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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Protection of Radial Glial-Like Cells in the Hippocampus of APP/PS1 Mice: a Novel Mechanism of Memantine in the Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease.
Mol. Neurobiol.
PUBLISHED: 05-12-2014
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The failure of adult neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) is closely correlated with memory decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Radial glial-like cells (RGLs) localized to the adult DG generate intermediate progenitor cells and immature neurons and thus contribute to adult hippocampus neurogenesis. Memantine (MEM) has been indicated to dramatically increase hippocampal neurogenesis by promoting the proliferation of RGLs. In this study, we examined the effect of MEM on the capacity for hippocampal cell proliferation and the amount of RGLs in APPswe/PS1?E9 transgenic (APP/PS1) mice between 9 and 13 months of age. MEM could enhance hippocampal neurogenesis and increase the number of RGLs in the DG subgranular zone (DG-SGZ) of APP/PS1 mice of both ages. Moreover, MEM decreased amyloidogenesis in 13-month-old APP/PS1 mice and protected cultured radial glia cells (RGCs, L2.3 cells) from apoptosis induced by the ? amyloid peptide (A?). Additionally, MEM inhibited microglial activation in a vertical process in DG-SGZ of APP/PS1 mice and decreased interacting with RGL processes. Reelin is involved in the proliferation of RGLs in the hippocampus, which was typically upregulated in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 mice by MEM and thought to be an active signaling pathway associated with the MEM-induced increase in RGLs. Our data suggest a previously uncharacterized role for MEM in treating AD.
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Molecular characterization of three ferret badger (Melogale moschata) rabies virus isolates from Jiangxi province, China.
Arch. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 02-28-2014
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Ferret badger (FB) rabies viruses JX09-17(fb), JX09-18 and JX10-37 were isolated from three different regions in Jiangxi province, China, in 2009 and 2010. The complete nucleotide sequence identity between these three isolates was 87-93 %. Compared with the other Chinese rabies virus isolates and vaccine strains, 101 substitutions (53 in JX10-37, 23 in JX09-17(fb) and 25 in JX09-18) in the five structural proteins were observed, and 47 of these substitutions (27 in JX10-37, 14 in JX09-17(fb) and 6 in JX09-18) were unique among lyssaviruses. Amino acid substitutions of S231 and Q333 were noted respectively in the G protein antigenic site I of JX10-37 and site III in JX09-17(fb). Phylogenetic analysis showed that JX09-17(fb) is rooted within the China I lineage, JX09-18 is in China II, and JX10-37 is independent. Evolutionary analysis and comparative sequence data indicate that isolate JX10-37 is a variant virus that diverged from canine rabies viruses around 1933 (range 1886-1963).
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Experimental oral immunization of ferret badgers (Melogale moschata) with a recombinant canine adenovirus vaccine CAV-2-E3?-RGP and an attenuated rabies virus SRV9.
J. Wildl. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 02-07-2014
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Ferret badgers (Melogale moschata) are a major reservoir of rabies virus in southeastern China. Oral immunization has been shown to be a practical method for wildlife rabies management in Europe and North America. Two groups of 20 ferret badgers were given a single oral dose of a recombinant canine adenovirus-rabies vaccine, CAV-2-E3?-RGP, or an experimental attenuated rabies virus vaccine, SRV9. At 21 days, all ferret badgers had seroconverted, with serum virus-neutralizing antibodies ranging from 0.1 to 4.5 IU/mL. Titers were >0.50 IU/mL (an acceptable level) in 17/20 and 16/20 animals receiving CAV-2-E3?-RGP or SRV9, respectively. The serologic results indicate that the recombinant CAV-2-E3?-RGP is at least as effective as the attenuated rabies virus vaccine. Both may be considered for additional research as oral rabies vaccine candidates for ferret badgers.
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Molecular characterization of a rabies virus isolate from a rabid dog in Hanzhong District, Shaanxi Province, China.
Arch. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 10-06-2013
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A canine rabies virus, Shaanxi-HZ-6, was isolated in Shaanxi Province, China, in 2009. Its genome has been completely sequenced and found to be closely related to the China I rabies virus strains widely circulating in China. The genomic length was 11,923 base pairs, and the overall organization of the genome was similar to that of other rabies virus isolates. Compared with isolates CQ92 and J, 84 amino acid substitutions (7 in the N gene, 15 in P, 6 in M, 25 in G, 31 in L) were observed in strain Shaanxi-HZ-6. Amino acid substitutions of R264H and V332I were noted in the G protein antigenic site I and site III, respectively. Residue 333 of the G protein, which is considered to be associated with pathogenicity, was Arg in Shaanxi-HZ-6. These and other substitutions may help provide an explanation why the China I lineage strain maintains its prevalence in China.
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Complete Genome Sequence of a Rabies Virus Isolate from a Ferret Badger (Melogale moschata) in Jiangxi, China.
Genome Announc
PUBLISHED: 06-15-2013
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The genome of ferret badger rabies virus JX09-17(fb), isolated in Jiangxi Province, China, in 2009 has been completely sequenced. The genomic length is 11, 923 nucleotides (nt) with an overall organization similar to that of other rabies virus isolates. JX09-17(fb) is closely related to Chinese epidemic canine isolates in clade I.
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Epidemic and maintenance of rabies in Chinese ferret badgers (Melogale moschata) indicated by epidemiology and the molecular signatures of rabies viruses.
Virol Sin
PUBLISHED: 03-08-2013
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An epidemic of Chinese ferret badger-associated human rabies was investigated in Wuyuan county, Jiangxi province and rabies viruses isolates from ferret badgers in different districts in Jiangxi and Zhejiang provinces were sequenced with their nucleotides and amino acids and aligned for epidemiological analysis. The results showed that the human rabies in Wuyuan are only associated with ferret badger bites; the rabies virus can be isolated in a high percentage of ferret badgers in the epidemic areas in Jiangxi and Zhejiang provinces; the isolates share the same molecular features in nucleotides and have characteristic amino acid signatures, i.e., 2 sites in the nucleoprotein and 3 sites in the glycoprotein, that are distinct from virus isolates from dogs in the same region. We conclude that rabies in Chinese ferret badgers has formed an independent transmission cycle and ferret badgers may serve as another important rabies reservoir independent of dog rabies in China.
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BMP signaling controls muscle mass.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2013
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Cell size is determined by the balance between protein synthesis and degradation. This equilibrium is affected by hormones, nutrients, energy levels, mechanical stress and cytokines. Mutations that inactivate myostatin lead to excessive muscle growth in animals and humans, but the signals and pathways responsible for this hypertrophy remain largely unknown. Here we show that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, acting through Smad1, Smad5 and Smad8 (Smad1/5/8), is the fundamental hypertrophic signal in mice. Inhibition of BMP signaling causes muscle atrophy, abolishes the hypertrophic phenotype of myostatin-deficient mice and strongly exacerbates the effects of denervation and fasting. BMP-Smad1/5/8 signaling negatively regulates a gene (Fbxo30) that encodes a ubiquitin ligase required for muscle loss, which we named muscle ubiquitin ligase of the SCF complex in atrophy-1 (MUSA1). Collectively, these data identify a critical role for the BMP pathway in adult muscle maintenance, growth and atrophy.
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Isolation of Irkut virus from a Murina leucogaster bat in China.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2013
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Bats are recognized as a major reservoir of lyssaviruses; however, no bat lyssavirus has been isolated in Asia except for Aravan and Khujand virus in Central Asia. All Chinese lyssavirus isolates in previous reports have been of species rabies virus, mainly from dogs. Following at least two recent bat-associated human rabies-like cases in northeast China, we have initiated a study of the prevalence of lyssaviruses in bats in Jilin province and their public health implications. A bat lyssavirus has been isolated and its pathogenicity in mice and genomic alignment have been determined.
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Analysis of an outbreak of human rabies in 2009 in Hanzhong District, Shaanxi province, China.
Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis.
PUBLISHED: 05-22-2010
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Between March and August 2009, there was an outbreak of rabies in both humans and dogs in Hanzhong District, Shaanxi province, China. About 7300 humans were bitten by dogs and 20 died of rabies due to failure to perform postexposure prophylaxis. The local authorities therefore conducted a dog slaughter campaign. From a random selection of brains of dogs culled in the campaign, 0/27 tested positive for rabies virus by immunofluorescence. Of two dogs known to have bitten humans, one was shown to contain live rabies virus by immunofluorescence and mouse intracerebral inoculation. Serological studies during the outbreak revealed that only 1/27 dog was antibody positive: after a mass vaccination campaign, 20.8% seroconverted. Lack of canine vaccination was clearly the main reason for dog rabies spread and human infection. Phylogenetic analysis of a virus isolate showed that its genomic sequence was closely related to the clade 1 rabies strains widely circulating in China. The highest homology was found with the isolate circulating in Sichuan province, a neighboring province south of Shaanxi, indicating the spread of rabies from the south to the north.
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Expression of Stat3 and Notch1 is associated with cisplatin resistance in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.
Oncol. Rep.
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2010
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Cisplatin is the most important chemotherapeutic agent involved in treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), but cisplatin resistance in HNSCC is still a serious problem in clinic. The reasons why patients fail chemotherapy are unclear. We examined 25 HNSCC patients who were all tested for cisplatin sensitivity by CD-DST (collagen gel droplet embedded culture-drug sensitivity) method and expression of Stat3 and Notch1. We found that high expression levels of Stat3 and Notch1 were closely associated with cisplatin resistance respectively (P=0.014, P=0.000). In addition, cisplatin resistance of HNSCC was decreased after inhibition of Stat3 or Notch signaling in vitro. Our results provide first evidence that both high Stat3 and Notch1 expression are associated with cisplatin resistance in HNSCC patients, supporting the hypothesis that co-activation of Stat3 and Notch1 by their crosstalk induces the reprogrammed survival pathways in HNSCC responding to chemotherapy.
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Ferret badger rabies origin and its revisited importance as potential source of rabies transmission in Southeast China.
BMC Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 01-31-2010
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The frequent occurrence of ferret badger-associated human rabies cases in southeast China highlights the lack of laboratory-based surveillance and urges revisiting the potential importance of this animal in rabies transmission. To determine if the ferret badgers actually contribute to human and dog rabies cases, and the possible origin of the ferret badger-associated rabies in the region, an active rabies survey was conducted to determine the frequency of rabies infection and seroprevalence in dogs and ferret badgers.
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Characterization of a rabies virus isolate from a ferret badger (Melogale moschata) with unique molecular differences in glycoprotein antigenic site III.
Virus Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-20-2010
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Rabies virus was isolated from the brain of a Chinese ferret badger (Melogale moschata) and identified as having an R333Q substitution within its glycoprotein antigenic site III. Additionally, compared with vaccine strains and other rabies virus isolates from dogs and ferret badgers in China, the isolate had five other amino acid substitutions in its glycoprotein: P(-17)L in the signal peptide, R88H, L225M, and D422E in the ectoplasmic region, and G478E in the cytoplasmic region. This isolate possessed high virulence in suckling, weanling and adult mice. These data indicate that this is a unique rabies virus with a molecular signature that differentiates it from other strains circulating in terrestrial mammals in China. We propose that rabies virus circulates in some ferret badgers in an independent epidemiological cycle unique to China following spillover from domestic dogs or other hosts infected with rabies.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.