to demographic, lifestyle and partner characteristics. Adjusted prevalence odds ratios (POR) were computed for each characteristic and the analysis was stratified by maternal nativity (US vs foreign born). The weighted proportion of unintended birth was 49.5 % (CI = 45.9-52.6). In adjusted analyses, women aged 12-19 had a higher prevalence of unintended birth compared to ?20 years (POR = 2.1, CI = 1.3-3.7). Unmarried (POR = 1.5, CI = 1.1-2.1), uninsured (POR = 1.7, CI = 1.2-2.3), and US-born (POR = 1.6, CI = 1.0-2.6) women had higher prevalence compared to married, insured and foreign-born women, respectively. Among US-born Hispanic women, higher prevalence of unintended birth was associated with being young, unmarried and experiencing psychological stressors within 12 months of giving birth; among foreign-born Hispanic women, higher prevalence was associated with lack of insurance. Efforts to reduce unintended birth in Texas might focus on young, single, uninsured and US-born Hispanic women. Analyses of other pre-pregnancy factors and health outcomes among Texas Hispanics could increase understanding of the differences we observed in unintended birth between US and foreign-born Hispanics.
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Decision-Making About Method of Delivery on the U.S.-Mexico Border.
Health Care Women Int
PUBLISHED: 11-04-2014
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Abstract We explored how low-risk, nulliparous pregnant women and their doctors in two contiguous U.S.-Mexico border communities communicate about methods of delivery and how they perceive that the delivery method decision is made. We recruited 18 women through obstetricians in El Paso, Texas (n = 10) and prenatal care providers in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico (n = 8). We observed prenatal care visits, interviewed women prenatally and postpartum, and interviewed the El Paso obstetricians. Qualitative analysis demonstrated that birthing decisions are complex and involve multiple influences, including women's level of knowledge about birth, doctor-patient communication, and women's participation in decision-making.
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Adolescent Births in the Border Region: A Descriptive Analysis Based on US Hispanic and Mexican Birth Certificates.
Matern Child Health J
PUBLISHED: 05-14-2014
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Adolescent childbearing adversely affects both mothers and infants. The birth rate for US adolescent women of Hispanic origin is higher than that for US adolescents overall. Birth rates among US Hispanic adolescents in the border region are higher than rates among other US Hispanic adolescents, and rates among Mexican border adolescents are higher than rates among other Mexican adolescents. We used binational birth certificate data for US Hispanic and Mexican adolescent women living inside the border region, elsewhere within the border states, and in the US and Mexico overall to compare birth rates and other health indicators among these groups. From 2000 to 2009, birth rates for 15-19 year-olds declined 19-28 % among US Hispanic geographic subgroups and 8-13 % among Mexican geographic subgroups; rates in the border region in 2009 were 73.8/1,000 women ages 15-19 for US Hispanics and 87.2/1,000 for Mexicans and were higher than rates in other US and Mexican subgroups, respectively. Less than one in five US Hispanic and Mexican adolescent mothers in the border region was married. About one in three delivered by cesarean. Late or no prenatal care was more prevalent among US Hispanic (17.6 %) than Mexican (14.3 %) border adolescents. Birth weight and gestational age outcomes were generally poorest in Texas border counties compared with border counties in other US states and in municipios of Mexican states bordering Texas. High birth rates and low prenatal care utilization among adolescents are problems along the US-Mexico border.
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Cesarean Birth in the Border Region: A Descriptive Analysis Based on US Hispanic and Mexican Birth Certificates.
Matern Child Health J
PUBLISHED: 05-06-2014
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Cesarean birth (CB) is more prevalent in the US-Mexico border region than among all US Hispanics. Comparable data from US and Mexican birth certificates can be used to compare prevalence and identify risk factors on either side of the border. Using 2009 US and Mexican birth certificates, we compared the characteristics of US Hispanic and Mexican CBs in six geographic subgroups: US and Mexican border counties/municipios, US and Mexican non-border counties/municipios and the US and Mexico overall. We also explored cesarean prevalence over time. During 2000-2009, CB rates increased from 22.1 to 31.6 % among US Hispanics and from 25.9 to 37.9 % among Hispanics in the US border region. 2009 rates were 44.5 % in Mexico and 43.1 % in the Mexican border region. In both countries, CB rates were similar for primiparas and multiparas. Higher education, being married and parity >4 were associated with CB in Mexico; being married was associated in the US. Hispanic rates were higher in the US border than non-border region for all age groups. Along the border, cesarean rates for Hispanics were highest in Texas (43.5 %) and neighboring Tamaulipas (49.8 %). Higher cesarean prevalence in Mexico than in US Hispanics, while unexplained, is consistent with high prevalence in some Latin American countries. Higher cesarean prevalence among Hispanics in the US border region than among Hispanics nationwide cannot be explained by maternal age or parity. Medical indications are also unlikely to explain such high rates, which are undesirable for mothers and infants.
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A binational overview of reproductive health outcomes among US Hispanic and Mexican women in the border region.
Prev Chronic Dis
PUBLISHED: 08-17-2013
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The US-Mexico border region has 15 million residents and 300,000 births annually. Reproductive health concerns have been identified on both sides of the border, but comparable information about reproductive health is not available. The objective of this study was to compare reproductive health indicators among populations in this region.
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Mortality risk of black women and white women with invasive breast cancer by hormone receptors, HER2, and p53 status.
BMC Cancer
PUBLISHED: 05-01-2013
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Black women are more likely than white women to have an aggressive subtype of breast cancer that is associated with higher mortality and this may contribute to the observed black-white difference in mortality. However, few studies have investigated the black-white disparity in mortality risk stratified by breast cancer subtype, defined by estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status. Furthermore, it is not known whether additional consideration of p53 protein status influences black-white differences in mortality risk observed when considering subtypes defined by ER, PR and HER2 status.
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Quantitative measures of estrogen receptor expression in relation to breast cancer-specific mortality risk among white women and black women.
Breast Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 03-21-2013
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The association of breast cancer patients mortality with estrogen receptor (ER) status (ER+ versus ER-) has been well studied. However, little attention has been paid to the relationship between the quantitative measures of ER expression and mortality.
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Obesity and survival among black women and white women 35 to 64 years of age at diagnosis with invasive breast cancer.
J. Clin. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 07-25-2011
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To evaluate the effect of obesity on survival among black women and white women with invasive breast cancer and to determine whether obesity explains the poorer survival of black women relative to white women.
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Oral contraceptive formulation and risk of breast cancer.
Contraception
PUBLISHED: 05-27-2011
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While evidence on the association between oral contraceptive (OC) use and breast cancer generally suggests little or no increased risk, the question of whether breast cancer risk varies by OC formulation remains controversial. Few studies have examined this issue because large samples and extensive OC histories are required.
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Oral contraceptive use and survival in women with invasive breast cancer.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 05-06-2011
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Oral contraceptives (OC) are widely used in the United States. Although the relation between OC use and breast cancer incidence has been widely studied, the few studies examining associations between OC use prior to breast cancer diagnosis and survival are inconsistent.
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Breast cancer risk and ovariectomy, hysterectomy, and tubal sterilization in the womens contraceptive and reproductive experiences study.
Am. J. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 11-25-2010
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Removal or impairment of ovaries before menopause may affect a womans breast cancer risk by altering her cumulative exposure to ovarian hormones. The Womens Contraceptive and Reproductive Experiences Study, a population-based, multicenter case-control study of incident invasive breast cancer, recruited women aged 35-64 years (4,490 cases and 4,611 controls) who provided data on ovariectomy, hysterectomy, and tubal sterilization during in-person interviews. Controls were frequency-matched to cases by age, race, and study site. Unconditional logistic regression analysis was used. Women who had not undergone premenopausal reproductive surgery were the referent group. Bilateral ovariectomy was associated with reduced breast cancer risk overall (odds ratio (OR) = 0.59, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.50, 0.69) and among women <45 years of age (ORs ranged from 0.31 to 0.52), but not among those who were older at surgery. It was also associated with a reduced risk for estrogen and progesterone receptor-positive tumors (OR = 0.63, 95% CI: 0.52, 0.75) but not receptor-negative tumors. Hysterectomy with ovarian conservation (OR = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.72, 0.96) and hysterectomy with partial ovary removal (OR = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.59, 0.91) were also associated with lower risk. No association with breast cancer risk was observed with tubal sterilization only or partial ovariectomy without hysterectomy. Reproductive organ surgeries may alter ovarian hormone levels, thereby affecting breast cancer risk.
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A case-control study of body mass index and breast cancer risk in white and African-American women.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 05-25-2010
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Large body size has been associated with decreased risk of breast cancer in premenopausal women but with increased risk in postmenopausal women. Limited information is available about African-American women and differences by estrogen and progesterone receptor status.
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Use of four biomarkers to evaluate the risk of breast cancer subtypes in the womens contraceptive and reproductive experiences study.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-12-2010
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Epidemiologic studies suggest that some hormone-related risk factors in breast cancer differentially influence risk for disease subtypes classified by the status of the estrogen and progesterone receptors (ER/PR). However, it remains unclear whether human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) or p53 expression status further differentiates these exposure-risk group associations. We evaluated the associations of oral contraceptive (OC) use and reproductive factors with incident invasive breast cancer subtypes among 1,197 population-based cases and 2,015 controls from the Los Angeles County or Detroit components of the Womens Contraceptive and Reproductive Experiences Study. Case-control comparisons by ER/PR/HER2/p53 status were conducted by multivariable polychotomous unconditional logistic regression methods. We found that OC use was not associated with any breast cancer subtype as defined by ER/PR/HER2/p53 status, except for a 2.9-fold increased risk of so-called triple-negative tumors (ER(-)/PR(-)/HER2(-)) among women of 45 to 64 years of age who started OC use before age 18. Parity was associated with a decreased risk of luminal A (ER(+) or PR(+), HER2(-)), luminal B (ER(+) or PR(+)/HER2(+)), and ER(-)/PR(-)/HER2(+) tumors. Age at first full-term pregnancy was positively associated with luminal A tumors among older women. Neither of these reproductive factors was associated with triple-negative tumors. Long duration of breast-feeding lowered the risk of triple-negative and luminal A tumors. p53 status did not define further differential risk patterns. Our findings offer evidence of differences in the hormone-related risk factors between triple-negative cancers and other ER/PR/HER2-defined subtypes of breast cancer.
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Breast cancer receptor status: do results from a centralized pathology laboratory agree with SEER registry reports?
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 08-08-2009
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We investigated the extent to which estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) status results from a centralized pathology laboratory agree with ER and PR results from community pathology laboratories reported to two Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) registries (Los Angeles County and Detroit) and whether statistical estimates for the association between reproductive factors and breast cancer receptor subtypes differ by the source of data. The agreement between the centralized laboratory and SEER registry classifications was substantial for ER (kappa = 0.70) and nearly so for PR status (kappa = 0.60). Among the four subtypes defined by joint ER and PR status, the agreement between the two sources was substantial for the two major breast cancer subtypes (ER-/PR-, kappa = 0.69; ER+/PR+, kappa = 0.62) and poor for the two rarer subtypes (ER+/PR-, kappa = 0.30; ER-/PR+, kappa = 0.05). Estimates for the association between reproductive factors (number of full-term pregnancies, age at first full-term pregnancy, and duration of breastfeeding) and the two major subtypes (ER+/PR+ and ER-/PR-) differed minimally between the two sources of data. For example, parous women with at least four full-term pregnancies had 40% lower risk for ER+/PR+ breast cancer than women who had never been pregnant [centralized laboratory, odds ratio, 0.60 (95% confidence interval, 0.39-0.92); SEER, odds ratio, 0.57 (95% confidence interval, 0.38-0.85)]; no association was observed for ER-/PR- breast cancer (both P(trend) > 0.30). Our results suggest that conclusions based on SEER registry data are reasonably reliable for ER+/PR+ and ER-/PR- subtypes.
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Influence of reproductive factors on mortality after epithelial ovarian cancer diagnosis.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 07-11-2009
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Although many studies have examined the influence of reproductive factors on ovarian cancer risk, few have investigated their effect on ovarian cancer survival. We examined the prognostic influence of reproductive factors on survival after ovarian cancer diagnosis.
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Relationship between migraine history and breast cancer risk among premenopausal and postmenopausal women.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 07-11-2009
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Both migraine and breast cancer are hormonally mediated diseases, and it is biologically plausible that women with a history of migraine may have a reduced breast cancer risk. However, this relationship has only been assessed in a single relatively small study that was unable to assess the effect of migraine triggers, which are also well-established breast cancer risk factors (e.g., use of alcohol and exogenous hormones), on the inverse association observed. Utilizing data on 4,568 breast cancer cases and 4,678 controls who participated in a multicenter population-based case-control study in the United States, we evaluated the association between migraine history and breast cancer risk using unconditional logistic regression. Migraine history data were obtained from structured in-person interviews. Women with a history of migraine had a reduced risk of breast cancer [odds ratio, 0.74; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.66-0.82]. This risk did not differ by menopausal status, age at migraine diagnosis, use of prescription migraine medications, or when analyses were restricted to women who avoided various migraine triggers (including alcohol, exogenous hormones, and smoking). These data support a previous finding that a history of migraine may be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer. It extends the prior report in observing that this relationship holds for both premenopausal and postmenopausal women and is independent of exposure to common migraine triggers.
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Health disparities among Mexican American women aged 15-44 years: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999-2004.
Am J Public Health
PUBLISHED: 05-14-2009
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We analyzed the health of Mexican American women aged 15 to 44 years, by generation and language preference, to guide planning for reproductive health services in this growing population.
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Immigration measures and reproductive health among Hispanic youth: findings from the national longitudinal survey of youth, 1997-2003.
J Adolesc Health
PUBLISHED: 04-10-2009
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To explore relationships between immigration measures and risk of reproductive and sexual events among U.S. Hispanic adolescents.
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Cervical cancer screening in the US-Mexico border region: a binational analysis.
Matern Child Health J
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Cervical cancer mortality is high along the US-Mexico border. We describe the prevalence of a recent Papanicolaou screening test (Pap) among US and Mexican border women. We analyzed 2006 cross-sectional data from Mexicos National Survey of Health and Nutrition and the US Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Women aged 20-77 years in 44 US border counties (n = 1,724) and 80 Mexican border municipios (n = 1,454) were studied. We computed weighted proportions for a Pap within the past year by age, education, employment, marital status, health insurance, health status, risk behaviors, and ethnicity and adjusted prevalence ratios (APR) for the US, Mexico, and the region overall. Sixty-five percent (95 %CI 60.3-68.6) of US women and 32 % (95 %CI 28.7-35.2) of Mexican women had a recent Pap. US residence (APR = 2.01, 95 %CI 1.74-2.33), marriage (APR = 1.31, 95 %CI 1.17-1.47) and insurance (APR = 1.38, 95 %CI 1.22-1.56) were positively associated with a Pap test. Among US women, insurance and marriage were associated (APR = 1.21, 95 %CI 1.05-1.38 and 1.33, 95 %CI 1.10-1.61, respectively), and women aged 20-34 years were about 25 % more likely to have received a test than older women. Insurance and marriage were also positively associated with Pap testing among Mexican women (APR = 1.39, 95 %CI 1.17-1.64 and 1.50; 95 %CI 1.23-1.82, respectively), as were lower levels of education (?8th grade or 9th-12th grade versus some college) (APR = 1.74; 95 %CI 1.21-2.52 and 1.60; 95 %CI 1.03-2.49, respectively). Marriage and insurance were associated with a recent Pap test on both sides of the border. Binational insurance coverage increases and/or cost reductions might bolster testing among unmarried and uninsured women, leading to earlier cervical cancer diagnosis and potentially lower mortality.
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Examination of ancestral informative markers and self-reported race with tumor characteristics of breast cancer among Black and White women.
Breast Cancer Res. Treat.
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African American (AA) women have a higher mortality from breast cancer (BC) compared to European American (EA) women. This may be due to the higher proportion of AA women with tumors that are diagnosed at more advanced stages and are characterized as being estrogen receptor negative (ER-)/progesterone receptor negative (PR-). Our study sought to determine whether self-reported race and percent African ancestry were associated with BC tumor characteristics. In a multi-center, population-based case-control study of BC, we determined percent African ancestry using ancestry informative markers (AIM) among women self-reporting race as AA or Black. BC tumor characteristics were associated with self-reported race (including a 30 % reduction in ER+/PR+ tumors [95 % confidence interval [CI]: 0.6-0.9] and a 1.5-fold increased risk of high grade [95 % CI: 1.2-1.9] for AA women compared to EA women). AIMs among AA women were not associated with BC tumor characteristics (AA women with ?95 % versus <80 % African ancestry, odds ratio [OR] = 1.0 for ER+/PR+ [95 % CI: 0.6-1.8] and OR = 0.9 for high-grade tumors [95 % CI: 0.6-1.4]). Similar findings were observed for BC stage. While BC subtypes were associated with self-reported race, BC subtypes were not associated with percent African ancestry. These study results suggest that subtle differences in percent African ancestry are less important than the overall presence of African ancestry in relation to BC tumor characteristics.
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Association between acculturation and breastfeeding among Hispanic women: data from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment and Monitoring System.
J Hum Lact
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Breastfeeding rates are typically higher among Hispanic women; however, they vary by acculturation status in that those more acculturated are less likely to breastfeed than those who are less acculturated. This study examined the association between acculturation and breastfeeding behaviors using population-based data.
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Estrogen-related genes and their contribution to racial differences in breast cancer risk.
Cancer Causes Control
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Racial differences in breast cancer risk, including the risks of hormone receptor subtypes of breast cancer, have been previously reported. We evaluated whether variation in genes related to estrogen metabolism (COMT, CYP1A1, CYP1B1, CYP17A1, CYP19A1, ESR1, GSTM1, GSTP1, GSTT1, HSD17B1, SULT1A1, and UGT1A1) contributes to breast cancer risk and/or racial differences in risk within the CARE study, a multi-centered, population-based case-control study of breast cancer. Genetic variation was assessed as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), haplotypes, and SNP-hormone therapy (HT) interactions within a subset of 1,644 cases and 1,451 controls, including 949 Black women (493 cases and 456 controls), sampled from the CARE study population. No appreciable associations with breast cancer risk were detected for single SNPs or haplotypes in women overall. We detected SNP-HT interactions in women overall within CYP1B1 (rs1800440; p (het) = 0.003) and within CYP17A1 (rs743572; p (het) = 0.009) in which never users of HT were at a decreased risk of breast cancer, while ever users were at a non-significant increased risk. When investigated among racial groups, we detected evidence of an SNP-HT interaction with CYP1B1 in White women (p value = 0.02) and with CYP17A1 in Black women (p value = 0.04). This analysis suggests that HT use may modify the effect of variation in estrogen-related genes on breast cancer risk, which may affect Black and White women to a different extent.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.