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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Widespread genetic heterogeneity in multiple myeloma: implications for targeted therapy.
Cancer Cell
PUBLISHED: 01-18-2014
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We performed massively parallel sequencing of paired tumor/normal samples from 203 multiple myeloma (MM) patients and identified significantly mutated genes and copy number alterations and discovered putative tumor suppressor genes by determining homozygous deletions and loss of heterozygosity. We observed frequent mutations in KRAS (particularly in previously treated patients), NRAS, BRAF, FAM46C, TP53, and DIS3 (particularly in nonhyperdiploid MM). Mutations were often present in subclonal populations, and multiple mutations within the same pathway (e.g., KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF) were observed in the same patient. In vitro modeling predicts only partial treatment efficacy of targeting subclonal mutations, and even growth promotion of nonmutated subclones in some cases. These results emphasize the importance of heterogeneity analysis for treatment decisions.
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Hypodiploid multiple myeloma is characterized by more aggressive molecular markers than non-hyperdiploid multiple myeloma.
Haematologica
PUBLISHED: 05-28-2013
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Multiple myeloma can be categorized into hyperdiploid or non-hyperdiploid myeloma based on the number of chromosomes found in the tumor clone. Among the non-hyperdiploid myelomas, the hypodiploid subtype has the most aggressive clinical phenotype, but the genetic differences between groups are not completely defined. In order to understand the genetic background of hypodiploid multiple myeloma better, we compared the genomic (array-based comparative genomic hybridization) and transcriptomic (gene expression profiling) background of 49 patients with hypodiploid myeloma with 50 other non-hyperdiploid and 125 hyperdiploid myeloma patients. There were significant chromosomal and gene expression differences between hyperdiploid patients and non-hyperdiploid and hypodiploid patients. Non-hyperdiploid and hypodiploid patients shared most of the chromosomal abnormalities; nevertheless a subset of these abnormalities, such as monosomies 13, 14 and 22, was markedly increased in hypodiploid patients. Furthermore, deletions of 1p, 12p, 16q and 17p, all associated with poor outcome or progression in multiple myeloma, were significantly enriched in hypodiploid patients. Molecular risk-stratification indices reinforce the worse prognosis associated with hypodiploid multiple myeloma compared with non-hyperdiploid multiple myeloma. Gene expression profiling clustered hypodiploid and non-hyperdiploid subgroups closer than hyperdiploid myeloma but also highlighted the up-regulation of CCND2, WHSC1/MMSET and FGFR3 in the hypodiploid subtype. In summary, hypodiploid multiple myeloma is genetically similar to non-hyperdiploid multiple myeloma but characterized by a higher prevalence of genetic alterations associated with poor outcome and disease progression. It is provocative to hypothesize that hypodiploid multiple myeloma is an advanced stage of non-hyperdiploid multiple myeloma.
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Uncovering the biology of multiple myeloma among African Americans: a comprehensive genomics approach.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 02-19-2013
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Epidemiological data have suggested that African American (AA) persons are twice as likely to be diagnosed with multiple myeloma (MM) compared with European American (EA) persons. Here, we have analyzed a set of cytogenetic and genomic data derived from AA and EA MM patients. We have compared the frequency of IgH translocations in a series of data from 115 AA patients from 3 studies and 353 EA patients from the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) studies E4A03 and E9487. We have also interrogated tumors from 45 AA and 196 EA MM patients for somatic copy number abnormalities associated with poor outcome. In addition, 35 AA and 178 EA patients were investigated for a transcriptional profile associated with high-risk disease. Overall, based on this cohort, genetic profiles were similar except for a significantly lower frequency of IgH translocations (40% vs 52%; P = .032) in AA patients. Frequency differences of somatic copy number aberrations were not significant after correction for multiple testing. There was also no significant difference in the frequency of high-risk disease based on gene expression profiling. Our study represents the first comprehensive comparisons of the frequency and distribution of molecular alterations in MM tumors between AA and EA patients. ECOG E4A03 is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00098475. ECOG E9487 is a companion validation set to the ECOG study E9486 and is registered with the National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, Clinical Trials (PDQ), number EST-9486.
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Initial genome sequencing and analysis of multiple myeloma.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 01-17-2011
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Multiple myeloma is an incurable malignancy of plasma cells, and its pathogenesis is poorly understood. Here we report the massively parallel sequencing of 38 tumour genomes and their comparison to matched normal DNAs. Several new and unexpected oncogenic mechanisms were suggested by the pattern of somatic mutation across the data set. These include the mutation of genes involved in protein translation (seen in nearly half of the patients), genes involved in histone methylation, and genes involved in blood coagulation. In addition, a broader than anticipated role of NF-?B signalling was indicated by mutations in 11 members of the NF-?B pathway. Of potential immediate clinical relevance, activating mutations of the kinase BRAF were observed in 4% of patients, suggesting the evaluation of BRAF inhibitors in multiple myeloma clinical trials. These results indicate that cancer genome sequencing of large collections of samples will yield new insights into cancer not anticipated by existing knowledge.
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A case study of professional change: the impact of the National Gerontological Social Work Competencies Survey.
Gerontol Geriatr Educ
PUBLISHED: 08-24-2010
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Our society is aging, and this demographic change necessitates that all social workers have basic competency in gerontology. This article describes the results of a competency survey conducted in 2000, and how these results helped transform basic social work curricula and enhance gerontology-related resources. Results were used to encourage and assist social work faculty to infuse gerontological content into social work curriculum, which helped practitioners to gain the necessary knowledge and skills to meet the needs of a growing aging population. This social work education framework can be replicated in an effort to infuse gerontology content throughout other disciplines.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.